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Full text of "Antioch News 04/27/2007"






- . , - 




ANTIOCH ^ 




LAKE 



HffiSi 







Edition of April 27-May 3, 2007 



% 



% 



Finding hope 

Lake County's Methadone Maintenance 

Treatment Program helps recovering opiate 

addicts find their way back to society. "It's 

fiejped me stay clean, and it allowed me to 



' ^ ' ^etfeb and keep a job," a participant said 
<%./ 7 W^ PAGF1I 



PAGE 10A 




la 



Breaking news @ 
LakeCountyJournals.com 



Five things to do in and 
around Lake County: 



Niles North Vocal Fest 

Saturday, April 28 

Enjoy the sounds of the 
Niles North Vocal Festival. 
For information, call (847) 
626-2122 



Live performance 

7 p.m. Sunday, April 29 

Mark Hobbs, Donna Adler 
and Bob Smietana will per- 
form at El Barrio Restaurant. 
,For info, call (847) 566-0475 



Zoo Tot Spot opens 

Sunday, April 28 

Brookfield Zoo will officially 
open its Fisher-Price Tot Spot 
at Hamill Zoo. For information, 
call (708) 485-0263 



Polar bear cub 

Daily at the zoo 

See the 4-month-old polar 
bear cub at Brookfield Zoo. 
The cub made its debut April 
20. Info: (708) 485-0263 



Teens and Money 

7-8 p.m. Monday, April 30 

Great Lakes Credit Union 
will host 'Teens and Money: 
Preparing for Financial Indep- 
endence." (847) 838-7100 



Police Beat 6A 

Births...... . 4A 

LakeLife .. IB 

Fun & Games 9B 

Obituaries 13A 

Opinion 17A 

Sports .'. 10B 

Proudly serving 
Antioch and 
North Central 
Lake County 

Founded in 1886 

iWest 

GROUP 

- CHICAGO 




^"yBPH'OOOZS 1 " I 



Volume 121. No. 17 
Newstand price 50 cents 






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Projecting cultural talent 





Chris Padgett - epadgetttSnwnewsgroup.ccm 

Marlena Dlugopolski practices her ballet routine as she waits with fellow dancers (from left) Madeline Gutierrez, Nicole Parfitt and Madeline Hart during Antioch 
Elementary School's International Show. The dancers represented France in their performance on April 21. 

International Dinner raises $5,000 for scHoofprojectors 




By TARA CLIFTON 

Icli f Ionian wn ewsgroup.com 

ANTIOCH - Students and families ate food 

native to at least three foreign countries, enjoyed 

the dances of far-away lands, and raised money 

while they were at it. 

Not bad for Antioch Elementary School's 
International Dinner. Taking placelast weeKencTar 

Antioch Upper Grade School, the event aimed to 

raise money to buy projectors for each classroom. 

Evie Amelio, who helped organize the event, 
said that the school garnered $5,000. Each projector 
costs $1,000. 

The night was a huge hit and was even more 
special, because of student participation, Amelio 
said. 

The 95 children in the show performed French 
ballet, played African drums, belly danced, and 



even played a 1950s number to represent the United 
States, just to name a few acts, Amelio said. 

And the 575 audience members really enjoyed 
the "cute" parade at the end of the show, when all 
the students marched to "It's a Small World," she 
said; 

Last week, Kim Zurek, whose daughter Amanda 

isjn the second grade at Antioch Elementary, said 
"sheliaa 'looked Toward to'the fundraiser. 

"Amanda is just so excited," Zurek said. "She's 
been practicing and practicing." \ ' 

Tracy Campbell is another parent at Antioch 
Elementary School. 

"It was awesome," she said. "Those kids looked 
wonderful and they did such a good job." 

And the food was pretty tasty too, Amelio said. 

Members of the Katris family, owners of Las . 
Vegas restaurant, located on Main Street down- 
town, cooked up Greek and Middle Eastern dishes, 




Chris Radgell • cpadgeU@fltvnewsgnxip.coni 

.Students perform the "Chicken Dance" to represent 
Germany during Antioch Elementary School's 
International Dinner. 

as well as German bratwursts, Amelio said. 

"These people give so much back to the commu- 
nity," Zurek said. "Especially the school. They are 
always there whenever we need anything." 



SPORTS 




» PrepSports 

Sibling rivalry 

Former mates Antioch and Lakes go 
at it on the baseball field to see who 
controls northern Lake County in the 
springtime. PAGE 10B 

All tied up 

Warren and Lakes softball are so evenly 
matched that after 11 innings, they are 
forced to decide it another day. . 

PAGE10B 

» Can'tMiss 

Boys Volleyball 

Lakes at Antioch, 6 p.m., Friday, April 27, 

Girls Soccer 

Wauconda at Carmel, 4:30 p.m., 
Tuesday, May 1. 

» SideLines 

Lake County Journals sports editor 
Dan Patrick takes a look at how sports 
allegiances might be crazy, but not 
insane. 

PAGE10B 



LAKELIFE 



» OnTheWeb 

• Check out Dr. Sherri Singer's 
column, Parent Place, this week at 
LakeCountyJournals.com in the 
LakeLife section. . 

• Leslie Glazier-Werner's column, 
Les on Life, also appears on the 
Web site in the LakeLife section. 

» EveryMom 

Columnist Jami Kunzer discusses 
how to handle "the sex 
talk" with younger 
children. 

PAGE8B 




IN MOTION 



Lacrosse is catching on 
as a hot prep sport 
throughoutthe suburbs. 
Check out a video on its 
growing popularity by 
logging on to 
LakeCountyJournals.com 
and clicking on the . 
multime- * /- 
dia sec- mtiLtiw&uti/ 



tion 
located 
on the 
right 
side of 
the screen. 




WEEKEND OUTLOOK 



FRIDAY, APRIL 27 

M HIGH: 58 

-STv?* LOW: 40 

SATURDAY, APRIL 28 

HIGH: 70 






LOW: 49 



SUNDAY, APRIL 29 



. 



HIGH: 74 
LOW: 53 



. Source: CBS2 Chicago 
For updates visit LakeC0untyJ0umaI5.com 



This week's question 

1 

Spring has sprung. What is the 
best way to enjoy the outdoors? 

A) Lake County Forest Preserve 

B) Six Flags Great America 

C) Area golf courses 

D) Lake Michigan . 

E) Chain '0 Lakes 

F) Other 

Vote at LakeCountyJoumals.com 



last week's question 

' In light of the Virginia Tech shoot- 
ings April 16, would you be in favor 
of stricter gun control laws? 

No (67 percent). 

Yes (33 percent) 




or visit us on the 

web at 
ivww.vtctorylBkcs.org 



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1075 Victory Drive • Lindenluim, IL 60046 

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Page 2A • April 27, 2007 AN 



ifflMMlMH 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



»AboutUs 



i, 



ANTIOCH 



P 



OURNAL 



Serving Lhe 
Antioch area since 188(J 

Volume 121 No. 17 (USPS 027-080) • 

Dig ANTIOCH JOURNAL Is 

published weekly on Friday. It Is a 

member of lhe NorthWest News 

Group. Periodical mail postage paid at 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Antioch Journal 

34121 N. Route 45, Suite 224 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

POSTMASTER: 

Send address changes to Antioch 

Journal, 34121 N. Route 45, Suite 224, 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

All rights reserved. Copyright 2007. 

MAIN OFFICE 
847-223-8161 

QUESTIONS REGARDING 
YOUR SUBSCRIPTION? 

800-589-9363 

Look for us on the Internet at 
LnkeCountyJournals.com 

EDITORIAL 

34121 N. Route 45, Suite 224, 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

Phone:847-223-8161 

E-mail: wlnGws@nwncwsgroup.com 

Fax:847-223-8810 

ADVERTISING 

Sales and Classified 

J. Thomas Shaw 847-223-8161 

E-mail: 

Display: LMads@nwnewsgroup.com 

Classified: 

LMclass@nwnewsgroup.com 

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

$9.88 in Lake County; 
$17.95 elsewhere. 



» QuoteOfTheWeek 

"It was like going to people's houses and being Santa Claus," 

—Bret Mumcnthaler, Antioch Rotary Club member, on the donation of beds to 

needy families (see story on 4A) 



» NewsYouNeed 

This weeks's top local stories: 

• Antioch Rotary Club donates beds to needy families. 4A 

• School District 34 evaluates its options after referendum failure. 6A 

• Muskle hunters make their way to Antioch for qualifying event. 6A 



» Editor'sChoice b v Larr y Lou 9 h 



It's good to know you're out there 



Newspapers don't often hear from readers. 

But it's always good when we do. We appreciate 
that readers care enough to respond, whether it be 
good or bad. 

Thanks to the several of you who accepted our 
offer to send you the Pocket Guide to Access in 
Illinois. That's a wallet-sized card summarizing your 
rights to attend meetings and see records of govern- 
ment.agencies, both state and local. 

The offer still stands. Just let us know. 

We also heard from several readers - from irritat- 



ed to angry - with objections to a headline in 
Spanish that we published April 6 on the front page 
of two editions. 

"When did the language of the United States 
become Spanish?" one reader wrote. 

"I can only hope you're young enough so that one 
day you'll lose your job to a lower paid 'granted 
amnesty guest worker,'" wrote another. 

For the record, we thought the headline was 
appropriate to the story about how Easter customs 
differ in the U.S. and Mexico. 



At some future time, we might also publish a 
headline in French, Russian, Japanese or other lan- 
guage if it's appropriate to the story. As we did with 
the Spanish headline, we will readily provide the 
English translation to avoid confusion. 

Let us know what you think - good or bad. Write 
to llough@nwnewsgroup,com. 

Thanks for reading the Journal. 

• Larry Lough is editor and general manager of 
Lake County Journals. 




John Rung - Group Publisher 
Chris Krag - Group Editor ">.. 



I 



LAKL COUNTY 



OURNALS 



tarry tough ■ 
Genera! Manager and Editor 

"Serving our communities 

to make them better 

places to live." 



Service with a smile 




» CorrectionsAnd 
Clarifications 

Accuracy is important to' 
us at the Lake County 
Journals and we strive to cor- 
rect mistakes promptly. If you 
believe a factual error has 
been published, please bring 
it to our attention. 

Call Larry Lough at (847) 
223-8161 or e-mail him at 
llough@nwnewsgroup.com. 



*- Sandy Bressner • sbressner@iiwnewsgroup.com 

Gerl Mark, of Round Lake, a member of the Antioch Happy Cookers, addresses the crowd during a senior citizens' jamboree at the 
Lakefront Park in Fox Lake. The event also included senior bands from Waukegan, Fox Lake and Libertyville. 



Visit our NEW and 
IMPROVED site! 



blogs 
videos 
classified 
reader poll 
local news 
... and more!! 



LakeCountyJournats.com 

Your Life. Connected. 




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Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals,com 



COMMUNITY 



AN April 27, 2007* Page 3A 



1 






Local woman shares success 

Gurnee-based business dispenses health tips through multiple mediums 



By EMILY PREVITI 

epreviti@nwnewsgroup,com 

GURNEE - Laura Bryant is 
training for a half-marathon. 

The 37-year-old said she lias long 
prioritized health. 

"Ever since I can remember, I've 
read anything 1 could get my hands 
on about health and nutrition," 
Bryant said. 

But nearly a decade ago, the 
Gunrce resident underwent a brief 
struggle with the scale. At 26, she 
started to gain weight while work- 
ing 12-hour days as a manager at 
Call Center. Ultimately, she packed 
on 40 pounds. 

"I was not at all happy with 
where I was," she said. 

So Bryant crafted a plan to shed 
the weight. She lost 15 pounds 
before quitting her job in 2003. After 
that, she whittled away the remain- 
ing 25 pounds in four months. 

"As somebody who'd been 
healthy before, if I'm going to gain 
40 pounds, I was thinking about 
women who might not have the his- 
tory I have," she said. "The issue for 
the majority of women is in their 
head. What will sabotage them 
again and again and again are the 
thoughts and beliefs that they 
have." 

So Bryant started Inspire 
Fitness, which aims to help women 
lead better, healthy lives. 

Bryant just oversaw the conclu- 
sion of the company's first e-class, 
"Beyond Weight-Loss." She plans to 
seek feedback from a pair of partic- 
ipants after April 27, the last day of 
the program. 

The next six-week session starts 
May 19. 

For $297, enrollees receive a 
weekly newsletter, personalized 
coaching from Bryant through e- 
mail and a copy of Bryant's book, 
"Trust Yourself to Transform Your 
Body: A Woman's Guide to Health 
and Weight-Loss Without Diets." 
Since its publication in 2005, more 
than 2,000 people have bought the 
book. 

Success story 

Debra Winkler-Valadez read 
"Trust Yourself" in August 2005. 




Chris Padgell • cpadgclls nwnewsgfoup.com 



Laura Bryant, of Gurnee, runs along a path 
runs Inspire Fitness, a company that aims 

More info 

People interested in the "Beyond 
Weightless" e-class can find out more 
through a teleseminar scheduled to start 
at 7 p.m. on May 16. Contact Laura K. 
Brant at (847) 816-7298' or 
Laura@TrustYourselftoTransform.com. Go 
to www.SlTE.com to sign up for the 
newsletter or to find out about the upcom- 
ing teleseminar and e-class session. 

The 39-year-old mother of five said 
she read the book at least four times 
as she lost 54 pounds in a year. She 
said she plans to re-read it as an e- 
class participant to lose another 20 
pounds. 

The Kenosha resident discovered 
Inspire Fitness through co-workers 
who enjoyed "Trust Yourself" for 
its departure from other "typical 
diet books." 

Winkler-Valadez said she can 
now balance food choices and fit- 
ness with her full-time job and 
motherhood. 

Winkler-Valadez said Bryant's 



in Independence Grove in Libertyville, where she trains for a half-marathon. Bryant 
to help women take responsibility for their health, weight and bodies. 



program provided support and 
guidance that was flexible. 

"I thought, 'What's going to work 
best for me?'" she said. 

For her, it was joining a health' 
club close to her Lincolnshire office 
that had members who were serious 
about fitness. 

Winkler-Valadez said she also 
has realized that a "taking care of 
me" attitude was not selfish, but 
helped her become a better mother 
and more productive in the profes- 
sional realm. 

"I have this renewed energy that 
I haven't had in years," she said. "I 
feel better bout myself, and my 
mind is clearer ... It's truly a life 
change." 

Business background 

Bryant has a master's degree in 
clinical psychology from Roosevelt 
University in Chicago. She used 
that knowledge, along with her 
background as a life coach, to write 
and self-publish "Trust Yourself." 

She said the volume took her one 
year to write. 



"Trust Yourself" espouses an 
anti-quick-fix philosophy. The book 
weaves Information - the gylcemic 
index and multi-muscle moves, for 
example- with prompts designed to 
help readers determine motivation 
behind their behaviors related to 
health - or lack thereof - as well as 
alternatives to those behaviors that 
have, apparently failed enough to 
bring them here. 

The first e-class started in 
March. 

Bryant said that "worldwide 
requests for workshops" inspired 
her to offer the e-class, which allows 
her to share support from her desk. 

What's next 

Bryant estimated she's spoken 
more than 70 times at park districts, 
libraries, women organizations and 
"anywhere where [she] can get 
women to congregate." 

Brant plans to tweak the e-class, 
publish an e-book and expand her 
business from a one-woman opera- 
tion to one with an administrative 
staff. 



» OurTown 




Tara 
Clifton 



Time to 
find royalty 

Have dreams of walking a red 
carpet wearing a shiny crown and 
sash? Then head over to the parks 
department to pick up an application 
for the village's annual Miss, Jr. Miss 
and Little Miss Antioch Pageant. 

The Antioch Parks and Recreation 
Department will accept applications 
until 5 p.m. on May IB. Applications 
may be picked up at the parks office, 
Village Hall, or by logging onto 
www.antioch.il.gov. A $10 fee will be 
charged. 

This year's winners will be 
awarded on Saturday, June 23, in the 
Antioch Community High School 
auditorium. 

A Miss, Jr. Miss and Little Miss 
Antioch will be crowned. Jr. Miss 
hopefuls must be between the ages of 
11 through 13 and Little Miss is for 
girls ages 6 through 8. 

Miss candidates must be from 
ages 16 to 21, show community 
involvement and academic excel- 
lence, and provide three references. 
The winner will receive a scholar- 
ship for college tuition. 

Questions? Call the parks depart- 
ment at (847) 395-2160. 

Robert and Mashelt Bird of Antioch 
are the proud parents of Robert, a 
sophomore at Illinois College in 
Jacksonville. 

Their son recently pledged Phi 
Alpha Literary Society this semester. 
Literary societies have roots in the 
19th century, and offer fraternal, 
social and literary activities. 

These societies usuallly have 
weekly meetings and offer programs 
where members can present essays,, 
debate, readings, and individual 
compositions. 



• If you have interesting Information or 

anecdotes to submit for "Our Town," e-mail 

reporter Tara Clifton at tclifton@ 

nwnewsgroup.com. 




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Page 4A • April 27, 2007 AN 



COMMUNITY 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



Rotary collects beds 
for needy families 

Club receives $1,000 check to aid efforts 



By TARA CLIFTON 

tclifton@nwnewsgroup.com 

ANTIOCH - Because or 
the efforts of members of the 
Antioch Rotary Club, needy 
families now have beds to 
sleep in. 

With a budget of $4,000, 
rotary members collected 25 
mattresses, including box 
springs, head boards, sheets 
and pillows, member Bret 
Mumenthalcr said. 

This was all done during 
the past two months, and it 
started when one member 
was told that some families 
only had floors to sleep on. 

Open Arms Mission pro- 
vided many of the names of 



families who needed beds, 
Mumenthalcr said, and then 
tile rotary set to work. 

In teams of two to eight, 
members installed the bods at 
each home. 

Mumenthaler and follow 
rotary member Bob 
Schneider said it was great to 
slj how happy the kids were 
to got new beds. 

"It was like going to peo- 
ple's houses and being Santa 
Claus," Mumenthalcr said, 

Schneider joked that once 
the beds had been set up, the 
kids probably started bounc- 
ing on the mattresses. 

"When we pulled up, thoy 
were jumping up and down," 
Mumenthaler said. "It was 



awesome. 

To honor the rotary for 
their efforts, and also to help 
them out financially, repre- 
sentatives attended the 
rotary luncheon last week to 
present them with a $1,000 
check. 

But Schneider and 
Mumenthaler were quick to 
point out that it wasn't just 
the rotary that made this hap- 
pen. 

They received discounts 
from mattress stores and peo- 
ple outside the club also 
donated time, money and 
materials. 

"This was great we wore 
able to bring these beds," 
Mumenthalcr said. 



"I would recommend State Bank of The Lakes to 
anyone looking for a home equity line of credit. 
Their rates are great and their staff is very 
knowledgeable. It's a bank where everyone 
knows your name and they take care of my 
needs right away." 

Lyn Fitch 



i 



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WS£Wtit, 



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STATE BANK 
THE LAKES 



Aiiiindi Hunk: 
4-111 l.iiki-SlriTl 
A nlimli, ll.titiWl 
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K47-35f.-57llll 



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»Births 

Martin Henry Ness, a son, 
was born March 3 at Condell 
Medical Center in Liberty ville 
to David and Corinne Ness of 
Antioch. His brother is Max, 3, 
Grandparents are Richard and 
Mary Nelson of Round Lake 
Beach and Rodger and Barbara 
Ness of St. Anthony, Minn. 
Great-grandparent is Vina 
Medberry of Elgin, Iowa. 

Reilly James Callender, a 
son, was born March 7 at 
Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville to Karen and Joseph 
Callender of Antioch. His broth- 
er is Tyler, 6. Grandparents are 
Anna Jackson of Round Lake; 
Scott and Sarah Callender of 
Antioch and Dawn Grody of 
Burlington, Wis. Great-grand- 
parents are Dennis and Barb 
Cline of Mountain Home, Ark. 

•Grace Mary and Josie 
Michelle Quirke, twins, were 
born March 8 at Lake Forest 
Hospital to Brian and Jennifer 
Quirke of Antioch. Their sisters 



are Maggie, 4, and Katie, 3. 
Grandparents are Jody Connell 
of Round Lake Beach; Richard 
Connell of Arlington Heights; 
and Jim and Bonnie Quirke of 
Libertyville. 

Grade Marie Wills, a daugh- 
ter, was born March 21 at 
Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville to Cory and Anne 
Wills of Antioch. Her sister is 
Alyssa, 2. Grandparents are 
Jerry Gibbs of Gurnee and Tom 
and Carole Wills of Waukegan. 
Great-grandparent is Simone 
Gibbs of Libertyville. 

Charley Giselle Keel, a 

daughter, was born March 23 
at Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville to Jenny Keel of 
Antioch. Grandparents are 
Sandra Fecht of Antioch and 
robert Keel of Antioch. Great- 
grandparent is Herbert Dunn of 
Grayslake. 

Jonah Miguel Linderman, a 
son, was born March 13 at 



Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville to Eric and Martha 
Linderman of Antioch. His 
brother is Rudy Martinez, 13. 
Grandparents are Alistair and 
Phyllis Barman of Buffalo 
Grove; Josefa Balderas of 
Antioch; and Gabel Venegas of 
Trevor, Wis. Great-grandparents 
are Edythe Blue of Arlington 
Heights; and Guadalupe 
Venegas of Palatine. 

Erin Elizabeth Pasdiora, a 

daughter, was born March 26 
at Lake Forest Hospital to 
Edward and Eileen Pasdiora of 
Antioch. her sister is Alison, 2. 
Grandparents are Edward 
Pasdiora Sr. of Huntley and 
Joseph and LaVerne Wood of 
Elmhurst. 

Maddux Adam Kadera, a 
son, was born March 15 at Lake 
Forest Hospital to Jesse and 
Tamara Kadera of Antioch. 
Grandparents are Joy Huitzacua 
of Rockford and Robert and 
Susan Kadera of Lake Villa. 



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Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



COMMUNITY 



AN April 27, 2007* Page 5A 



... 



»LocalDigest 

Women to help women 

The Lake County Coalition 
Against Sexual Assault (LACASA) 
will host its fifth annual "Women 
Helping Women" luncheon 11 
a.m. to 2 p.m., June 15, at the 
LaCASA/Zacharias Center, 4275 
Old Grand Ave., in Gurnee. 

Alice Vachss, a former sex 
crimes prosecutor and Chief of a 
Special Victims Bureau in New 
York City, will speak at the event. 
Vachss also wrote "Sex Crimes: 
Ten Years on the Front Lines 
Prosecuting Rapists and 
Confronting their Collaborators." 

Tickets cost $75. Last year's 
event raised $70,000 to help run 
LaCASA, which aims to mobilize 
the community to end sexual 
violence. 

Registration is required and 
can be completed at 
www.LacasaStopRape.org or at 
(847) 244-1187, ext. 21. 

Tuxedoed tails 

Save-A-Pet will host "Tuxedos 
for Tails," its 21st annual auction 
on May 5. Available Items 
include jewelry, restaurant gift 
and tickets to events in Chicago. 
Doors open at 5:30 p.m., and 
dinner will be served at 7:30 
p.m., at The Stonegate, 2401 W. 
Higgins Road, in Hoffman 
Estates, Save-a-Pet is a 
Grayslake-based, no-kill animal 
shelter takes in, and tries to find 
homes for, 2,000 abused, home- 
less or abandoned cats and dogs 
each year. Tickets cost $100 and 
are available at (847) 740-7788, 
ext. 146, or information@save-a- 
pet-il.org. 

Wetlands cleanup - 
The village and Friends of the 
Wetlands will have a spring 
cleanup day from 9 a.m. to 4 



p.m. on Saturday, May 5, in the 
William E, Brook Memorial 
Wetlands, near the bandshell on 
Skidmore Drive. 

Bring work gloves and boots, 
long pants, and dress appropri- 
ately for the weather. A hot 
lunch and snacks will be provid- 
ed. 

Call Donna Bevan at ( 847) 
395-6342 if you are interested. 

Brush pick up 

The Village of Antioch will pro- 
vide brush pick up on the sec- 
ond Monday of each month 
through October. Brush must be 
at the curb by 7 a.m., and the 
brush must be stacked with the 
butt end facing the road. 
Branches should be no larger 
than 4 inches in diameter. This 
pick up is for village residents 
only. 

For more information, call the 
public works department at 
(847)395-1881. 

Poppy campaign 
Antioch Veterans of Foreign 
Wars members and the 
Women's Auxiliary will distrib- 
ute Buddy Poppies around town 
on May 4-5. The poppies were 
hand made by disabled, hospital- 
ized, and aging veterans. As the 
VFW's official memorial flower, 
the poppy represents the blood 
shed by American service mem- 
bers. All proceeds from distribu- 
tion are used for veterans' wel- 
fare. 

Cub Scout Rummage Sate 

Antioch Cub Scout Pack 191 
will have a rummage sale at the 
Antioch Senior Center from 8 
a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 
28, to raise money for their sum- 
mer camp. 



Mano-a-Mano Gala 

Mano-a-Mano will host 
Carnivale Caliente, a benefit gala 
at 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 28, at 
the Round Lake Beach Cultural 
and Civic Center. 

The evening will start with 
cocktails and entertainment and 
will include a Latin American 
dance demonstration, 

Tickets are $100 a person. 
Tables are available for groups of 
eight for $750. Dinner will be 
provided by Pear Tree Catering. 

For more information, or to buy 
tickets, contact Mano a Mano at 
(847) 201-1521. 

. Mano a Mano Family Resource 
Center Foundation Inc. is a non- 
profit organization and your con- 
tribution is tax deductible. 

Senior soiree 

What's important about county 
government? Lake County Board 
Chairwoman Suzi Schmidt will 
break it down for senior citizens 
at a free lunch at In Laws 
Restaurant, Milwaukee Avenue 
and Route 132, in Gurnee. The 
event starts at 11:30 a.m., on 
May 14. Attendees must reserve 
their place by May 8. They can 
do so with Roberta Pfeiffer at 
(847) 680-0331. Pfeiffer belongs 
to Breakfast Exchange Club of 
Gurnee, a local branch of the 
national service organization and 
the event's organizer. 

Summer help 

The Antioch Parks and 
Recreation Department is taking 
applications for summer staff 
positions, which include life- 
guards, cashiers, and Day Camp 
Counselors. 

Applications and job descrip- 
tions can be picked up at the 
parks, office on 806 Holbek Drive. 



Working together 




Sandy Bressner - sbressnctig'nwnewsgroup.eom 

Sandy Fanizza, of Lake Villa, holds open a bag as 15-year-old Taylor White and 6-year-old Jake Fanizza 
shovel mulch during the Village of Lindenhurst's annual Earth Day event. Mulch, sod and firewood were 
available to event-goers at no charge. 



»LibraryDigest 

ANTIOCH PUBLIC 
LIBRARY DISTRICT 
Book Groups-Children's 

May 4 at 10 a.m. Walk-in 
Storytime. For children ages 3, 
4, and 5. May 9 at 10 a.m. Walk- 
in Toddler Time. Storytime. May 
9 at 1 p.m. Walk-in Storytime. 
For children ages 3, 4, and 5. 
May 16 at, 3 p.m. Book 
Discussion "Regarding the 
Trees." Registration required. 
May 30 at 10 a.m. Walk-in 
Toddler Storytime. For children 2 
years old. May 30 at 1 p.m. 
Walk-in Storytime. For children 
ages 3, 4, and 5. 

Book Groups and 
Programs-Teens 

May 8 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. 
"Crunch Time" by Mariah 
Fredericks. Snacks and drinks 
will be provided. Please call 
Adult Reference for a copy of 
the book and more details. Teen 
Summer Reading Program. 
Mission Readl Will you accept 
your mission and read six books 
or 600 minutes in six weeks? 
Registration begins May 29. 

Book Groups and 

Programs-Adults 

book Chat 

1 May 15, at 7 p.m. "Digging to 

America" by Anne Tyler. For 



more info or to get a copy of 
each book, please call Adult 
Reference. 

Novel Pleasures 

May 15 at 10 a.m., " Emma" by 
Jane Austen and Jane Austen 
Book Club by Karen Fowler. For 
more info or to get a copy of 
each book, please call Adult 
Reference. Mission Possible: 
Read! Your mission, should you 
choose to accept it, is to read 
six books or spend 600 minutes 
reading or listening to recorded 
books. Registration begins May 
29 at the "upper level" Adult 
Reference desk. 

Teen Fun-Registration is 

requested. 

Chess & Cookies 

May 2 at 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. All 
ages welcome. Beginner 
instruction will be provided by 
area chess player Zack Simonini. 
Beginners and experienced play- 
ers are welcome. If you have a 
chess board, please bring it. 

You've Got Games 

May 22 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. 
Board games and card games. 
All ages welcome. Reading and 
arithmetic skills are necessary 
for most games. 

DDR (Dance Dance 



Revolution). 

May 8 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. 
Come play! Snacks and drinks 
will be provided. 

Movies & Showings 
Teen Anime Afternoon 

May 11, from 3:15 to 4:45 p.m. 
The library will provide the pop- 
corn; you can bring closed 
drinks and other snacks. Please 
call Adult Reference for title 
information. 

Thursday Night at the Movies 

May 3, at 6:30 p.m. Will Smith 
portrays Chris Gardner who 
struggled with homelessness in 
1981. Discover how Chris 
became a respected father, 
stockbroker, and millionaire. 
Please call Adult Reference for 
title information. 

Adult Reference Programs- 
State of Illinois Healthcare 
Programs 

May 10, at 7 p.m. Learn about 
the state of Illinois healthcare 
programs; All Kids, Family Care, 
Moms and Babies, Veterans 
Care, Illinois Cares RX, and I- 
Save RX, in a one-hour presen- 
tation by a representative from 
the Illinois Department of 
Healthcare and Family Services. 
Registration is requested. 




Village celebrates, 
cares for trees 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

ANTIOCH - For the 15th 
time, the National Arbor 
Day Foundation has named 
Antioch a Tree City USA. 

The community will cel- 
ebrate this recognition 
with its annual Antioch 
Arbor Day, which also 
Improves the village's land- 
scaping and environmental 
health, 

The event will be from 9 
a.m. to noon on Saturday, 
April 28, at North Park, 
located in the Antioch 
Manor North Subdivision 
off North Avenue, west of 
Route 83. 

Participants include res- 
idents, the National Junior 
Honor Society Members of 
Antioch Upper Grade 



School, the Antioch 
Community High School 
Environmental Club and 
National Honor Society stu- 
dents, and scouting groups. 

In addition to mulching, 
cleaning and planting, 
attendees also have the 
chance to take home free 
Douglas Fir seedlings, 
which are 12 to 20 inches in 
height. 

To become a Tree City 
USA, four standards must 
be met: Having a tree board 
or department, adopting a 
tree care ordinance, run- 
ning a community forestry 
program, and holding an 
Arbor Day observance. 

For more information, 
contact Laurie Slahl, direc- 
tor of the parks depart- 
ment, at (847) 395-2160. 



»FoxLake 



River Cleanup effort 
rescheduled for May 19 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

FOX LAKE - Area 
groups, organizations, 
clubs, businesses, home- 
owners and families will all 
come together to contribute 
their time and energy at the 
annual Fox River and Chain 
0' Lakes waterway cleanup. 

A new date for the effort 
will be from 8 a.m. to noon, 
rain or shine, on May 19. It 
takes place along the banks 
of the Chain 0' Lakes and 
the Fox River from the 
McHenry Dam south to the 
Algonquin Dam. 

The event is part of the 
National Cleanup Week 
that in its 16th year of 
cleanups. The Illinois EPA 
provided a grant to FWA for 
this effort through the 
Steambank Cleanup and 
Lakeshore Enhancement 
program. This program 



provides grant funds to 
groups that have estab- 
lished annual litter collec- 
tion events to improve 
water quality local rivers, 
streams and lakes. FWA has 
15 lakes and 45 miles of 
river in its jurisdiction. 

Volunteers are asked to 
register by calling the FWA 
at (847) 587-8540, ext. 106, by 
email at schroeder.jean 
@foxwaterway.org, or by 
downloading a registration 
form off the Web site at 
www.foxwaterway.org. 

Registration is required 
in order to receive the the 
special garbage bags that 
must be used for debris pro- 
posal. Garbage not in the 
special bags cannot be 
accepted. Registered partic- 
ipants will receive an 
appreciation gift along with 
a chance to win a raffle 
prize. 



»Neighbors 




Bob Schneider 
of Antioch 

I grew up In; 

Antioch 

My family: 

Wife, Kim; children, Hilary, 18; 

Brandon, 14 

Occupation: 

Office manager 

I graduated from: 

Antioch Community High School 

Hobbies: 

Boating 

Last good movie you saw: 

"The Holiday" 

My favorite band or music right 
now: 

BillyJoel 

Last good book I read: 

Harry Potter 

Favorite restaurants: 

Harbour Club, Pizano's, Dover Straights 

Favorite meal: 

Meat loaf 

If I could have one super power, It 
would be: 

Super speed, to get more done 

What's your dream car? 

Rolls Hoyce Silver Cloud 

My dream vacation is: 

[To travel] around the world 



• If you have a "Neighbor" whom we 

should profile in this column, call the 

Lake County Journals at (847) 223-8161, 

or e-mail antioch@weeklyjoumals.com. 



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■ Page 6A- April 27, 2007 AN/LV 



IMMUNITY. 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 






Muskie hunters, lovers 
make their way to Antioch 



ANTIOCH - The muskios 
are back. 

Well, really, they've been in 
the Chain of Lakes for a 
while, but those who both love 
and hunt the massive fish will 
be back in town for the 
Professional Musky 

Tournament Trail's 2007 
Qualifying Event. 

The village and the 
Antioch Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry are 
the hosts, and the Dcst 
Western Regency Hotel and 



Antioch Veterans of Foreign 
Wars will be the contest head- 
quarters. 

Muskie hunters will con- 
verge upon the town on April 
28 and 29. 

Fishers will be arranged 
into 150 two-person teams, 
and the team that catches the 
biggest muskie wins $50,000 
in cash and prizes. 

Contact the Department of 
Community Services at (847) 
305-63'12 for more informa- 
tion. 



Brief event schedule 

Saturday, April 28: 
7 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Fishing on the 
Chain 

6 p.m. ( Antioch VFW, 75 North 
Ave.: Virtual weigh-ins. 

Sunday, April 29: 

7 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Fishing on the 
Chain 

3 p.m. Antioch VFW, 75 North 
Ave.: Virtual weigh-ins and award 
ceremony, open to the public. 



District brainstorms next step 

Referendum failure has officials looking for more options 



By TARA CLIFTON 
tclifton@nwnGwsgroup.com 

ANTIOCH - Many officials 
and volunteers in School 
District 3*1 are still smarting 
from last week"s referendum 
loss, but plans for the future 
are already forming. 

A volunteer committee will 
meet on Monday, May 7, to dis- 
cuss changing school bound- 
aries to distribute the student 
population more evenly, said 
Superintendent Scott 

Thompson. 

He doesn't expect parents 
to be fans of the plan. 

"I don't even like it," he 
said. "I prefer kids to stay at 
the school they're comfortable 
at." 

But the ' district doesn't 
have many options right now, 
Thompson said. 

On Tuesday, April 17, 2,615 
residents out of 4,826 voted 
against letting the district 
borrow $46.95 million to build 
two new schools. 

If the referendum had 
passed, those who own a 
$200,000 home would have 
paid an extra $120 a year in 
taxes, while those who have 
$300,000 homes would have 
paid an extra $180 a year. 

A similar referendum also 
failed in March 2006. 

Officials had hoped that 



the new buildings would case 
the district's overpopulation 
problems. Total district 
enrollment is 3,072, but the 
schools are designed to hold 
2,730. Sixteen mobile class- 
rooms are used to handle the 
overflow of students, but 
many staffers and parents 
worry about children's safety 
when traveling from the 
mobile to the school. 

Officials are oven more 
worried about the future. The 
district estimates that 900 
more students will enroll by 
2011. 

Thompson said that anoth- 
er referendum will be placed 
on a future ballot, but no one 
is sure which election that 
will be. 

The soonest a referendum 
can be decided upon again is 
during the presidential pri- 
mary, tentatively scheduled 
for Feb. 5, 2008. 

Brent Bluthardt, who 
belonged to the Exploding 
Growth Task Force for the dis- 
trict, said that officials need 
to immediately campaign for 
the next referendum. 
Bluthardt will serve on the 
boundaries committee. 

"Moving forward, we're 
going to need to build these 
schools, so we need to put this 
in every election until it's 
passed," Bluthardt said. "We 



need to keep it going, hound 
it. We need to help these kids." 

Bluthardt said he suspects 
that voters will want to see a 
tweaked proposal, such as 
asking for only one school. 

Thompson said that the 
school board will soon discuss 
which route to take. 

And Tracy Campbell, who 
belonged to the pro-referen- 
dum D34 Citizens for 
Children, is gearing up to 
plug in yard signs and visit 
homes again. 

"We will definitely be a 
force in the next campaign," 
Campbell said. "We have to be 
a part of process." 

Some have called for the 
school board to be involved in 
campaign efforts, but 
Campbell said that state law 
prohibits them from doing so. 

Thompson said officials 
will have to rely upon the 
community. 

"Our only recourse to build 
new schools is through the 
issuance of bonds approved 
by the voters," Thompson 
wrote in a press release. "It is 
difficult to communicate the 
dire need for these buildings. 
They are not a luxury; they 
are a necessity. 

"The need will not go away 
or diminish; it will only 
become greater and have 
more impact." 



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Waukegan teen dies in car accident 



ByMATTPERA 

mper3@nwncwsgroup.com 

GURNEE - A 14-year-old 
Waukegan boy is being hold 
for reckless homicide after a 
car he was driving crashed, 
killing his passenger. 

Juan Castro, ' 15, of 
Waukegan, was pronounced 
dead at 5:45 a.m. on the morn- 
ing of April 22 at the scene of 
the accident in Gurneo, 
according to Lake County 
Coroner Richard Keller. The 
cause of death was deter- 
mined to be a head injury. 

Castro was a student at 
North Shore Academy in Zion. 

The crash took place on the 
Washington Street ramp head- 
ing toward the northbound 
lanes of U.S. Route 41, Gurnee 
Police Department Cmdr. Jay 
Patrick said. He added that 
the accident was alcohol relat- 
ed. 

The car, a 1996 Saturn sta- 



tion wagon, wont off the 
ramp, rolled onto its side, and 
the roof struck a utility pole, 
Patrick said. 

The vehicle belonged to the 
boyfriend of the driver's sis- 
ter, Patrick said. The owner of 
the car said the boys had 
taken the vehicle without per- 
mission. 

The driver was airlifted 
from the scene of the accident 
to Advocate Lutheran General 
Hospital in Park Ridge, where 
he was later released and 
taken into custody by Gurnee 
police. 

Because he is a minor, the 
name of the boy is not being 
released. He is currently at 
Robert W. Depke Juvenile 
Justice Complex in Vernon 
Hills, Patrick said. 

The state's attorney's office 
approved the charges of reck- 
less homicide, though it has 
not been determined whether 
the boy will be charged as an 



adult or a minor, Patrick said. 
Other charges are pending. 

While the driver's blood 
was screened for blood-alco- 
hol content at Advocate, the 
results were not being 
released by press time, Patrick 
said. He added that an open 40- 
ounce bottle of beer was found 
in the car after the crash. 

Keller, said that Castro's 
BAG registered at 0.09, one 
point above the legal limit for 
someone 21 years of age or 
older. 

The boy who was driving 
admitted to police that he and 
Castro had been drinking the 
night of the accident. He also 
told investigators that his rec- 
ollection of events leading up 
to the crash were hazy, Patrick 
said. 

"The driver didn't remem- 
ber a lot leading up to the acci- 
dent," Patrick said. "So 1 don't 
even know that he knew 
where they were going." 



»PoliceBeat 

People named here have only been 

charged with these crimes, not 

convicted. Information In Police Beat 

comes from heal police records. 



ANTIOCH 

DU1 

Edward W. Gunderlash, 35, 
14000 block of- Enclave Lakes 
Drive, Delray Beach, Fla., driving 
under the influence, two counts 
of failure to- signal when neces- 
sary, improper lane use, April 
23. 

Kietha M. Zemouri, 48, 3600 
block of West Oakdale, Chicago, 
driving under the influence, 
driving with an obstructed 
windshield, driving without 
insurance, DUI with a blood 
alcohol content of more than 
0.08, driving with a suspended 
license, April 16. 

Suspended license 
Alexis D. Gitmore, 48, 900 
block of Barnhart Court, Zion, 
driving with a suspended 
license, speeding, April 19. 

Michael J. Lamont,-52, 39000 

block of Route 59, Lake Villa, 
driving with a suspended . 
license, ran a stop light, April 
18. 

Attempted theft 

Latasha D. Edwards, 35, 
38000 block of North Wilson 
Road, Beach Park, April 6. 

No valid license 

Hector 0. Garduno, 27, 42000 
block of North Forest, Antioch, 
driving without a valid license, 
driving without headlights on 
when necessary, April 18. 

Revoked license 

Michael C. Federicksen, 31, 
5800 block of West Diversey 
Avenue, Chicago, driving with a 
revoked license, speeding, April 
16. 

LAKE VILLA 

No license 
Marcos M. Manjarrez, 20, 818 



N. 20th Ave., Melrose Ave., driv- 
ing without a license, April 17. 

Suspended license 

Kenneth F. Costello, 53, 27601 
W. Sullivan Lake Road, Volo, 
driving with a suspended 
license, driving with a faulty 
exhaust system, driving with 
suspended registration, April 
14. 

LINDENHURST 

Suspended license 

Isaac D. Martinez, 20, 39057 
N. Poplar, Lake Villa, driving 
with a suspended license, 
speeding, driving with improper 
lighting, April 16. 

Kristoffer M. Kelley, 30, 803 
McAlister, Waukegan, driving 
with a suspended license, 
wanted on three in-state war- 
rants, April 18. 

Terry W.Bilyeu, 48, 40352 N. 
Lake Shore Drive, Antioch, driv- 
ing with a suspended license, 
April 18. 

Elizabeth Spann, 58, 3317 W. ' 
Tulip Drive, Hazel Crest, driving 
with a suspended license, driv- 
ing with suspended registra- 
tion, April 19. 

Carlos H. Zelaya, 42, 4255 
Greenleaf, Waukegan, driving 
with a suspended license, ran a 
stop sign, driving without proof 
of insurance, April 22. 

DUI 

Aaron F. Raftery, 25, 593 
Crosswind Lane, Lindenhurst, 
driving under the influence, 
improper lane use, failure to 
yield to an emergency vehicle, 
DUI with a blood alcohol con- 
tent of more than 0.08, driving 
without proof of insurance, 
April 22. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

Gang contact 

Diego A. Ocampo, 17, 1415 
Chestnut, Round Lake Beach, 



CALLING ALL SENIORS 



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-»iO 



■-- THURSDAY • May 3rd • 11AM 




'■'hmvv Senior adults making a difference for 
Northern Illinois & Southern Wisconsin 



Host: Dr. George Sweeting 

Guest: Chaplain of the 
Chicago Bears 

Harry Swayne 

Harry played for 16 years 
in the NFL 




rV'UlUj.lV" 

; Lunch & ,; program wid'forjby; free-will offering. 



Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church 
43 W. Grass Lake Kd , Lake Villa, IL (>004h 



unlawful street gang contact, 
April 19. 

Obstruction 

Percy E. Rosales, 33, 5880 
Delaware, Gurnee, obstruction, 
disorderly conduct, April 21. 

Marijuana 
Joshua A. Casarez, 18, 202 W. 
Clarendon, Round Lake Beach, 
possession of marijuana, pos- 
session of a handgun without 
the requisite F0ID, April 18. 

Gaspar Ponce, 20, 1425 North 
Ave,. Round Lake Beach, 
unlawful possession of mari- 
juana, April 20. 

Jesus Chihuahua, 18, 2359 N. 
Lenox, Round Lake Beach, pos- 
session "of marijuana, April 20. 

• * + 

Retail theft 

Hermina Olvera, 44, 1610 
North Channel, Round Lake 
Beach, retail theft, April 18. 

A 16-year-old female, retail 
theft, April 21. She was 
released to her parents. 

Anamaria Dominguez, 52, 
405 Cedar Crest Court, Round 
Lake, retail theft, April 21. 

Underage drinking 
Antonio Ayala, 20, 110 W 
Bighorn, Hainesville, underage 
drinking and resisting a peace 
officer, April 19. 

Forgery 

Lisa M. Stang, 20, 934 W. 
Rollins Road, Round Lake 
Heights, forgery, April 20. 

Weapon 
Anthony D. Bueche, 18, 1001 
Ronald Terrace, Round Lake 
Beach, unauthorized use of a 
weapon, possession of drug 
paraphernalia, and possession 
of marijuana, April 20. 

DUI 

Gabriel Mendez, 25, Lake 
Geneva, Wis., driving under the 
influence, April 20. 

. Christian J. Irizarry, 31, 812 
Buena Vista, Round Lake 
Beach, driving under the influ- 
ence, April 23. 

Domestic battery 

Cesar Martinez-Celi, 26, 1101 
Fairfield, Round Lake Beach, 
domestic battery, April 21, 

Hit and run 

Jesus Tapia-Garcia, 19, 234 
Lem Drive, Round Lake, hit and 
run, obstructing a peace offi- 
cer, April 23. 

FOX LAKE 

Damage to vehicle 

Fox Lake police received a 
report of damage being done 
to a vehicle April 21 at 30 
block of Poplar Avenue, Fox ' 
Lake. 

A Fox Lake resident told 
police that. someone stole a 
Sirrus radio receiver, worth 
$50, AprlllS. 



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Lake County Journals/ LakeCountyJournals.com 



iDMMUNIH 



AN/LV April 27, 2007* Page 7A 



Young Cubbie takes part in historical anniversary 

Student serves as bat boy 
during Jackie Robinson 
commemorative game 



By HELEN MANSFIELD 

hmnnsfiold@nwncwsgroup,com 

THIRD LAKE - April 15 has gone 
down in history as a big day in baseball. 

This year, Academy Award winner 
Jennifer Hudson sang the National 
Anthem at Dodgers Stadium, and play- 
ers throughout the league wore special 
jerseys with the number "42" on them. 
Similar events took place in ball parks 
all across the country, commemorating 
the 60th anniversary of Jackie 
Robinson's breaking the sport's color 
barrier. 

If you can imagine it, it was an even 
bigger day for 11-year-old Ismael 
Gonzalez of Third Lake. 

The Cubs didn't win in their matchup 
with the Milwaukee Brewers, but Ismael 
was in baseball nirvana nevertheless. 

Earlier this year, Ismael's mom, Tesl 
Carrera, and dad, Dan Gonzalez, found 
out that one of their three boys had the 
opportunity to serve as bat boy in one of 
the Cubs' first games of the season. 
Along with Ismael, the couple have 
Issac Gonzalez, 10, and Isiah Gonzalez, 
8. 

"All three of the boys fell into the age 
range," Tesi said. 

The opportunity came from Dan's 
cousin Alma Navarro. Alma is a resi- 
dent of Round Lake and has worked at 
Walgreens' corporate offices in 
Deerfield for two years. 
. Last year, she raised more than $200 
and walked in Ron Santo's Juvenile 
Diabetes Foundation Walk. Her name 
was entered to a drawing, and her name 
was pulled. She won four tickets to the 
game, and one ticket was for the "bat 
boy." 

"Since Ismael is the oldest, and my 
brother's godson, I picked him," Alma 
said. 

Tesi said the family had good seats, 
but "there was no sun, [and they] froze." 
Alma didn't attend the game, but heard 
everyone had a good time. 

Ismael is a fifth grader at Woodland 
Intermediate School. 

He recently started the baseball sea- 
son with the Grayslake Youth Baseball 
Association team, the Sand Gnats. 





Chris Padgett - cpjdgctt@HwnGwsgroup.com 

Eleven-year-old Ismael Gonzalez stands outside his home with an autographed baseball 
signed by members of the Cubs. Gonzalez was named Walgreens Celebrity Batkid during 
the Jackie Robinson memorial game at Wrigley on April 15. 

"So this was the first time the boys 
were at Wrigley," Tesl said. "They want- 
ed to see the ivy, but It was too early." 

Ismael wore a special Walgreens T- 
shirt, which he said didn't give him a lot 
of warmth when he was running 
around in the shade. 

Tesl said the family didn't know the 
significance of that particular day until 
they arrived at Wrigley Field. 

She said her brother Vince is a big 
baseball fan, and taught the boys every- 
thing they know about baseball, and 
each of them love the game. 

Tesl said a number of biographies 
about Jackie Robinson had been 
checked out of the library by the boys 
and made their way to the house for var- 
ious book reports over the years. 

"It was probably good and bad," 
Ismael said of Jackie Robinson's 
achievement. "They probably treated 
him bad because he was the first black 
player." 

Ismael received an official "bat boy" 
certificate, along with a an autographed 
ball, signed by 13 players, including 
Derrek Lee and coach Lou Pinella. 

It also was "Lou Pinella Bobble Head 
Day," so the family picked up four of 
those as well. 

His brothers weren't too Jealous of 
him. Isiah said he was happy to get 
Michael Barrett to sign his ball cap. 

"I thought it was neat," Issac said. 



Chris Padgett ■ cpadgett@fiwnewsgroup.com 

Eleven-year-old Ismael Gonzalez plays catch 
with his brothers outside his Third Lake 
home. 

Alma said the three boys are her only 
young cousins who are into baseball, 
"all the others like soccer," she said. 

Ismael is a sweet, happy boy, but he's 
very quiet and reserved. Tesi said the 
only way he shows that he's really 
happy is when he has a giant smile on 
his face. 

"It was great," Ismael said of his time 
at Wrigley "It was everything I thought 
it'd be." 

The boys have gone to several Cub's 
games, but only when the team plays the 
Brewer's In Milwaukee. Tesi said Miller 
Stadium is more family friendly than 
Wrigley, and finds that it's easier to get 
tickets there. 



Jackie Robinson's timeline 



1919 - Jan. 31: Jackie Roosevelt Robinson is born in Cairo, Georgia, the 
fifth and last child of Mallle and Jerry Robinson. 

1939 - September: Jackie Enrolls at UCLA and goes on to become the 
schools first 4-sport letterman. 

1941 - After UCLA, Jackie was hired to play semi-pro football with the 
Honolulu Bears. 

1942 - Jackie has a tryout with the Chicago White Sox. 
April 3: Jackie Is inducted Into the U.S. Army. 

1943 - Jackie earns a promotion to 2nd Lieutenant In the Army. 

1944 - April: Jackie becomes platoon leader of Company B of the 
761st. 

July 6: Jackie refused to move to the back of a military bus at Fort 
Hood, Texas. 

Aug. 2: Jackie faces a court-martial for his disobedience on July 6. He 
was acquitted on all charges. 

Nov. 28: Jackie accepts an Honorable Discharge from active duty In 
the military and returns home to California. 

1945 - Spring: Jackie joins the Negro Baseball League and plays for 
the Kansas City Monarchs. 

April 16: Jackie has a tryout with the Boston Red Sox. Neither the 
manager nor the players showed up for Jackie's "tryout." 

Aug. 28: Jackie meets with Branch Rickey of the Dodgers and agrees 
to join the Dodger Organization. 

Oct. 23: Jackie signs a contract to play with the Montreal Royals of 
the International League. He received a $3,500 bonus and $600 a 
month salary. 

1946 - Feb. 10: Jackie and Rachel Isum are married at the 
Independent Church In Los Angeles. 

Spring: Jackie and Rachel arrive in Daytona Beach for Spring Training. 
Here he meets John Wright, another African American on the Montreal 
Roster. The Montreal Royals team is locked-out of the Ballpark in 
Sanford because of Jackie and John's presence on the team. 

Jackie plays his first professional baseball game for the Montreal 
Royals at Roosevelt Stadium In Jersey City, New Jersey. Jackie finished 
the year as the International League batting champion, compiling a 
.349 average in 124 games. 

Nov. 18: Jackie Robinson and Rachel have their first child, Jackie 
Robinson Jr. 

1947 - Feb.: Both the Dodgers and the Montreal Royals have their 
spring training in Havana, Cuba. 

' April 10: The Brooklyn Dodgers announce the purchase of the con- 
tract of Jack Roosevelt Robinson from Montreal. 

April 15: Jackie makes his big-league debut against the Boston Braves 
at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn. On this day, Jackie grounds out against 
Johnny Sain in his first at-bat. He goes 0-3 and scores a run. 

May 9: A strike threatened by the St.Louis Cardinals is abruptly ' 
stopped by National League President Ford Frick. 

Sept. 23: With Permission for the Dodgers, Jackie's admirers stage a 
Jackie Robinson Day for him at Ebbets Field. 

October: Jackie is voted the first ever major league Rookie of the 
Year. Two years later they would give one to a member of each league. 
Jackie also finished fifth in the National League's Most Valuable Player 
voting. 

1949 - July 12: Jackie joins Roy Campanella, Don Newcombe and 
Larry Doby as the first African Americans to play in an All Star Game. 

July 18: Jackie testifies before the House Un-American Activities 
Committee about the role of blacks in the military. 

October Jackie is named the National League Most Valuable Player. 
He wins the batting title by batting .342, with 203 hits, 124 RBI's and 37 
stolen bases. 

• lnforniationprovldedbyMLB.com. 



Early June hearing expected 
for Round Lake hospital 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

FOX LAKE - Fox Lake 
Chamber of Commerce and 
Industry leaders learned of 
key dates this summer for the 
Illinois Health Systems 
Planning Board decision on 
where to locate a new hospital 
in Lake County. 

Tuesday, June 5, is the first 
such date, as the IHSPB plans 
to hold a public hearing at 
Round Lake Beach Civic 
Center. The hearing for 
Advocate Health Care's will 
last from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. A 
late August meeting of the 
state board to consider the 
proposals 

Advocate Health Care rep- 
resentative Steve Sundberg 
said that the hospital organi- 
zation is optimistic its plan 
will be accepted, for the site at 
Route 120 and Wilson Road. 
"Gaining the local support we 
have is huge," Sundberg told 
local business leaders. 

"Our site will reduce the 
travel time significantly," 
Steve Sundberg, Advocate's 
new market director, said. 
"We believe in quality patient 



care; that is what we are all 
about. We're one of a few per- 
centage of hospitals who have 
earned the rank of magnet for 
recognition of nursing staff, 
and provide the best care. We 
are much about the sharing of 
the best practices in the field 
with other facilities of ours." 

Sundberg mentioned such 
advances as Electronic ICU, 
which can monitor critically 
ill patients, as a doctor and 
nurse watch over care given.* 
24 hours a day. 

The IHSPB might choose 
the Advocate plan or a hospi- 
tal plan proposed by Vista 
Health Systems. 

Sundberg said that the two 
organizations are vastly dif- 
ferent, one is for-profit, while 
Advocate is faith-based. He 
said it was "very remote" that 
both plans would be 
approved. 

"If we are not approved, or 
both are rejected, then we still 
plan to build a professional 
office building," Sundberg 
said. 

Advocate Health Care, 
which consists of several hos- 
pitals in the Chicago area, is 



in direct competition with 
Vista. Advocate announced 
plans in January for a 144- 
bed, 300-square foot hospital 
that officials hope will be 
approved to be built in Round 
Lake, less than 10 miles from 
the proposed Vista site. 

The Round Lake site would 
be a trauma level n, on 57 
acres, at an overall cost esti- 
mate of $230 million, and be 
designated as a U.S. Green 
Building Council by 
Leadership in Energy and 
Environmental Design. 

Advocate also operates Good 
Shepherd Hospital in 
Barrington and Lutheran 
General Hospital in Park 
Ridge. 

Resolutions of support for 
the Advocate Health Care 
plan have been approved by 
the following: Beach Park, 
Round Lake Beach, 
Hainesvllle, Wauconda, Fox 
Lake, Volo, Third Lake, Lake 
Barrington, Fox Lake Fire 
Protection District, Round 
Lake Area Fire Protection 
District and Illinois State 
Senator William Peterson (R- 
Long Grove). 




Palatine Wa 

[847-2158-7100 847 



Wi? will but any compelilor's eslimate by up lo $500, GUARANTEED 



District chooses new AES leader 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

ANTIOCH - With Deborah Harding retiring 
at the end of this school year, School District 34 
officials recently named a new principal for 
Antioch Elementary School. 

The board appointed Judy Hamilton during 
its April 17 board meeting. She will assume her 
role on July 1. 

Hamilton was chosen from a pool of 64 
applicants, according to a district press 



release'. She comes from Hart School in North 
Chicago where she served as principal for the 
past 2 years. Before taking on an administra- 
tive position, she taught elementary students 
and served as the district's facilitator for the 
"Success for All" reading program. 

She holds a bachelor's degree in elementary 
education from Barat College and a master's 
degree in educational administration from 
National Louis University. 

Hamilton lives in Gurnee with her husband. 




i ft llllAtiAAAA14fA^ ^AA.Qy^JMLJ^^^M^^J^AAA, 



All Temp Heating and Air Conditioning is family owned & operated and 
has been serving our area since 1946. In 2006 we were awarded the 
Lennox 25 Year Service & Centurion Dealer Award & York's Midwest 
Largest Patriot Dealer of The Year Award! We carry only the top brands 
of equipment, such as Lennox and York, who back up their products with 
the Good Housekeeping 2-Year 100% Money Back Guarantee. 

One way we strive for excellence is to follow up every installation with a 
Quality Inspection performed by one of our senior technicians. This 
allows our customers to ask any questions about their new comfort 
systems as we inspect for 1 00% satisfaction. 

We also set ourselves apart by including a special guarantee on new 
equipment. If your compressor fails within the first 5 years we will replace 
the en tire air conditioner, not jus t the compressor. If your heat exchanger 

fails during the first 10 years we will 
replace your entire furnace, not just 
the heat exchanger. 

For a free estimate give us a 
call 847-526-9082 



* *- * ■*,*.*.*.-»v+A*i*A* 



Jh V ,*.. -V V. 



-» S V V 



Page 8A • April 27, 2007 ANAV 



AROUND TOWN 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



Alcoholic's Anonymous meetings. 
Several meetings throughout Lake 
County on a daily basis. Call (847) 362- 
1811 or visit www.districtlOnia.org for 
meeting information. 

ANTIOCH 

• German-American Club of 
Anlioch Spring Dinner Dance. 

Saturday, May 5; doors open at 5 p.rn., 
dinner at 6 p.m., dancing at 7 p.m. VFW 
Hall, 130 L Grand Ave. In Lake Villa. 
Reservations required by April 28, For 
more information or reservations, call 
Dorothy at (847) 356-5484. 

• Antioch Network of Friends 
meeting. 7 p.m., first Tuesdays. 
Community Building, 884 Main St., back 
entrance. A multiple sclerosis support 
group. Call Louise at (847) 395-1317 or 
Rachel at (847) 973-1808 for details. 

• AFFTER (Advocates for 
Fibromyalgia Funding, Treatment 
Education and Research) support 
group meeting. 10 a.m.-noon, first 
Saturdays. Antioch's Community Building, 
884 Main St. Call (847) 3G2-7807 or go to 
www.AFFTER.org for more Information. 

• Krwanls Club of Antioch meet- 
ing. Noon, Tuesdays. Pctrucci's Italian 
Market & Cafe, 311 Depot St. Contact 
Melissa at (847) 489-8044, e-mail at 
mjrigoni a hotmnil.com, or Larry Mondie 
at (847) 650-9530, email at 
brscoops@aol.com for more information. 



■ Antioch Jaycccs meeting. 7:30 
p.m., last Mondays. Regency Inn, For 
more Information, call (847) 395-8035, 

• The Meeting House Museum. 11 
a.m,-3 p.m., first Saturdays. See original 
photos of Antioch and a veterans' exhibit 
of photos and memorabilia from the Civil 
War through the Gulf War. 

• Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club Adopt-A-Hlghway meeting. 10 
a.m., Sunday, May 6. Clubhouse, one-half 
mile south of Rl. 173 on east side of Rt. 
83. For more information, call (847) 395- 
N ICC or visit www.lakc-online.conVhicc. 

• Antique Bottle Club of Northern 
Illinois. 7:30 p.m., first Wednesdays. 
Antioch Senior Center, 817 Holbek Dr, 

• Antioch Garden Club meeting. 
6:45 p.m., Monday, May 1. United 
Methodist Church, 848 Main St. All are 
welcome. Call Debbie at (847) 395-4699 
to learn more. 

• Northern Lake County Quitters 
Guild meeting. 7 p.m., first 
Wednesdays. Antioch Township Center 
on Deep Lake Rd. north of Grass Lake Rd. 
Call Madelyn Anderson at (847) 651- 
8349 to learn more. 

CRYSTAL LAKE 

• Crystal Lake Toastmasters Club 
meeting. 8-10 a.m., first and third 
Saturdays at Amcore Bank Building, Rt. 
14 and Pingree Rd. Develop your presen- 
tation and leadership skills. For informa- 



tion, call Steve at (847) 526-1525 or visit 
http/AisermcnotZ-toasll. 

FOX LAKE 

• ArtWorks Children's Museum 
ArtNlght Gala Fundraiser. 5:30-9:30 
run., Saturday, April 28. Maravela's, 4 S. 
Washington St. Tickets are $55 per per- 
son, $400 for a table of 8. Silent and live 
auctions, artist demonstrations, perform- 
ances and art displays. For tickets or 
Information, call Linda at (847) 208-2237. 

GRAYSLAKE 
•30th Annual Guest Artist 
Concert. 4 p.m., Sunday, April 29. 
College of Lake County, James Lumber 
Center for the Performing Arts, 
Mainstage Theatre, 19351 W. Washington 
St. Steve Cohen plays with the CLC Wind 
Ensemble, and Conrad Hcrwig plays with 
the CLC Monday Night Jazz Ensemble. 
Tickets are $6 for the general public and 
$5 for CLC students, alumni and seniors, 
and arc available at the CLC Box Office, 
by phone at (847) 543-2300 or online at 
www.clcillinois.edu/tlckets. 

• Spring Art Sate. 9 a.m.-9 p.m., 
Tuesday and Wednesday, May 1-2. 
College of Lake County, ARTcetera Sales 
and Rental Gallery, next to Robert T. 
Wright Community Gallery of Art, 
Learning Resource Center, 19351 W. 
Washington St. For more information, call 
Donn Sands at (847) 543-2405. 



• CLC Concert Band's 10th 
Anniversary Concert. 7:30 p.m., 
Thursday, May 3. College of Lake County, 
Mainstage Theatre of the James Lumber 
Center for the Performing Arts, 19351 W. 
Washington St. Tickets are $5 for the 
general public, $4 for seniors and CLC 
students and staff. Tickets arc available 
at the CLC Box Office, by phone at (847) 
543-2300 or online at 
www.clcillinois.edu/tlckets, 

• Kathy Mattea concert. 8 p.m., 
Friday, May 4. College of Lake County, 
Mainstage Theatre, James Lumber Center 
for the Performing Arts, 19351 W. 
Washington St. Tickets are $31-$36 for 
the public, $16 for CLC students, and $13 
for children under 12. Tickets are avail- 
able at the CLC Box Office, by calling 
(847) 543-2300, or by visiting 
www.clcllIinols.edu/tickets. 

• Save-A-Pet 21st Annual "Tuxedos 
for Tails" fundraiser. 5:30 p.m., 
Saturday, May 5. The Stonegate, 2401 W. 
Higglns Rd. in Hoffman Estates. Tickets 
arc $100. Silent and live auctions, hors 
d'ouevres, open bar, dancing. For tickets, 
call (847) 740-7788 or e-mail informa- 
tion (®save-apet-il.org. 

• National Alliance for the 
Mentally 111 of Lake County general 
meeting. 7 p.m., first Wednesdays. State 
Bank of the Lakes, 50 Commerce Dr. 
Families, friends, consumers and those 
Interested in learning more about mental 



The Friends of the Fox Lake Library 



USED BOOK SALE 



Friday, April 27 
9:30am to 8:00pm 

Saturday, April 28 
9:30am to 4:00pm 

Sunday, April 29 

$2.00 Bag Day 
1 :OOpm to 4:00pm 





255 E. Grand Ave. Fox Lake, Illinois 60020 

847-587-0198 




illness, treatment and recovery are wel- 
come to attend. 

GURNEE 

• Lake County Adult Learning 
Connection volunteer orientation. 7 

p.m., Wednesday, May 2. Warren-Newport 
Public Library, 224 N. O'Plalne Rd. Those 
Interested In tutoring in the adult literacy 
program are Invited to attend. For more 
Information or to register, call Iris at (847) 
543-2024 or (847) 543-2327. 

• Lake County Camera Club meet- 
ing. 6:30 pm, peer-to-peer discussion 
and socializing; 7:30 pm, meeting, first 
Fridays. Warren Township Center, oast 
crafts room, In park on southwest corner 
of Almond and Washington. All skill lev- 
els, digital and film, welcome. Call Mike 
Ament at (847) 356-6937 (noon-6 p.m.) 
to learn more, ( NOT July or Aug.) 

LAKE FOREST 

• North Suburban Symphony 
Youth Concert. 4 p.m., Sunday, May 6. 
Gorton Center, 400 H Illinois Rd. Tickets 
are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and 
students, and children under 12 free with 
paid adult. For Information or reserva- 
tions, call (847) 234-4150. 

LAKE VILLA 

• Prince of Peace Rummage Sale. 

June 14-15, Prince of Peace Parish, 135 S. 
Milwaukee Ave. Will accept any working 
vehicles, electronics, computers, appli- 
ances and furniture. For donation pick-up, 
call (847) 356-6111, ext. 509. For more 
Information, call Kevin Hanrahan at (847) 
612-1818. 

• Northern Lake County Quitters' 
Guild Quilt Show. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., 
Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29. Lakes 
Community High School, comer of Grass 
Lake Rd., east of Deep Lake Rd. 
Admission $4. For more information, call 
Madelyn Anderson at (847) 651-8349 or 
visit www.nlcqg.org 

• German-American Club of 
Antioch Spring Dinner Dance. 
Saturday, May 5; doors open at 5 p.m., 
dinner at 6 p.m., dancing at 7 p.m. VFW 
Hall, 130 E. Grand Ave. Reservations 
required by April 28. For more informa- 
tion or reservations, call Dorothy at (847) 
356-5484. 

• Lake Villa Plan Commission 
meeting. 7:30 p.m., first Wednesdays. 

■ Lake Villa Township AARP 
Chapter 3978 board meeting. 10:30 
a.m., first Thursdays. Township Offices. 

•MOMS Club of Lake 
VUla/Lindenhurst meeting. 9:30 
a.m., Mondays. Lake Villa District 
Library, 1001 Grand Ave. Children 
welcome. For more information, call 
Erin Bearss at (847) 546-1545. 

LINDENHURST 

• Lindenhurst Planning 
Commission meeting. 7 p.m., first and 



third Wednesdays. Village Hall Board 
Room, 2301 E. Sand Lake Rd. Call (847) 
356-8252 to learn more. 

• Lindenhurst Sanitary District 
meeting. 7:30 p.m., first Thursdays. 
Village Hall. Call (847) 356-8252 to learn 
more. 

• Free blood pressure screening. 8 
a.m.-noon, Mondays, The Village at 
Victory Lakes Continuing Care Center, 
Call (847) 356-5900 to learn more. 

• Lindcnhurst/Lakes Area Kiwanls 
Club meeting. 7:30-8:30 a.m., first and 
third Thursdays. Victory Lakes Continuing 
Care Center. For information, call (847) 
356-7912. 

• American Sewing Guild group, 
"Running in Stitches," meeting. 7 
p.m., first Thursdays. State Bank of the 
Lakes, Grand Ave. Call Mary Petit at (847) 
356-9242 or Janet at (847) 265-7932 for 
additional Information. 

MUNDELEIN 

• Sitzmark Ski Club meeting. 8 
p.m., first and third Wednesdays. El Barrio 
Restaurant, 1122 Diamond Lake Rd. Year- 
round activities. Call Kevin at (847) 548- 
2991 or visit www.sitzmarkskiclubxom 
to learn more. 

• Wood Carving Club meeting. 2-5 
p.m., first and third Tuesdays. Community 
Protestant Church, 418 N. Prairie. Call 
(847) 623-2072 for details. 

THIRD LAKE 

• Lake County H.O.U.S.E. (Home- 
Oriented Unique Schooling 
Experience) activity meeting for 
children. 1 p.m., first Wednesdays. St. 
Czar Lazar Church (no affiliation), 35240 
N. Grant St., Third Lake (off Rt. 45 just 
south of Rollins Rd.) Call April Lee at 
(847) 949-0758 to learn more. 

VERNON HILLS 

• "Back in Action" free back-pain 
clinic. 10-11:30 a.m., Saturday, May 5. 
Chicago Institute of Neurosurgery and 
Neuroresearcti, 565 Lakevlew Pkwy, 
Andrea Metcalf will present tips and 
core-strengthening exercises. For more 
information or to make a reservation, call 
(773) 250-1009 or visit www.cinn.org. 

WAUKEGAN 

• Waukegan BMX monthly meet- 
ing. 7 p.m., Thursday, May 3. Henry Pfau 
Callahan Park, 2785 Yorkhouse Rd. For 
more information, call (847) 363-5284 or 
visit www.waukeganbmx.com. 

• Lake County Coin Club meeting. 
7:30 p.m., first Tuesdays. Jester's Lounge, 
1500 Lewis Ave. Call Les at (847) 662- 
1955 to learn more. 

• To submit an item to the 
Calendar, e-mail to 
wjcalcndar@wecklyjournals.com, 
phone (847) 223-8161 

or fax (847) 223-8810 at least 
14 days before the event. 



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You Cannot Beat The HOBO Price! 






'■?V-..-- 



6' -7' EMERALD 
GREEN ARBORVITAE 





Only Availabia At Wo si Altis, Joliol & Waukegan Locations. 
Whilo Supplies Last! 



dim I (mil 



GAS GRILL 



% 



36,000 BTU 

With 

8,000 BTU 

Side Burner 



14" HANGING BASKET 



I 



i"! 12" x 12" VINYL TILE 

2 Styles • 45 Pieces Per Box 

4™& '§■?*. Sq. Ft. 



10' x 10' GAZEBOS 




2 Decorative Shelves • Includes Netting 
Assorted Styles Available 



iirriTTffirn ii 

l$CA99 



Easy-Up 

Portable & Assembles In Minutest 




SHAGGEDY SHAG AREA RUGS 

60" x 90" Room Rug & 
FREE 21" x 34" Entrance Rug 




1" VINYL MINI-BUNDS 



R 



Room Darkening 

WIDTHS FROM: SALE 

17" -29" *2:.. SIS 

30" -47" *5.99 

48" -72" *7.S>St 

75" -98" "^99! 

Available Lengths: 36", 48", 60", 72" & 84' 
White or Alabaster 

j _. Soloclion May Vary By Location 



f9£ 





OXY CLEAN TUB 

8 Lb. %&>&' 



STANDARD TOILET 

White Round $ 



Seal Sold Soparaloly 




L2HSJ REGENT 

LAMINATE 
FLOORING 

SALE I Sq.Ft. 

8.3MM 

Savannah and Rustic Pine Finishes 
23.1 Sq. Ft. Per Carton • 25 Year Warranty 

Wood Grain Texture • Random Lengths 
Unilin Locking System • Beveled Edges 



au. Mtcurje; 



HANDPAINTED VANITIES -£ i= jsbv 



38" Single Bowl 




Cherry Finish with 
Black Granite Top 



* 




48" Single Bowl 

Cream/Brown Finish 
with Black Granite Top 



$; 



3 8 G 



Ate 



ALSO AVAILABLE 






36" Cream Finish Single Bowl 48" Vintage Brown Single Bowl 
SALE $ 4 3 1 SALE $ 4 4 9 

Fnucols Extra ■ 



ALL WHIRLPOOLS 




OPP WHIRLPOOL 

32" x 60" 'White* 6 Jets 
Starting At... 



1.0% OFF 

ALL STEEL EXTERIOR DOORS 



10% OFF ALL 

MMMK FIBERGLASS LADDERS 




24" FIBERGLASS 
EXTENSION LADDER 

Type 1 A - 300 Lb. Rating 

*1 



SALE 

While Supplies Last! 

Selection May Vary By Location. 



KETER 2-IN-1 TOOLBOX 

19"&12.5"Toolbox 



Reg. $9.99 



RAZOR BACK 18" LAWN RAKE 




Steel Tines 

54" Aluminum 

Handle 



$;. 



SHOVELS 

Round or Square Point 

$;E99 



SALE 




CHILLIN' SOUNDS 

AIWFM Stereo and Cooler 

Rag. S29.99 'While Supplies Last! 




HOME OWNERS BARGAIN OUTLET 



For A Complete Listing of Store Addresses & Directions, 
Visit our web site at www.tioboonline.com 

Each HOBO Store is Owned and Operated by a Separate Affiliated Entity. 



VILLA PARK 
!S0 W. North Avenui 

Bolwaon 1-355 
and 

Route 83 



races good 

lwtussn? 

OR WHILE 
QUANTITIES LAST, 



- JOLIET - 
Corner of Rt. 30 
Larkln 

Rt. 30 (Plain/told Rd.) 

Larkln (Becomes Weber 

Rd. N. o! Store) 



-WAUKEGAN 
2650 Belvldere Rd. 

1/2 Btk East of 

Green Bay Rd. 

on Rt. 120 



CHICAGO 



4052 W. Grand 
Avenue 

Special 
Early Hours 



STORE HOURS: 

Mon.-Frl. 
7:00 a.m,-9;00 p.m. 

Saturday 
, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

Sunday 
9:00 a.m.-5;00 p.m." 



STORE HOURS *all except Chicago: Mon.-Frt. 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.; 
Sat. 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.; Sunday 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 



NTTUM NOT « DUCT * WTWt««m&£MCtfttNO*YWUeiOCATTOK. 



"..TO. 



^ ■+ <m 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



COMMUNITY 



AN/LV April 27, 2007 • Page 9A 



»SchoblNotes 

Teachers needed 

Huntington Learning Center is 
looking for qualified and enthusi- 
astic people to teach ACT and 
SAT preparation in a one-on-one 
environment. 

The Lake Villa-based center also 
wants certified kindergarten-12th 
grade teachers to work part time. 

Candidates for test instruction 
must have strong ACT and SAT 
scores. 

The center offers flexible 
evening and weekend hours. 

Resumes should be sent to the 
attention of Amy Whitis through 
e-mail, keeneratlakevilla' 
@yahoo.com, or fax, (847) 395- 
6784. For more information, call 
(847)395-6741. 

Rummage sale 

Don't automatically throw out ■ 
unwanted items when you're 
spring cleaning. Prince of Peace 
Parish in Lake Villa needs dona- 
tions for its annual June rummage 
sale. Call the church at (847) 
356-6111 for more information. 

Kindergarten and 
preschool registration 

The Undenhurst Early Childhood 
Center is taking registration for 
its full day private kindergarten 
program for the 2007-08 school 
year. The certified program lasts 
seven hours, and class sizes aver- 
age one teacher for ten children. 

The center also is having pre- 
school registration for the next 
academic year. This program 
does not include day care. 

The First Timers Group meets 
from 9 to 11:30 a.m. on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays; 3-and-a-half to 4- 
and-a-half-year-olds meet from 
12:15 to 2:45 p.m. on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, and the pre- 
kindergarten program meets from 
9 to 11:30 a.m. and 12:15 to 2:45 
p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays, 
and Fridays. 

To register your child, call (847) 
,356-2288 or log onto 
www.weearethefuture.com. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 34 
Working kids' brains 

Registration is now underway 
for Camp Invention, which will 
take place in Antioch for the first 
ttime. 

The program is open for kids in 
grades first through sixth, and 
goes from June 25 to 29 at 
Antioch Upper Grade School. 

The camp encourages brain- 
storming to create various inven- 
tions, using science, creativity 
and teamwork. 

The cost is $199 a child, which 
includes a T-shirt and daily 



snacks. A discount of $19 a child 
is offered with the Bring A Friend 
program. The program is limited 
to 110 kids. 

Registration is due by May 31, 
or else a $20 late fee will be 
charged. For more information, 
log onto www.campinvention.org 
or call (800) 968-4332. 

Crawling art 

The Village of Antioch, the 
Antioch Chamber of Commerce, 
and the Antioch Fine Arts 
Foundation will sponsor Antioch 
Art Crawl, presented by the dis- 
trict. 

Residents wilt enjoy live music 
performance, art activities, drama 
workshops, street performers and 
more from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on 
Saturday, May 5, in downtown 
Antioch. Antioch Upper Grade 
School will present the play 
"Wishful Thinking" at 7 p.m. in 
the school's cafeteria. 

Call the village at (847) 395- 
1000 for more information. 

Old cells wanted 
Antioch Elementary School is 
once again recycling old cell 
phones. They can be donated to 
the school office through April. 
For every phone recycled, the 
school gets money for Motorola 
through a special program'. Call 
the school at (847) 838-8901 
with questions. 

AUGSdrop-ofrs 

Antioch Upper Grade School 
staffers ask parents to drop off 
their students at a different loca- 
tion in the mornings. 

Parents should use the circle 
drive-off located on the left side 
of Highview Drive right before the 
school parking lot. This way stu- 
dents can walk safely to the 
building and cars can circle 
around to reach Tiffany Road. 

A staff member will be sta- 
tioned on the sidewalk adjacent 
to the parking lot to assist stu- 
dents. 

» 

Help wanted 

Antioch Upper Grade School is 
looking for new employees. 

Energetic and enthusiastic peo- 
ple are needed to fill four part- 
time lunchroom and recess 
supervisory positions as soon as 
possible. Hourly rate is $8.24, and 
supervisors must be free to work 
two hours and 15 minutes each 
day during the lunch period. 
Those interested should fill out an 
application found on the District 
34 Web site, 

www.antioch34.com, and also fax 
a letter of interest to AUGS. 



Licensed in Illinois and Wisconsin 

Bankruptcy • Real Estate • Estate Planning 

STATELINE LEGAL, LLC 

Thomas Q. O'Brien Kayla H. Laswell 
950 Main St., Antioch, IL 60002 

847-838-1100 



Mention this ad and receive a free 30 min. phone consultation 



We h elp people file for bankruptcy under the bankruptcy code 




*hSI 



Family Owned 



- Burial Sewices 

• Cremation Services 

• Memorial Sewices 

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847-356-2146. 

Lake Villa, IL ,,| 



*Mm 



KIPS KLU* 
SUMMER CAMP 

Summer of Fun 

Cam p Highlights 

• Engaging & FUN Daily Schedule 

• Weekly Beach Field TVlp for lst-Sth grades 

• Daily Water Activites 

• Theme Weeks 

• Age Determined Groups 

Trinity Youth Services 

25519 W. Highway 134 
Ingleside, II 

847-546-1044 

Center Hours: 6am-6pm 

Serving 3 year olds through 5th grade 

Come Join The Klub! 





Principal Dimitrios J. Kallieris, 
(847) 838-8304. Kallieris can be 
reached by phone at (847) 838- 
8300. 

Substitute special education 
aides are also needed. 
Certification is not required. For 
more information, contact Carol 
Anderson at (847) 838-8421. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 41 

Lots of pennies 

Hooper School students are col- 
lecting pennies for sick kids, and 
so far the school has raised 



$685.57. 

Open House 

Palombi Middle School will have 
an open house for sixth-graders 
on Tueday, May 1. For more 
details (847) 356-2118. 

PTO Prez needed 

Hooper School is looking for a 
vice president for its Parent 
Teacher Organization. The volun- 
teer position involves meetings, 
fundraisers and more. Contact 
the school at (847) 245-8101 if 



interested, 

Substitutes needed 
The district is in need of substi- 
tute teachers. To find out more 
information, call Kathy Ney at 
(847)245-8005. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 117 

Staffers at Antioch High 
School's Tom Tom newspaper 
earned top honors in a competi- 
tion sponsored by the American 
Scholastic Press Association of 
College Point New York . 



The paper was rated "First Place 
With Special Merit," the highest 
rating possible in the annual 
event. The "Special Merit" tag 
came because the paper also 
won "Outstanding Editorial" in its 
January opinion piece, written by 
junior Garik Niffenegger. 
In addition to the special merit 
citation, the staff tallied perfect 
scores in the categories of 
"Content and Coverage," as well 
as "Creativity." 
The staff earned 955 out of a 
possible 1000 points. 




FINER 
FOODS 




STORE HOURS: 

MOM-THRU SAL 8:00-8:00 
SUN, 8:00 ■ 7:00 



WM NOW 
ACCMPT 






VISA 



JOHNSBURG, IL 

4000 G. Johnsburg Rd. 

ftl PI QM 4fil 1 Wi RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMtT QUANTmiS 
Old p*±*± Wll AND CORRECT PAIMnNG ERRORS 



SALE DATES: 

APR. 25th thru 

MAY 1st 



■ 



... 



MEAT VMS FINER FOODS SELLS ONLY USDA CHOICE OR ABOVE 




FRESH GRADE A BONE-IN 
flUBfUB 

50* 



GOV. INSPECTED ST. LOUIS 

SPARE RIBS 

$189 

1 LB. 






■1 ' ;f~*iV j 



USDA CHOICE 

T-BONE STEAK 

^F LB. 







i 



FRESH HOMEMADE 

ETAUAN SAUSAGE 

HOT OR MILD n 

$ 1 69 

II LB. 



^-~ .-■ 



**-■— ^ "t* : "; ■ ■! 'it- 



GROCERY 



CHEF BOYARDEE 

PASTA W/MEAT 

1501 

5/*4 



HUNT'S ORIGINAL 

MANWICH SAUCE 

15,501 

4 



99 



PRINCE •■•■'■ 

MOSTACCKHJ, RJGATE, 

ROTINI OR GEMElil PASTA 

1M60Z. 



59 



SCOn PETERSEN 

JUMBO HOT DOGS 

16 OZ. [EXCLUDES BEEF] 

i'i 



89 



DEAN'S 

ORANGE 
JUICE 

1/2GAU0N 




FRESH LEAN - 3 IBS. OR MORE 
GROUND CHUCK LB 

GOV. INSPECTED FULL SLAB 



$ l 



59 



29 



BABY BACK RIBS LB $ 3 

USDA CHOICE BONELESS *<»- 

SIRLOIN TOP BUTT.... 5 ^ 99 

GOV. INSPECTED BONELESS 
PORK SIRLOIN CUTLETS....LB 

USDA CHOICE SEMI-BONELESS 
RIBEYE STEAK LB 

FRESH FROZEN COOKED -41-50 CT. *^ 00 
SHRIMP... 32 0Z.PKG. 9 9" 



$|69 

$6 89 



BUMBLE BEE - OIL' OR WATER" ■■"*' 

CHUNK LITE TUNA k 

OLD EL PASO 

REFRIED BEANS : 

HUNT'S SNACK PACK 

PUDDING id 

CENTRELLA # A 

EGG NOODLES w«. OY 



CQ* BAYS 

H 

SOUR CREAM 



ENGLISH MUFFINS 6<* 

00* CENTRELLA 



89 



i BUTTER 

CRYSTAL LIGH 



"in 



ijoz. 



$]39 

....I6«.QT 

2/T 

$700 



tw iiwuilj idol w» CBYSTAUIGHT A /(*, 

■iwui in /< V DRINK MIXj*n* 2/ 7 

KETCHUP Mb..*/ v 



VAL'S IMPORTS 



POTATO GNOCCHI 

GRECO 

WHITE VINEGAR gauon 

TANNINA OR RIGA- YOUR CHOICE 

EXTRA VIRGIN $499 

OLIVE OIL idr . V 





DELI 



2l£.iSl E u .« $ | 29 DOFINO DOMESTIC SJM0 

BOILED HAM IB. 1 HAVART , CHEESE LB *2 M 

8BE...: lb. 99< £°™ ^ pU 

lANDmAKES • CORNED BEEF LB. A 

AMERICAN CHEESE lb $ 2 W "^JEffi, IR $«» 

^ CHEDDAR CHEESE.. LB. M. 

iivmSage- lb $ l 39 VAL ' S HOMEMA0E ' SI* 

KK * * p ° TAT0 5ALAD lb ■ 

feHHfe. *■„. $9*9 KRETSCHMAR i^a* 

TAVERN HAM. ... lb *3* ¥ 



HARD SALAMI.. LB 

;S§RRENT0 '■■:■■:.. 
MOZZARELLA CHEESE „lb 



STELLA - ASIAGO, FONTINELLA, ROMANO 
OR PARMESAN $4*79 

CHEESE WEDGES ...8 0Z.EA. *Z 
KRETSCHMAR $ 4ft 99 

SMOKED HAM LB. 9 Z 

ORVAL KENT AMERICAN j% g% < 

POTATO SALAD LB. IfV 

FRESH $ 1 49 

TAPIOCA PUDDING LB * it' 



LIQUOR 



.■__ i 



....IlKIOniBOIflB'O^ 



MILLER 

FLAVORED RUMS m'12" 

OLD MILWAUKEE UGHT mwM 



LEINENKUGELS ■■..■i iH «s 



:•■ 



HEAT & SERVE 



HOT DELI 



BAKERY 



■.CUBW/GMKMMONMSK" 

CHICKEN W/ONION & $0 99 
PEAS DINNER ...1B,'3" 

MACARONI W/MEAI SAUCE. . LB. A 
MARIA'S Aft 

POTATO SOUFFLE. ., A slice W 



FRESH BAKED . 

BUTTER COOKIES 

VAL'S, FRESH MADE 

MiNICANNOUS...: 

FRESH FROSTED 

BROWNIES 

VAL'S FRESH BAKED 

ITAUAN BREAD 



;..;.;.LB, H ■:; 

3/ $ 2 00 

eaW 

.:..lb: yy 



MARIA'S HOMEMADE 

ZUCCHINI PARMESAN 

UNO STYLE HOMEMADE 

BRUSCHETTA TOPPING 

MARIA'S HOMEMADE 

CHICKEN UMONE 

VAL'S HOMEMADE 

IASAGNA:;- .;.. .. 

VAL'S HOMEMADE $429 

.:;...:„., lb. v 



LB $ I" 

LB. O J 
$499 



. ..LB, 



MEATEAUW/SAUCE. 



ShopatVaPs &you1lfind Low-Low Prices Everyday!! > IJmnk You, Sat 



1 ■ n^jjtiimm 



^m+ 



iM^flflli 



lake! 

» LocalDeaths 

William M. Petersen, 71, Kenosha, Wis. 
James Edwin Brown, 63, Ubertyville 
Dorothy M. Wennersten, 85, Round Lake Park 




10A 

Edition of April 27-May 3, 2007 
LakeCountyJournals.com 




Patrick L Monahan Jr., 28, Gurnee 
Jean Marie Grischeau hink, 76, Fox Lake 
James F. Troemel, 72, Grayslake 



Ellen E. 'Betty' Schaud, 88, Round Lake Beach 

Brian Anthony Psak, 20, Round Lake Heights 

OBITUARIES ON PAGE 14A 



1 



» InBrief 

Lake County Retired Teachers 
celebrate anniversary 

The Lake County Retired Teachers 
Association (LCRTA) will celebrate 
its 50th anniversary at noon on 
Tuesday, May 8. 

The event will take place at the 
Country Squires restaurant in 
Grayslake at the corner of Route 45 
and Route 120. 

A special presentation will be 
made by Nicko Naidenov, "Keyboard 
master and songster." 

For more information, contact 
LCRTA President Joanne "Jodie" 
Stewart at (847) 433-1783. 

■Local reports 

Swedish Glee Club 
Spring Concert 

Waukegan Swedish Glee Club will 
sing a spring concert at 3 p.m. on 
May 20, at St. Mark's Lutheran 
Church, 3350 Delany Road, in 
Waukegan. 

Directed by Jeff DeLay and accom- 
panied by Ruth Porikos, the Glee 
Club will sing songs with springtime 
themes in English, as well as 
Swedish. 

Guest alto soloist will be Sheila 
Baker-Bondurant. 

The Waukegan Swedish Women's 
Chorus also will sing several songs. 

No admission charge will be made, 
but a offering will be collected for 
the benefit of C.0.0.L Food Pantry. 
■Local reports 



Free workshop reveals ways 
to slash college costs 

A workshop is being hosted for the 
parents of college bound high school 
students during the month of May at 
the Laschen Community Center in 
Vernon HlUs. 

Theworkshop will focus on tittle- 
known ways of getting money for 
college. 

The class will include topics such 
as how to double or triple eligibility 
for free grant money, the secret to 
sending a child to a private school 
for less than the cost of a four-year 
school, and a four-year school for 
less than the cost of a junior college, 
and the single biggest mistake that 
nine out of 10 parents make when 
planning for college and more. 

The workshop dates are, May 1, 
May, 5, May 22 and May 26. The 
classes are from 7:15 to 8:45 p.m. on 
weeknights and from 12:15 to 1:45 
p.m. on Saturday. The workshop will 
be taught by Don Von Ebers, one of 
the nation's leading experts on pay- 
ing for college, co-author of "How To 
Give Your Child A 4-Year College 
Education Without Going Broke," and 
a college planner specializing in 
ways for parents to fund four years 
of college for their student. 

Seating is free, but limited by the 
size of the room. To reserve a seat, 
call (847) 871-0454 and leave con- 
tact information and desired time 
and location. 

-Local Reports 



Finding hope 




Sandy Bressner - sbf essnenfi awnewsgroup.com 

Beverly Coleman waits to see a doctor at the Lake County Health Department's substance abuse program headquarters for her 
daily dose of Methadone. Coleman Is a participant in the county's Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program. "I'm proud of 
being clean," she said. 

Methadone program gives recovering addicts another chance 



ByMATTPERA 

mpera@nwnewsgrou p.com 

WAUKEGAN - Beverly Coleman 
sat in the lobby of the Lake County 
Health Department Substance Abuse 
Program office, quietly writing in 
her journal. 

The lobby, v/hich had been full ear-, 
litr in the morning, was now empty 
except for her. A recovering addict 
who currently participates in the 
health department's Methadone 
Maintenance Treatment Program, 
Coleman said she often stayed at the 
clinic after her treatment for the day. 

"Sometimes I just come and I just 
sit here, just to soak up the peaceful- 
ness," she said, "And I just think back 
to where I was when I first walked in 
these doors and where I am now, and 
it's just such a blessing." 

Coleman, a Waukegan resident, 
has been clean for more than a year 
now. She attends group counseling 
sessions at the health department, 
and also receives a daily dose of 
methadone - a prescription medica- 
tion that counteracts a client's addic- 
tion to opiates, often heroine. 
, The assistance she has received 
from nurses, counselors and other 
clients through the substance abuse 
program have combined to keep 
Coleman drug free, she said. 

"The staff here goes way beyond 
their duties," Coleman explained. 
"They really care about the clients 
here. If you want to get clean, this is 
the place." 

Susan McKnight, coordinator for 
the substance abuse program, said 
success is measured in several ways 
when assessing the approximately 80 
clients currently in the methadone 
program. Oftentimes, she added, 



Program demographics 



Below is a list of statistics provided by the Lake County Health Department Methadone 
Maintenance Treatment Program. The numbers convey information about the 147 clients 
who were served by the program from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 of 2006. 

•61 percent were black, 31 percent were white, 7 percent were Hispanic, and less than 1 
percent .were Pacific Islander. 

•62 percent were male. 

•20 percent were younger than 34 years old, 28 percent were between the ages of 35 and 
44 and 51 percent were older than 45. 

•58 percent were dependent on someone else for housing. Less than 1 percent were 
homeless. 

•73 percent were unemployed. 

■ 

•Heroin was the primary drug of 92 percent of the clients. For 7 percent, other opiates 
were the primary drug and less than 1 percent listed prescription opiates as their primary 
drug of abuse. 

•77 percent claimed daily use of heroin/opiates the month prior to coming into treatment, 
while 10 percent claimed no use in the month prior to treatment. 

■»Less than 2 percent completed treatment, while 9 percent were discharged because of 
disciplinary reasons and 17 percent left against medical advice. 



recovering opiate addicts will take 
methadone for years. 

"Our idea of success is not how 
long they're going to stay on the 
methadone,". McKnight said. "You 
take a look at [a client's] criminal pat- 
tern ... are they still.using other types 
of drugs ... do they have a job, are 
they going back to school? There are 
a lot of different factors that we look 
at and the thing is, with addiction, 
it's like any other disease. [Clients 
don't say] 'OK, I entered treatment 
and I immediately start getting bet- 
ter,'" 



Denise Staples, of Waukegan, said 
she has been a client with the 
methadone program in Waukegan for 
close to 30 years. The health depart- 
ment began the the program in 1975. 

"It's helped me stay clean and it 
allowed me to get a job and keep a 
job," she said. 

She explained that she was wor- 
ried that if she stop taking 
methadone, she would suffer the 
same painful detox as opiate with- 
drawal. 

See METHADONE, page 13A 




Julissa Gillig 
Wadsworth teen 
who has been 
missing since 
April 14. 



Agencies 
work to find 
missing teen 

■ 

By EMILY PREVITI 

eprcviti@nwncvvsgfoup.com 

WADSWORTH - More 
than 2,000 children go miss- 
ing each day, according to 
estimates from the U.S. 
Department of Justice. 

More than a week ago, a 
local gii'l became one of them. 

Jill Gillig said she last saw 
her 16-year-old daughter, 
Julissa at 10 a.m. on April 14. 

The Wadsworth teen spoke 
to her parents that afternoon. 
She told them via cell phone 
about her plans to go with 
friends to a concert that night 
at the Mercury Cafe, 1505 W. 
Chicago Ave., Jill said. 
Julissa's 
father Carl 
went there 
at 8 p.m. 
that night, 
b u t 
Julissa's 
never 
showed up. 

At 3 a.m., 
on April 15, 
Julissa had 
not 
returned 
home and 
her cell 

phone was off. Jill called the 
police. 

Multiple agencies work 
to find Julissa 

"About two days into this, I 
started having a meltdown," 
Jill said as her voice broke, 
"But we really just really 
want to focus on getting our 
daughter back." 

Lake County Sheriffs 
Detective Wendell Russell is 
handling the investigation, 
Russell said he has worked 
juvenile, homicide and sex 
crimes cases for the past two 
decades. . 

"The longer that she's 
gone, the more chance [there] 
is that there is something else 
wrong with this situation," 
Russell said April 18. 

According to the National 
Center for Missing and 
Exploited Children, the first 
three hours that a child goes 
missing are the most critical 
for investigators: more than 
76.2 percent of those who are 
murdered are dead within 
three hours of the abduction. 

Larry Owens, a retired 
state trooper from Kentucky, 
is managing the Gillig case 
for NCMEC. The nonprofit 
agency is collaborating with 
Russell on the case. 

Owens said investigators 
heavily weigh several factors 
as they decide whether to 
notify media outlets about a 
missing child, including 
whether that would risk the 
child's safety or intimidate 
the child from coming home. 

See MISSING TEEN, page 12A 





John S. 
Matijevich 



» SeeingltThrough 

Many people find paying taxes to be 
burdensome, but John Matijevich thinks 
that high interest rates fall into ttfat 
realm. He also warns taxpayers to look- 
out for these interest rates from banks 
because borrowers might be the ones ' 
who will have to clean up the mess 
when the bank does not get its money. 

PAGE17A 



» Snapshot 

This week's question 

"What are some things you do to help 
the environment?" 

ANSWERS ON PAGE 17A 



» PartyLines 

Volunteers receive praise 

U.S. Rep. Melissa Bean participates in 
National Volunteer Week events in Lake, 
Cook and McHenry Counties. The 
Barringtpn Democrat also took time to 
praise some Lake County residents for 
their service. 

PAGE 17A 



» OurView 

No easy answers 

After the tragedy at Virginia Tech, it's 
time for unity, not a blame game. 

PAGE 17A 



» SketchView 




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Joshua Wright, 22, removes the ties from a newly planted tree with 
the help of Juvenal Diaz, 18, at the Greenbelt Cultural Center In North 
Chicago. Wright and Diaz, along with other members of the Youth 
Conservation Corps, planted several trees for Earth Day. 



Uxe County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



jmiy. 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page 11A 



Advocate prepares to 
make pitch to the public 



By HELEN MANSFIELD 

hmansfield@nwncwsgroup.com 

ROUND LAKE - Following 
Jim Betustak's sound defeat 
last week in the Lindenhurst 
Village Board President's 
race, Advocate Health Care's 
odds for building a hospital in 
Round Lake might have 
improved, in Ted Mueller's 
opinion. 

Mueller, Hainesville's 
Village Board president, said 
Betustak was one of the great- 
est proponents of Vista 
Health Systems building a 
hospital in Lindenhurst; now, 
with a regime change in 
Lindenhurst, Round Lake 
might look better. 

According to a press 
release from Advocate, the 
hospital requested its own 
public hearing through the 
Illinois Health Facilities 
Planning Board to invite resi- 
dents of northwest Lake 
County to learn more about 
its proposed Advocate - Lake 
County Hospital and the eco- 
nomic development it will 
bring to the community 

These meetings should 
begin sometime in June -or 
July, and Mueller said he. 
would be happy to volunteer 
the HainesvLUe Village Hall 
facilities for such public 
forums. 

Round Lake Village Board 
President Bill Gcntes has said 
the northwest portion of Lake 
County is in dire need of a 
hospital. Other villages such 
as Hainesville, Round Lake 
Beach, Round Lake Park, Fox 
Lake and Wauconda have 
given their support to 
Advocate's plan in Round 
Lake. 

Advocate concedes that 
while a high concentration of 
licensed hospital beds exists 



About Advocate 

Oak Brook-based Advocate 
Health Care, the largest health 
care provider in Illinois, is a faith- 
based, nonprofit system, Advocate 
Is related to both the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church in America and 
the United Church of Christ. 
Advocate's multiple sites of care 
in metropolitan Chicago include 
eight acute care hospitals and 
two children's hospitals, a home 
health care company and several 
of Chicago's largest medical 
groups, 

With 25,000 employees, 
Advocate is the second largest 
private employer in Chicago. 
Through a long-term academic 
and teaching affiliation with the 
University of Illinois at Chicago 
Health Sciences Center, Advocate 
trains more resident physicians 
than any non-university teaching 
hospital in Illinois. For more infor- 
mation about Advocate Health 
Care, visit 
www.advocatehealth.com. 

in the southern and eastern 
regions of Lake County, many 
residents in the northwest 
portion do not have easy 
access to an acute care hospi- 
tal and must drive about 45 
minutes to reach an emer- 
gency room. 

The press release adds that 
"while trying to meet an 
urgent need to build a hospital 
in northwest Lake County, 
Advocate Health Care is invit- 
ing another constituency to 
the planning table - the resi- 
dents who will be using the 
facility." 

"From the beginning, this 
project has been about what 
the community has asked for- 
access to exceptional health 



care," said Jim Skogsbergh, 
president and CEO of 
Advocate. "Northwest Lake 
County has a population that 
understands the importance 
of this issue. Residents want 
to be sure that they can quick- 
ly get to a hospital, and that 
the hospital Is a quality one." 

Advocate's plan is for a 
300,000-square-foot hospital 
that will offer a full range of 
specialty services, including 
an advanced cardiac program; 
a level II trauma center; and 
leading edge intensive care, 
obstetric and surgical care 
units. The 144-bed facility will 
be located on a 57-acre site at 
the corner of Route 120 and 
Wilson Road in Round Lake. 

With approval from the 
IHFPB, the full-service hospi- 
tal would represent an invest- 
ment of more than $250 mil- 
lion in Lake County by 
Advocate, and bring an esti- 
mated 1,000 jobs to the area. 

The hospital was designed 
as an environmentally sensi- 
tive "green" building, and 
Advocate will seek 
Leadership in Energy and 
Environmental Design 

(LEED) certification for it 
from the U.S. Green Building 
Council. 

"With some of the best 
known hospitals in the area, 
like Advocate Good Shepherd 
Hospital and Advocate 
Lutheran General Hospital, 
Advocate Health Care under- 
stands that quality is more 
than an outcome," said 
Skogsbergh in Advocate's 
press release. "It also is an 
experience, and Advocate will 
settle for nothing less than 
attracting the best nurses, 
doctors and associates to help 
this new hospital provide 
exceptional compassionate 
care." 



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Churches take a religious walk 

Organization looks to raise $10,000 at clergy fundraiser 



By TARA CLIFTON 

tclifton;jrnwnewsgroup.com 

LlBERTYVILLB - On a day Hint church 
groups gather for a I'uiulniisor, event organiz- 
ers won't Know how ninny will attend or how 
much money was pledged. 

The system has worked well in the past, 
Linda Perz said, a representative of luterialth 
Chaplaincy Services, luterfalth Chaplaincy 
Services is an organization that offers aid and 
support to church leaders. 

The group will host its 22nd annual Walk for 
Winchester Mouse Chaplaincy Services from 2 
to '1 p.m. on Saturday, May 6, at Winchester 
House, 1125 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

Winchester House is a nursing home for the 
frail and elderly, offering spiritual care and 
religious support. 



The event's co-chair, Sandra L. Dernardoni, 
could not he reached for comment. 

Churches are encouraged to form teams and 
secure pledges for the walk, Per/ said, and this 
process is left entirely up to them. 

Usually, 15 to 20 churches participate, Perz 
said, and the event typically raises $7,000 that 
goes to help the chaplaincy program at the 
house. 

"It never fails that we can count on someone 
who shows up," Perz said. 

Organizers hope to raise $10,000 this year, 
Perz said. 

For youth who walk, Interfaith Chaplaincy 
Services will split their pledges 50/50 Tor that 
congregation's youth programs. 

Anyone is invited to participate, not just 
churches, Perz said. For more information, call 
(847) 336-2777. 



Lake County Audubon Society 
hosts Volo Bog presentation 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

The Lake County Audubon 
Society will present a pro- 
gram ahout the Volo Bog next 
month presented by Stacey 
Iwanicki, a natural resource 
coordinator with the Illinois 
Department of Natural 
Resources. 

The meeting will take place 
on Monday, May 7, at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Libertyville Village 
Hall, 118 W. Cook St. 

Volo Bog State Natural 
Area is an Illinois wetland 
located In northwest Lake 
County. It is the only remain- 
ing "quaking" bog in Illinois 
and barkens back to the 
Wisconsin Glacial period 
more than 6,000 years ago. 

Its formation throughout 
those thousands of years pro- 
duced a particular chemical 
makeup in the soil that result- 
ed in unusual and unique 



To learn more ... 

For information call Chris 
Geiselhart (847) 362-5134. 

plant life that still can be seen 
in abundance during hikes 
across the boardwalk there. 

Several orchids can be 
found in Volo Bog, which is a 
registered National Natural 
Landmark and a dedicated 
nature preserve. 

Picnicking, hiking, and 
cross-country skiing are 
offered at the site. Volo Bog 
was designated an Illinois 
Nature Preserve in 1970 and a 
National Natural Landmark 
in 1973. Interpretive programs 
are available to most ages 
(beginning at 4 years old) 
throughout the year. 

Iwanicki works at Volo Bog 
Stale Natural Area and 
Moraine Hills State Park. 



She has a bachelor's degree 
in zoology from Michigan 
State University and began 
working as the environmental 
educator at Volo Bog in 1987. 

In addition to leading tours 
of Volo Bog, Iwanicki 
recruits, coordinates, and 
trains a group of about 50 vol- 
unteers. 

Witli their help, Volo Bog 
State Natural Area is able to 
provide guided tours of this 
Illinois wetland to the public 
on most weekends and to 
school children during the 
week. During 

Beyond the Bog Tours, 
Iwanicki and the volunteers 
also offer 17 different educa- 
tional programs to school and 
youth groups, plus a variety of 
other programs and events for 
families .and adults through- 
out the year. 

All are invited to attend 
this free meeting. 



»CLCNotes 

Free employer workshops 
Lake County employers are 
invited to a free morning of 
employer workshops on May 17. 
The free workshops are spon- 
sored by the Job Center of Lake 
County and will take place from 8 



a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the James 
Lumber Center for the Performing 
Arts at the College of Lake 
County, 19351 W. Washington 
Street in Grayslake. 
Learn the latest time manage- 
ment tips from speaker, consult- 



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Mydi #4 of 12; All hospices are the same. 

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philosophies of care and support services. 
Monarch Hospice was established by hospice 
nurses and professionals with an objective of 
improving patient aire and enabling patients 
and their families to live life to its fullest at a 
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For more Information or to volunteer, please call 24 houn a day 7 days a wcele 

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ant and author Andy Kaufman, ' 
president of the Institute for 
Leadership Excellence & 
Development Inc. "Beyond Time 
Management: Getting More Done 
with Less Stress." 

From 9:45 to 11 a.m., David 
Miller, head of the Labor and 
Employment practice for the 
Chicago law firm of Dykema 
Gossett, will present new devel- 
opments in employment law. 

An OHSA update will be pre- 
sented from 11:15 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m. 

Attendance is limited for this 
event and reservations are 
required. To RSVP, send an e-mail 
with the name of the company, 
persons attending, phone and fax 
numbers by May 14 to 
Kathleen.McCain@illinois.gov. Or 
register by phone at (847) 543- 
7475 or by sending a fax to (847) 
543-7466, attention: Kathy 
McCain. 





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Page 12A * April 27 r 2007 ALL 



COUNTY 



Uke County- Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



Infant immunization 
week in ftill swing 



lake county journals Where to go 



In celebration of National 
Infant immunization Week, 
and Vaccination Week of the 
'Americas, April 21 to the 28, 
clients of" the Lake County 
Health Department/ 

Community Health Center 
Immunization Program have 
been able to play games, win 
prizes and enter a raffle 
drawing for a gift certificate. 

The games and raffle 
were being offered to encour- 
age families to immunize 
their children. 

The Health Department's 
walk-in clinic for children, 
at 2303 Dodge Ave. in 
Waukegan, Is open from 1 to 
3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Friday; from 

1 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday; and 
from 9 to 11 a.m. on the sec- 
ond Saturday of each month. 

Appointments are not 
necessary. Children of all 
ages, from birth through 
adolescence, are invited to 
celebrate. 

"Babies need to visit a 
doctor or clinic for vaccina- 
tions five times by the age of 

2 for protection against seri- 



The Health Department provides 
Immunization clinics at locations 
throughout Lake County, including 
Waukegan, Lake Forest, Lake 
Zurich, Libcrtyville, Round Lake 
Park, Round Lake Beach and 
Anttoch. 

For times and locations of these 
clinics, contact the Health 
Department al: (847) 377-8470 or 
visit: 

www.co.lakc.il.us/health/chsAii 
seasc/immun.asp. 

ous childhood diseases," 
said Dale Galassie, the 
health department's execu- 
tive director. "Immuniza- 
tions are very important 
because they not only pro- 
vide individual protection, 
but protect the health of the 
enl ire community." 

Each day in the United 
States 11,000 babies are born 
who will need to be immu- 
nized against 13 diseases 
before age 2. 

National Infant 

Immunization Week (NIIW) 
is an annual observance to 



promote the benefits of 
Immunizations and to focus 
on the importance of immu- 
nizing infants against vac- 
cine-preventable diseases. 

Vaccination Week in the 
Americas strives to reach 
the goals of increasing and 
strengthening routine 

immunization coverage and 
advancing awareness of new 
and effective vaccines that 
can help save lives and pre- 
vent disease. 

The Health Department's 
Immunization Program has 
been active for more than 30 
years. 

It provides children with 
all the vaccinations required 
by the state. 

Each child is thoroughly 
screened by a nurse and his 
or her parent is advised 
about what vaccinations are 
needed. 

Parents must bring the 
immunization records of 
their children with them and 
are encouraged to always 
keep current and complete 
records. Childhood vaccina- 
tions are $10 each. But no 
child is denied if his or her 
family cannot.afford the fee. 



Musical revue to aid homeless 

Performance to take place To learn more ... 



•it Winlpo-nn l-Tirrli Qpl-innl For more information, please contact Waukegan 

at vvauKcgan nign ^cnooi Township at (847) 244 . 4900< 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

Lake County Clerk Willard Helander and 
Waukegan Township Supervisor Patricia 
Jones announced that tickets for the "Magic of 
Music: A Musical Revue to Aid the Homeless" 
are on sale and available online and at various 
locations across Lake County. Proceeds from 
the musical benefit Waukegan Township's 
Staben House, which provides transitional 
housing for homeless women with children 
and Staben Center, which provides transition- 
al housing for homeless men. 

The musical revue is scheduled for May 19, 
at the Waukegan High School Auditorium, 
2325 Brookside Ave., Waukegan, with a cur- 



tain call at 7 p.m. Patrons can come see talent- 
ed volunteers from across Lake County per- 
form a veritable medley of music from differ- 
ent genres, 

Tickets are $20 and are on sale at the 
Waukegan Township Supervisor's Office, 
Lake County Clerk's Office, Regional School 
Superintendent's Office, North Chicago City 
Hall or by visiting 

www.waukcgantownship.com/musicalhtm. 

Ticket purchasers may designate their 
tickets to be donated to residents of Lilac 
Ledge, Park Place Senior Center and members 
of the Boys and Girls Club of Lake County 
should they be unable to attend the event. 



Bluebirds benefit from organizations 

Forest preserve looking for bird monitors 



Wadsworth parents say they just 
want daughter to come home 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

Lake County Audubon 
Society donated 20 bluebird 
nest box kits to the Lake 
County Forest Preserve 
District. Boy Scout Troop 188, 
of Lake Villa, assembled the 
kits into nest boxes, which 
will be used by the forest pre- 
serve volunteers who moni- 
tor the many bluebird trails 
throughout Lake County. The 
bluebirds have been an 
endangered species in Lake 
County since the 1920s. 

Because bluebirds are cav- 
ity nesters, one way to bring 



them back is to provide moni- 
tored nesting sites. These 
sites need lo be monitored 
because of two aggressive 
imported species, the house 
sparrow and the European 
starling, which are also cavi- 
ty nesters. Starlings can be 
excluded from the nest boxes 
by making sure the entrance 
hole is the proper size, but a 
house sparrow that is close in 
size to the bluebird will chase 
away or kill the timid blue- 
birds and destroy their eggs. 
It's best not to put a nesting 
box up at all if it's not moni- 
tored to clean out the house 



sparrows. Because bluebirds 
prefer to nest in open areas 
with scattered trees and low 
ground cover, the forest pre- 
serve sites, including golf 
courses, provide many areas 
like this. 

Lake County bluebird trails 
are always in need of volun- 
teers to monitor them. The 
data collected from the moni- 
toring provide a better idea of 
how many bluebirds are 
returning to Lake County. 

For a list of trails that are 
in need of monitors, log onto 
the Lake County Audubon 
Society Web site www.lake- 
countyaudubon.org and 
apply online. 



• MISSING TEEN 

Continued from 10A 

"In most cases, the media 
can help," he said. 

Theories leave question marks 

Russell said he thinks that 
at least one of Julissa's 
friends knows where she 
might have gone Saturday 
afternoon after disembarking 
from the train downtown. He 
said sparse and conflicting 
information have complicat- 
ed his efforts, which include 
driving as Tar as Macomb to 
interview friends of Julissa, a 
junior at Warren Township 
High School. 

"We're hoping she's being 
hidden somewhere with 
friends because otherwise 
she's just gone," Jill said. 

Russell said he is certain 
that Julissa was riding the 
elevated train in Chicago 
with her friends when she got 
off at an undetermined loca- 
tion. 

On April 17, Julissa's 
father Carl recruited relatives 
to help him canvass the city's 
el stops with flyers bearing 



Have you seen her? 

Name: Julissa Gillig 
Age: 16 

Height: 5-foot-3 
Weight: 105 pounds 
Race: white 
Hair: blond 
Eyes: blue 

Wearing: brown corduroy pants 
with a green and blue plaid shirt 
over a cream and raspberry 
striped camisole 
Carrying: a pale yellow cloth 
hobo bag (oversized, shoulder- 
slung) 

Contact (847) 549-5200 with 
any information 

Julissa's picture. He also went 
to Des Plaines, where the fam- 
ily lived until three years ago. 

"We really just want to get 
the message out that her fam- 
ily loves her ... and that every- 
thing is fine and we just want 
her to come home," Jill said. 

Generally, teens "go miss- 
ing" for reasons that range in 
gravity, from physical and 
sexual abuse to rebellion 
against parents' rules, Russell 
explained. 



Wendell said records do 
not show police activity at the 
Gillig's Wadsworth home. 
There also are no signs of 
abuse, he added. 

"Usually, It's disagreement 
between parents and chil- 
dren," Russell said. 

In this case, Julissa did 
argue with her parents, JiU 
said, about her plans for the 
evening. 

Julissa left with a friend 
during the morning of April 
14. When she later decided to 
skip her shift at Toys-R-Us for 
the concert, her parents 
objected. 

But Jill said she still 
"expected [Julissa] to come 
home," adding that honesty 
and mutual respect character- 
ize their relationship. 

"She doesn't scream and 
yell at us - she just deals with 
it," JU1 said. "The whole thing 
just doesn't make sense." 

The Belmont Area Special 
Victims Unit of the Chicago 
Police Department also is 
assisting with the case. 

Russell has asked that any- 
one with information contact 
him at (847) 549-5200. 




79 th Annual 



Lake County Fair 



July 24th -29th 



A Wheelin' Squealin' Good Time!! 




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Rt 45 & Rt 120 - Grayslake 




847-223-2204 



WWW.LGFAIR.NET 

Check our MONTHLY Schedule of Events on the web! ! 






I 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



£MK 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page 13A 



University Center adds staff 



lake county journals For more information 



The University Center or 
Lake County has added two 
new staff members to assist 
individual students as well as 
area employers and commu- 
nity organizations to make 
fullest use of the University 
Center's resources. ttoth 
began work earlier this 
month. 

Tonia Baxter is the new 
recruitment specialist/advi- 
sor. 

She came to the University 
Center from Metropolitan 
State University in St. Paul, 
Minn., where she had served 
for almost seven years as air 
academic advisor. Prior to 
that, she was an academic 
advisor at University of 
Minnesota. 

Baxter lives in Halnesville 
and will split her time 
between the University 
Center facilities in Grayslake 
and Waukegan. 

She is available to advise 
potential students about their 
University Center options 
and to make presentations at 
local jobsites and community 
organizations about the 
University Center. 

Myra Gaytan-Morales has 
succeeded L. Sherea 



To learn more about programs 
offered through the University 
Center of Lake County, visit its 
website www.ucenter.org or call 
(847) 665-4000. 

Washington as the director uf 
the University Center at 
Waukegan. 

She came from the College 
of Lake County where she 
had served since 2001 as advi- 
sor for the ENLACE 
(ENgaging LAtino 

Communities for Education) 
program. 

Gaytan-Morales is a resi- 
dent of Waukegan and has 
served on the Center's 
Waukegan Advisory Board, 
She is also the current presi- 
dent of Hie Coalicion Latinos 
Unidos de Lake County. 

As director or the 
University Center at 
Waukegan, she will help to 
develop educational program- 
ming for the center's 
Waukegan site based on the 
needs or northeastern Lake 
County. She also will work 
countywidc to assess how the 
center can meet local work- 
force development needs. 

"We're so pleased that we 



About the University 
Center 

The following are University 
Center's member institutions: 
Benedictine University, The 
Chicago School of Professional 
Psychology, Concordia University 
Chicago, DoPaul University, 
Dominican University, Governors 
State University, Illinois State 
University, Kendall College, 
National-Louis University, North • 
Park University, Northeastern 
Illinois University, Northern Illinois 
University, Roosevelt University, 
Saint Xavier University, Southern 
Illinois University Carbondale, 
University of Illinois at Chicago, 
University of Illinois at Springfield, 
and University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign. 

could create the recruitment 
specialist/advisor position 
and that we could add two 
such strong performers to the 
University Center team, " 
said Hilary Ward Sclmadt, 
Associate Dean for Academic 
Services and Programs. 
"We're eager to expand our 
programming in Waukegan 
and to add more student serv- 
ices. Tonia and Myra will 
help us do both." 



Students gear up for cicadas 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

It only happens once every 17 years but, 
when this year's cicadas make an appearance, 
the students at Our Lady of Humility Catholic 
School in Beach Park will be ready 

Thanks to a visit from the Lake County 
Forest Preserve's CicadaMobile, everyone at 
the school is knowledgeable about this feat of 
nature. 

The CicadaMobile is a roving museum that 
includes interactive exhibits and informa- 
tional panels. 

Students learn all about periodical cicadas 
and the emergence of the insects that is 
scheduled for this Spring/Summer. 

The students worked in groups, completing 



worksheets and activities relating to the life 
cycle of the cicadas, where they occur around 
the world and their calls - the loudest in the 
insect world. 

The students also learned about the cica- 
da's predators and about the implications of 
their upcoming appearance. 

One of the most popular options allowed 
students to dress up as cicadas, complete with 
wings and sunglasses. 

"This was a great program for our stu- 
dents," Our Lady of Humility Principal 
Beth Lindstrom said."It was hands-on learn- 
ing geared to helping children understand the 
amazing events which are due to occur this 
Summer. I think we're all excited to see our 
first live cicada." 



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Beverly Coleman waits to see the doctor at the Lake County Health Department's substance abuse pro- 
gram headquarters for her daily dose of Methadone. Coleman said she owed her recovery to the staff 
of the substance abuse program. 

Clients receive many types of treatment 



• METHADONE 

Continued from 10A 

Staples added that the 
program has helped her 
through group sessions with 
other recovering addicts. 

"I think hearing other 
people's problems, some- 
times you realize yours 
aren't as bad as you think," 
she said. "I get feedback from 
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program are required to 
attend the group sessions, 
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with a counselor and the pro- 
gram physician. 

Each morning, they 
arrive at the clinic to receive 
their dose of methadone, 
which comes in a dissolvable 
tablet dropped into juice. 

Most are required to take 
the dose at the nurses' sta- 
tion. Others, who have 



stayed off ol' opiates lor an 
extended period of time, arc 
able to take their dose home 
with them in a lock-box. 

Relapses do happen, 
McKnighl said, explaining 
that opiates are among the 
most difficult drugs to kick 
for good. But, she added, 
things learned in treatment 
make it difficult to get com- 
pletely lost in that addiction 
again. 

"[Clients are] sitting in 
groups, you're hearing other 
people, you're seeing people 
who have been where you're 
at," she said. "So even ir they 
go back to using, it's not the 
same as before you were ever 
in that type of recovery envi- 
ronment." 

Coleman, who walks to 
the program for treatment 
every day, said she owed her 
recovery to the caring staff 
of the substance abuse pro- 



gram. 

The treatment she has 
received has helped her gain 
enough stability that she 
will soon be reunited with 
her 8-year-old son, Isaiah, 
who has been living with 
Coleman's parents in Texas. 
He is set to arrive in 
Waukegan on May 24 to live 
with his mom. 

As she sat in the lobby of 
the Substance Abuse 
Program center, putting her 
thoughts on paper and 
reflecting on how far she has 
come, Coleman said the pro- 
gram had helped bring her 
back from a dark place. 

"I don't have everything 
financially, and I still strug- 
gle financially, but I'm so 
happy and peaceful within to 
know that I have my soul 
back," she said. "And that 
means more to me than any- 
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Page 14A • April 27, 2007 ALL 



.OBJIUARIES. 



lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumaIs.com 




WILLIAM M. PETERSEN 

Died: April 17, 2007 
loved to travel especially to Las 
Vegas and on cruises 

KENOSHA, WIS. - William M. 
Petersen, age 71 of Kenosha, Wis., 
and formerly of Third Lake, died 
Tuesday, April 17, 2007 at 
Harmony Living Center in 
Kenosha, Wis. 
Bill was born 
in Evanston, 
to the late 
frank and 
Helen 

Petersen and 
served his country in the Marines. 

Survivors include his children 
Paula (William) Borchardt and 
Todd Petersen; his grandchildren; 
his siblings; his former wife, 
Victoria Petersen; and special 
friend, Anne Minkler. Bill's parents 
precede him in death. 

The funeral was held at 10 
a.m., on April 21 at Strang Funeral 
Chapel & Crematorium, in 
Grayslake. Inurement followed at 
Highland Memorial Park in 
Liberlyville. Friends of the family 
visited from 4 to 8 p.m. on April 
20 at the funeral chapel. The fami- 
ly wishes to extend heartfelt 
appreciation for the special care 
given to Bill at St. Joseph Home 
for the Aged, Harmony Living 
Center, and Dr. Trimark's office. 
Please sign the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 

CAMILLE BARTON- 
McDOUGALL 

Infant 

Died: April 17, 2007 

Camilla Barton McDougall, 
infant daughter of Dawn Barton 
and lain McDougall, passed away 
Tuesday, April 17, 2007 at the 
Evanston Hospital. She was pre- 
ceded in death by her twin broth- 
ers, Logan and Lucas. 

Surviving is her sister, Desirce; 
and her parents, Dawn Barton and 
lain McDougall. 

A graveside service was held 
at 2 p.m., April 20 at Willow Lawn 
Memorial Park in Vernon Hills. 
Arrangements were handled by 



the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in 
Llbertyville. Please sign the Guest 
Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/oblts 

JAMES EDWIN BROWN 

Bom: Sept. 28, 1943 
Died: Aprilll, 2007 
Received a civil engineering 

degree from the Chicago 

Technical College 

LIBERTYVILLE - James Edwin 
Brown, age 63, of Llbertyville, died 
Wednesday, April 11, 2007 at the 
Condell Medical Center. He was a 
member of the United Methodist 
Church in Llbertyville. 

Surviving are his wife, Judith 
Norel Brown; four children, Sandra 
Brown of Irvine, Calif., Wendy 
Brown (Ted Hazelgrove) of 
Grayslake, Jason (Cathy) Brown 
and Sean Brown, both of 
Liberlyville; six grandchildren; his 
brother and a sister-in-law. He 
was preceded in death by his par- 
ents, Hubert and Carrie Brown and 
by a brother. 

Visitation was from 10 a.m. 
until the time of services at 11 
a.m., April 21 at the United 
Methodist Church in Liberlyville. 
Memorial contributions can be 
made to Condell Hospice, 115 W. 
Church St., Liberlyville, IL 60048. 
Arrangements were handled by 
the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in 
Libertyville. Please sign the Guest 
Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 

DOROTHY M. 
WENNERSTEN 

Born: June 2, 1921 

Died: April 17, 2007 

Was a member of St. Paul 

Lutheran Church in Round Lake 

Park 

ROUND LAKE PARK - Dorothy 
M. Wennersten, age 85, of Round 
Lake Park, died Tuesday, April 17, 
2007 at her home. She was born 
in Birchwood, Wis., to John and 
Essie Lackey. 

Survivors include her children, 
Loren (Barbara) Wennersten of 
Niles, Darrell (Mickey) Wennersten 
of Lake Villa, Nancy (John) Sloan 



Milwaukee, Wl 53201. Please sign 
the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 



of Orange Park, Fla„ and Kathy 
(Scott) Murphy of Woodland, 
Calif.; her seven grandchildren; her 

eight great-grandchildren; her one 

great-great-grandson; her brother; JEAN MARIE 

and her very good friends Ray and GRISCHEAU HINK 

Leda Nofsinger. Her husband of 



59 years, Loren and aforemen- 
tioned parents precede her in 
death. 

A memorial service was held at 
2 p.m., on April 21 at Strang 
Funeral Chapel & Crematorium in 
Grayslake. Interment was private- 
ly held. Friends of the family visit- 
ed from 1 p.m., until the time of 
service. 

In lieu of flowers, memorial 
contributions may be made to 
Save-A-Pet, 31664 N Fairfield Rd, 
Grayslake, IL 60030. Please sign 
the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 

PATRICK L 
MONAHAN JR. 

Bom: Jan. 7, 1979 

Died; April 17, 2007 

He played football with Warren 

Township Youth Football and 

Libertyville High School 

GURNEE - Patrick L. Monahan, 
Jr., age 28 of Gurnee, died 
Tuesday, April 17, 2007. He was 
born In Waukegan to Patrick 
Monahan, Sr. and Charlotte 
Boesch. 

Survivors include his parents 
Patrick Monahan, Sr. and Charlotte 
(Robert) Boesch; his grandpar- 
ents, Michael and Elizabeth 
Richards; his siblings, Jennifer 
(Brian) Berg, Chris Boesch, Becky 
Boesch, Scott Boesch, and Bobby 
Boesch; his nephews; and his 
many aunts, uncles, and cousins. 
His grandparents, Howard and 
Laura Monahan precede him in 
death. 

A memorial service was held at 
1 p.m., on April 22 at Strang 
Funeral Chapel & Crematorium, in 
Grayslake. Friends of the family 
visited from noon until the time of 
service. Interment was privately 
held. In lieu of flowers, memorial 
contributions may be made to 
Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, 
Mail Station 3050, P.O. Box 1997, 



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Died: April 19, 2007 
She and her husband owned TV 
Hink & Son in Fox Lake 

FOX LAKE - Jean Maria 
Grischeau Hink, age 76 of Fox 
Lake, died Thursday, April 19, 2007 
in Buffalo Grove. She was preced- 
ed in death by her loving husband 
of 36 years, Leonard J. "Lenny" 
Hink Jr. in 1987. She was also pre- 
ceded in death by her beloved 
sons, Mark and Leonard Hink and 
by two brothers. Jean was a 1949 
graduate of Grant High School. 
Jean and Lenny Hink owned TV 
Hink & Son, a television sales and 
service business in Fox Lake. 

Surviving are her children, Lea 
Ann (JP) Godinez of Elgin, Susan 
(Patrick) Schneider of Hawthorn 
Woods and Patricia Hermes of Fox 
Lake; grandchildren, two great- 
grandchildren, and her sister. 

An interment ceremony was 
held at 11 a.m. on April 23 at the 
Ascension Cemetery in 
Libertyville. In lieu of flowers, 
donations to the American 
Diabetes Association (www.dia- 
betes.org) would be appreciated. 
Arrangements were handled by 
the Burnett-Dane Funeral Home in 
Llbertyville. Please sign the Guest 
Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obtts 

JAMES F. TROEMEL 

Bom: Sept. 26, 1934 
Died: April 21, 2007 
Worked at Waukegan Safe & Lock 

GRAYSLAKE - James F. 
Troemel, a 72-year-old Grayslake 
resident, passed away, April 21, 
2007 at Condell Medical Center in 
Libertyville. He was born in 
Chicago to Ciarence and Catherine 
{nee McFall} Troemel. James was 
an operating engineer for over 
three decades, and then worked 
at Waukegan Safe & Lock for 20 
years. 

Loving father of Jim (Cathy) 
Troemel of Ingleside, Ken (Jan) 
Troemel of Lake Bluff, Greg (Julie) 
Troemel of Normal, and Brian 



(Linda) Troemel of Lake Villa; 
beloved grandfather of 11; brother 
of 3. His wife, Patricia Troemel, 
and aforementioned parents pre- 
cede him in death. 

Friends of the family visited on 
April 24, from 4 to 9 p.m. at 
Strang Funeral Chapel & 
Crematorium in Grayslake. 

The funeral service was held at 
10:30 a.m., meeting at the Faith 
Baptist Church, In Grayslake. 
Interment followed at St. Joseph 
Cemetery, In Round Lake. 
Memorial donations may be made 
to the family for presentation to 
the Tilden Tech Scholarship Fund. 
Please sign the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 

ELLEN E. 'BETTY' 
SCHAD 

Bom: April 3, 1919 

Died: April 21, 2007 

Was a member of the Happy 

Seniors of the Round Lake Park 

District 

ROUND LAKE BEACH - Ellen E. 
"Betty" Schad, age 88, of Round 
Lake Beach, died Saturday, April 
21, 2007, at Condell Medical 
Center In Llbertyville. She was 
born April 3, 1919 In Round Lake to 
Peler and Alice (Renehan) Myer. 
Betty was a lifetime resident of 
the Round Lake area. She attended 
St. Joseph Catholic Church in 
Round Lake; and later attended 
Catvary Presbyterian Church in 
Round Lake. 

She was a member of the 
Happy Seniors of the Round Lake 
Park District. A doting grandmoth- 
er and great grandmother, she 
also enjoyed baking, quilting, and 
sewing, 

Survivors include four children. 
Barb (the late Ralph) Welch, Alice 
(Greg) Troken, .Roger (Barbara) 
Schad, and Tonl Schad, all of 
Round Lake Beach; 10 grandchil- 
dren, Marge (Ted) Evert, Debbie 
(Dave) Willmore, Ralph (Chris) 
Welch, Sheri (Ron) Lanier, Kim 
(Mark) Graff, Julie (Jeff) Jones, 
Jody (Marc) Perez, Michael 
(Angie) Welch, Aaron Troken, and 
Brandon Hawks; nine great-grand- 
children, Keith, Zach, Anna, 
Remington, Laura, Nathan, 
Madison, Noah, and Eli; and a sis- 
ter, Bertha Beckmann of Kenosha, 




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Wis, She was preceded in death 
by her husband, LeRoy Schad, on 
Jan. 8, 1977; three daughters, 
Patricia, In childhood, Carol 
Willmore and Bette Evert; three 
sisters and a brother. 

Friends visited with the family 
from 10 a.m. until the 11 a.m. 
memorial service, on Friday, April 
27, at Calvary Presbyterian 
Church, 510 N. Cedar Lake Road, In 
Round Lake. The Rev. Lisle 
Kauffman officiated. Memorial 
tributes to Betty would be appre- 
ciated to the American Cancer 
Society, by Sponsoring Team GL13 
in the Relay for Life event; 100 
TriState International 125, 
Lincolnshire, IL 60069. 
Arrangements were entrusted to 
Justen's Round Lake Funeral 
Home, 222 N. Rosedale Court, in 
Round Lake. Friends may send a 
condolence to the family at 
www.justenfh.com, or call (847) 
546-3300 for further information. 
Please sign the Guest Book at 
wwwIakeCountyJournals.com/obits 

BRIAN ANTHONY PSAK 

Bom: Sept. 29, 1986 
Died: April 20, 2007 
Was a member of the 2003 State 

Champion Carmel High School 

team 

ROUND LAKE HEIGHTS - Brian 
Anthony Psak, a 20-year-old 
Round Lake Heights resident, 
passed away at his home on 
Friday, April 20, 2007. Born in 
Lake Forest, Brian was a member 
of the 2003 State Champion 
Carmel High School Football Team. 

Beloved son of Anthony M. 
Psak and Elaine H. Zavodny Psak, 
both of Illinois; loving grandson of 
Stella Ntezgoda Zavodny of Illinois. 
His grandparents Steven Zavodny, 
Sr., John J. and Violet Hadeed Psak 
precede him in death. 

Friends of the family visited on 
April 24, from 4 to 8 p.m. at 
Strang Funeral Chapel & 
Crematorium in Grayslake. The 
funeral service, officiated by 
Reverend Lisle Kaufman of the 
Calvary Presbyterian Church in 
Round Lake, began at 10:30 a.m. 
on April 25, and also at Strang 
Funeral Chapel. 

Interment followed at 
Highland Memorial Park in 
Libertyville. Memorial donations 
to Teen Challenge of Western 
Michigan, 440 E. Pontaluna Road, 
Muskegon, Mi 49444 would be 
appreciated. Please sign the Guest 
Book at 
www.LakeCountyJoumals.com/obits 

BETTY SUTCLIFFE 

Bom: Jan. 23, 1927 

Died: April 20, 2007 

Special interests were traveling, 

See OBITUARIES, page 15A 





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COUNTY 



ALL April 27, 2007* Page 15A 



• OBITUARIES 

Continued from 14A 

collecting Nativity sets and knit- 
ting Christmas stockings 

ANTIOCH - Betty Sutcliffe, age 
80 of Antioch, passed away on 
Friday, April 20, 2007 at Thorek 
Memorial Hospital in Chicago. She 
was born in Chicago the daughter 
of the late William and Lydla 
(Mueller) Vanselow. She was one 
of the vice presidents and 
cashiers at the State Bank of the 
Lakes. 

Survivors include her four chil- 
dren, Kathleen Wurster of Chicago, 
Carleen Wurster of Antioch, David 
Wurster of Rolling Meadows, and 
Dorcen (Richard) Mitchell or Oak 
Park; her three stepchildren 
Barbara (Dick) Wolf of Antioch, 
Linda (Harry) Batts of Wood Dale, 
and Patricia (Dan) Wise of Genoa 
City, Wis.; her sister; her seven 
grandchildren, 15 great grandchil- 
dren, and two grand dogs. In addi- 
tion to her parents she was also 
preceded in death by her husband, 
John Sutcllff; her ex-husband Carl 
Wurster; and her stepson, Jack 
Sutcliffe. 

The funeral was held at 11 a.m. 
on April 25, at the Antioch United 
Methodist Church in Antioch. 
Graveside services followed at 
2:30 p.m. in Memory Gardens 
Cemetery, in Arlington Heights. 
Visitation was held on April 24 
from 4 to 9 p.m., at the Strang 
Funeral Home of Antioch, and at 
the church on April 25, from 10 
a.m., until the time of the service. 
In lieu of flowers, donations may 
be made to the church for the 
stain glass window restoration. 
Please sign Betty's guestbook at 
www.strangfh.com. Please also 
sign the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournaIs.com/obits 

SUSAN M. PRANKE 

Born: Nov. 7, 1957 



Died: April 14, 2007 
A memorial service will be held at 
a later date 

ANTIOCH - Susan M. Kreutzer 
Pranke, age 49, of Antioch, 
passed away on Saturday, April 14, 
2007, as a result of an auto acci- 
dent In Newton, Iowa. She was 
born In Libertyvllle, the daughter 
of Marian and the late, Claus 
Kreutzer. 

She is survived by her hus- 
band, Drew; her children, Bob and 
Leah; her mother, Marian; her sis- 
ters and brothers; and many other 
relatives and friends. 

Funeral Mass began at 10 
a.m. on Friday, April 27, at Prince 
of Peace Catholic Church, 135 S. 
Milwaukee Ave. (Route 83), Lake 
Villa, (847) 356-7915). Interment 
was at Ascension Cemetery in 
Libertyville. There was no visita- 
tion, Family and friends were 
asked to assemble at the church 
at 9:45 a.m. on Friday, April 27. In 
lieu of flowers, memorials would 
be appreciated to: Memorial Fund 
for Robert and Leah Pranke, c/o 
Lake Villa Community Bank, 345 S. 
Milwaukee Ave., Lake Villa, IL 
60046 or the Memorial to benefit 
Drew Pranke, c/o Consumer's 
Cooperative Credit Union, 2626 N. 
Route 83, Round Lake Beach, IL 
60073. There will be a memorial 
service and gathering at a later 
date determined by Drew Pranke's 
(Lake County Sheriff Deputy) 
recovery progress. Funeral 
arrangements were handled by 
Ringa Funeral Home, in Lake Villa. 
Please also sign the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 

WALLY HERMAN 

Born: Nov. 6, 1948 

Died: April 21, 2007 

Was the dedicated owner of 

Wildwood Service and Herman 

Brothers in Gages Lake 

GAGES LAKE -Wally Herman, 



age 58 of Gages Lake, passed 
away suddenly on Saturday, April 
21, 2007. Wally was born in 
Waukegan on Nov. 6, 1948 to 
Eloise and Orvan Herman and 
Walter Rosenow. "I know Wally" 
was the common phrase when 
family and friends would 
encounter a "stranger" as it 
seems that just about everyone 
knew him, 

Survivors include his sons, 
Michael (Jennifer) Herman and 
Chad (Cari) Herman; his grandchil- 
dren; his brother; his nephew; 
many aunts, uncles, and cousins; 
and far too many friends to list, 

The funeral was held at 10:30 
a.m., Friday, April 27 at Strang 
Funeral Chapel & Crematorium, 
410 E Belvidere Road, in 
Grayslake. Interment followed at 
Warren Cemetery in Gurnee. 
Friends of the family visited from 3 
to 8 p.m., on April 26 at Strang 
Funeral Chapel & Crematorium in 
Grayslake. 

In lieu of flowers, Wally would 
be proud to know you made a 
donation to St. Jude Children's 
Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude 
Place, Memphis, TN 38105 or the 
Grayslake Rescue Squad, 160 
Hawley St, Grayslake, IL 60030. 
Please sign the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJoumais.com/obits 

LEO P. HANSEN 

Bom: May 7, 1938 
Died: April 19, 2007 

DES PLAINES - Leo P. Hansen, 
age 68 of Des Plaines, died 
Thursday, April 19, 2007 at 
Glenview Terrace Nursing Center. 
He was born in Chicago to Leo 
and Carolyn Hansen. 

Survivors include his children, 
Eric Hansen of Hollywood, Fla,, 
and Mary Hansen of Skokie; his 
grandchildren; and his sister. His 
father Leo and son, James precede 
him in death. 

The funeral was held at 1 p.m., 



on April 26 at Strang Funeral 
Chapel & Crematorium, in 
Grayslake. Interment followed at 
Ivanhoe Cemetery in Ivanhoe. 
Friends of the family visited from 
4 to 8 p.m., on April 25 at the 
funeral chapel. In lieu of flowers, 
memorial donations may be made 
to the Alzheimer's Disease 
Foundation. 4709 Golf Road, Ste 
1015, Skokie, IL 60076. Please sign 
the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 

YVONNE MAE TORREZ 

Bom: Feb. 7, 1941 
Died: April 22, 2007 
Her dearly loved sister, Jean 
Drozek preceded her in death 

MtLLBURN - Yvonne Mae 
Torrez, age 66 of Millburn, died 
Sunday, April 22, 2007 at the 
University of Illinois-Chicago 
Hospital. She was born in Chicago 
to the late George and Flora 
Smith. 

Survivors Include her husband 
of 49 years, Frank; her children, 
Francine (Hung Chi) Tran, Doreen 
(Edward) Ruder, F. Richard Torrez, 
Christine Kerkman, Joseph Torrez, 
Michael Torrez, Sabrina (Michael) 
Lindsay; her grandchildren; and 
her three great-grandchildren. Her 
aforementioned parents and the 
sister she so dearly loved, Jean 
Drozek precedes her in death. 

A Mass of the Resurrection will 
be held at 10 a.m., Saturday, April 
28 at St. Gilbert Catholic Church, 
301 E Belvidere Rd. in Grayslake. 
Burial will follow at Highland 
Memorial Park at Libertyville. 
Friends of the family may visit 
from 4 to 8 p.m., Friday, April 27 
and from 9 to 10 a.m., Saturday, 
April 28 at Strang Funeral Chapel 
& Crematorium, 410 E Belvidere 
Rd. in Grayslake. Memorial dona- 
tions may be made to PKD 
Foundation, 9221 Ward Parkway, 
Ste 400, Kansas City, MO 64114 or 
at www.pkdcure.org Please sign 



the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 



ANTHONY D. 
BELLACERO 

Bom: Jan, 22, 1926 
Died: April 24, 2007 
Served his country in the U.S. 
Navy during WWII 

LAKE VILLA - Anthony D. 
Bellacero age 81, a longtime resi- 
dent of Lake Villa, died Tuesday, 
April 24, 2007 at the Condell 
Medical Center in Libertyville. He 
was born on Jan. 22, 1926 in 
Altoona, Pa., to Pasquale and Rose 
(nee Tomeo) Bellacero, and was 
united in marriage to Bridget 
Murphy on June 26, 1948 in 
Canada. He enlisted in the U.S. 
Navy in 1943 and served his coun- 
try during WWII and after for 20 
years before 
his retirement 
in 1963. He 
was a member 
of the fleet 
reserve, and 
was a kind and 

loving husband, father, grandfa- 
ther and great grandfather. 

He will be greatly missed by: 
three children: Betty (Ron) 
Anderson, Pat (Marilyn) Bellacero 
and Cathy (Richie) Brodie; one sis- 
ter, Catherine Roscia; 10 grand- 
children and 19 great-grandchil- 
dren, and several nieces and 
nephews. He was preceded in 
death by his wife. 

Visitation was held on April 
25, from 5 to 9 p.m. at the K,K. 
Hamsher Funeral Home 12 N. 
Pistakee Lake Road, in Fox Lake, 
(The Chapel On The Lake), where 
funeral services were conducted 
at 10 a.m. on April 26.. Burial fol- 
lowed at Ascension Cemetery in 
Libertyville, Memorials may be 
made to the family C/O P.O. Box 
292, Fox Lake, II. 60020. Please 
sign the Guest Book at 
www.LakeCountyJournals.com/obits 




»CRIMESTOPPERS 

Inglesidc 

Lake County Crime Stoppers 
and the Lake County Sheriffs 
Office / CID are seeking Infor- 
mation regarding a theft. 

On Jan. 24, the Lake County 
Sheriff's Office received a 
report of a stolen 2004 
Yamaha 4-Wheeler, Model 
WFZ450, white and candy 
apple red, Serial No. 
JY4AJ11Y64C021O62, that 
was stolen from 35002 N. 
Lake Matthews Trail, in 
Ingleside. The complainant 
reported that the Yamaha 4- 
Wheeler was stolen some- 
time during the midnight 
hours between Jan. 23 and 
Jan. 24. The value of the 4- 
Wheeler is approximately 
$4,500. We are looking for 
anyone with information 
regarding this incident or any 
other similar incident within 
Ingleside or the surrounding 
area. 

Lake County Crime Stoppers 
and the Lake County Sheriffs 
Office/CID would like to 
remind everyone to call when 
suspicious activity or a suspi- 
cious person is observed, and 
do not try to confront suspi- 
cious subjects yourself. 

If you have any information 
about these crimes or any 
other felony crimes or felony 
fugitives, contact Crime 
Stoppers at (847) 662-2222. 
Also, abuse of the elderly is a 
crime, so lets not forget to 
report this type of crime as 
well. 

If your information leads to 
an arrest you could be eligi- 
ble for a cash reward of up to 
$1,000. 

Crime Stoppers wants your 
information - NOT Your Name. 



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COUNTY 



Lake County Journals/ LakeCountyJoumals,com 



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: ! 







A Lake County Journal and Market Journal special advertising section 




■" .. : . :> 



Daughters & Sons To Work Day!! 

April 26th, 2007 

Businesses host Take Our Daughters And Sons To Work Day' 



LAKE COUNTY JOURNALS 

Take Our Daughters And 
Sons To Work Is a national 
public education program 
that connects what children 
learn at school with the actu- 
al working world. 

This year, the event took 
place on April 26. 

By accompanying their 



parents and guardians to the 
workplace, girls and boys 
across the country discover 
the power and possibilities 
associated with a balanced 
work and family life. 

Launched by the Ms. 
Foundation for Women in 
April 2003, Take Our 
Daughters And Sons To Work 
broadened the discussion 



about the competing chal- 
lenges of work and family. 
Designated for the fourth 
Thursday of April each year, 
the program's accompanying 
curriculum takes what boys 
and girls learn in the work- 
place on Thursday and apply 
it to their classroom studies 
on Friday 

By involving whole com- 



munities - schools, girls and 
boys, parents, workplaces, 
and mentors - the program 
helps young people make con- 
nections between what they 
learn in school and their 
future goals. 

A child who knows her 
father is an engineer might 
not know what his work 
entails. When a child states 



his mother is a pharmacist, 
does he understand the intri- 
cacies of her work? These 
are the topics Take Our 
Daughters And Sons To Work 
aims to address. The inten- 
tion is to enlighten children 
on the work their parents and 
guardians to every day and 
motivate them to begin to 
imagine 



Interactive workplace 
activities encourage girls and 
boys to think now about how 
their dreams - botli for their 
work and family lives - can be 
achieved. 

For more information on 
how you can celebrate work, 
family and education in your 
community, visit www.daugh- 
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Opinion 



» FirstAmendment 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting 
free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or of the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government 



JLAKECOUN1Y 
OURNALS 



NEWS CRCP 

or ORE AT C R CHIC AS Q 

John Rung - Group Publisher Larry Lough - General Manager 
Chris Krug - Group Editor Matt Pcra - News Editor 



Edition of April 27-May 3, 2007 ALL • Page 17A 
>> OurView 

No answers 
for acts of evil 



LakeCountyJournals.com 



Liviu Librescu survived the 
Holocaust to become a respected 
aeronautics engineer who taught at 
Virginia Tech. 

Last week, Librescu was one of 
32 people killed by 23-year-old Cho 
Seung-Hui. Students said Librescu, 
76, blocked the doorway to his 
classroom as they opened windows 
to escape. 

Librescu's story is one of 
dozens being told in the aftermath 
of the worst mass shooting in mod- 
ern US. history. The numbers that 
had been reported slowly were 
replaced with human faces and • 
tragic tales in the days after the 
shootings. 

What happened occurred on 
such a massive scale that the 
nation needs to mourn and come to 
terms with this overwhelming 
event. 

This is a time for unity. 
Unfortunately, some already have 
trotted out tired political rhetoric. 

This isn't a time for gun control 
advocates, or culture warriors, or 
gun rights supporters. Public poli- 
cy debates should not be driven by 
emotion in the immediate after- 
math of such a horrific event. .. 



It's also not a time to preach 
about America's cultural decline. 
We already have heard more than 
enough empty statements from 
talking heads about how American 
society has become much more vio- 
lent, despite the fact that the FBI's 
violent crime rates hit historic 
lows in the U.S. during the 1930s 
and remained flat until 2005. 

This is a time to remember and 
honor the dead, to praise people 
•such as Librescu and to tell their 
stories. And it is a time to try to 
determine what happened. The 
truth is, we likely never will know 
the whole why. 

Cho was as a troubled loner who 
left a rambling note. But you won't 
find any ultimate answers in Clio's 
writings. 

A seven-page note cannot 
explain why someone indiscrimi- 
nately kills 32 people. It is impossi- 
ble to explain the unexplainable. 

Rationally, it makes sense to 
search for such answers; a massive 
tragedy should mean something. It 
must be the culture. Or a lack of 
gun control. Or something. 

But, maybe it's just that Cho 
was insane. Or, even worse - evil. 



» PartyLines 



Bean honors youths' efforts 
for National Volunteer Week 



U.S. Rep. Melissa Bean recently 
participated in National Volunteer 
Week events in Lake, Cook and 
McHenry Counties to recognize 
volunteers in her district. The 
Barrington Democrat also honored 
some of her young constituents for 
their outstanding service. 

Addressing the Lake County 
After School Coalition Youth 
Empowerment Summit recently, 
Bean helped the organization's ini- 
tiative that encourages seventh- 
and eighth-grade students 
throughout Lake County to recog- 
nize the significant role they can 
play in making their communities 
a better place to live. 

The students participated in a 
series of activities during the day- 
long summit that focused on devel- 
oping leadership and organization- 
al skills to motivate other teens in 
advancing healthy choices. 

Bean singled out some of her 
own young constituents who have 
donated their time, creativity and 
energy. They included Brittany 
Metz, 17, of Mundelein, a distin- 
guished finalist and recipient of 
the bronze medallion from 
Prudential Awards. Metz started a 
leadership program at her school 
to replace student council and 
include community service and 
student outreach. 

Jason Redford, 10, of Gurnee, 
also was honored. He started 
Operation Talk to a Troop to 
encourage school kids to write 
hundreds of letters of appreciation 
to our troops overseas. 

Remembering 'Rock* 

Tributes continue for the late 
Rodney "Jim" Swift Rockenbach, 
who had been Grayslake Fire Chief 
and Avon Township trustee. 

"I remember going to the Fire 
Service Institute and he was an 
instructor," said Barry Henby, bat- 
talion fire chief in Gurnee. "He 



was teaching a class on ladder 
operations. He was quite a guy. He 
was one of the pioneers in the fire 
service." 

Rockenbach died March 30 at 
age 79. He joined the Grayslake 
Fire Department in 1979. 

Helander to be recognized 

Before Lake County Clerk 
Wlllard Helander officiated yet 
another busy election night on 
April 17, she was honored for her 
work' in public health. 

In conjunction with National 
Public Health Week, April 2 to 8, 
the Lake County Health 
Department/Community Health 
Center and the Board of Health 
honored Helander for her contribu- 
tions to county emergency pre- 
paredness efforts. 

During recent months the 
health department has worked 
with the clerk's office to develop a 
plan to use local polling places for 
distribution should the need for 
mass prophylaxis arise during a 
public health emergency. 

The Centers for Disease Control 
recommends the development of 
mass medication plans for provid- 
ing medication to an entire popula- 
tion within 48 to 72 hours. 

Previously, the health depart- 
ment had drafted a plan that would 
have used five local schools as dis- 
pensing sites. 

A drill conducted in 2006 
showed that plan could not meet 
the need to medicate the popula- 
tion of Lake County within the 
CDC recommended time frame. 

By using polling sites, the popu- 
lation will be spread out to a larger 
number of locations, alleviating 
possible traffic congestion and 
reducing the need to travel far 
from home. 

Helander will be formally recog- 
nized at the Lake County Board 
meeting on May 8. ; 



>>SnapShot 



"What are some things that you do 
. to help the environment?" 





u We buy those 
[energy-saving] light 
' bulbs. And I do river 
clean ups." 

Maggie Bodame 
Gurnee 

"Recycle, turn the 
heat down [and] use 
those efficient light 
bulbs." 

Lee-Ann 

Wauconda 




"I get rid of the oil 
from my car and 
take it to a distribu- 
tion center" 

John Moody 

Lindenhurst 

"We dispose of old 
cell phones so they 
don't harm the envi- 
ronment." 

Brian Pokrzywa 

Wauconda 



» SketchView 




The cmcpao spire 



TrtEBlMiO&VicH Sfflte 



» YourView 

Support Vista plan 
To the Editor: 

There's something for 
everyone in Lake County, 
from picturesque rural 
communities to highly 
developed urban centers 
and tourist attractions. 
During the last five years, 
the county's population 
has increased by 9 per- 
cent. By 2020, projections 
put the population of Lake 
County (currently 702,682) 
at more than 800,000 res- 
idents. 

Our community needs 
access to more health care 
services to support this 
projected growth. Vista 
Health System's plans to 

enhance its existing 

services in Waukegan and 
build a new medical center 
in Lindenhurst would meet 
our county's growing and 
changing health care 
needs, create more jobs 
and stimulate economic 
growth to match our pop- 
ulation's growth. 
Lake County needs the 
kind of care I received 
when I recently had minor 
surgery at Vista Medical 
Center East. The doctors 
and nurses were attentive 
and knowledgeable, and I 
felt very comfortable dur- 
ing my stay. I fully support 
Vista's plans to meet . 
these needs in our boom- 
ing Lake County communi- 
ties. I am supporting a 
new hospital in 



Lindenhurst, and expan- 
sions to the existing facili- 
ties in the Waukegan com- 
munity. 
I hope you'll join me in 
supporting Vista's plans to 
ensure that all Lake 
County residents have 
access to health care serv- 
ices. 

Suzi Schmidt 

Chair Lake County Board 

Reform school funding 
To the Editor; 

On April 17, voters in 
many communities across 
the state were asked to 
pay an even greater share 
of the school funding bill, 
often without success. 

In Lake'County, four out 
of five referendums failed. 

It is difficult to blame 
homeowners, who feel 
they pay more than their 
fair share for education. 
Because they're right. 
Compared to other states, 
Illinois ranks 47th in its 
percentage share of school 
funding, leaving local 
property owners with 
most of the bill. 

This year there is a win- 
dow of opportunity for our 
governor and the General 
Assembly to change the 
way schools are funded in 
Illinois, and end the 
decades-long cycle of sky- 
rocketing property taxes 
and underperforming 
schools. It's going to take 



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some courage on the part 
of businesses and taxpay- 
ers to risk finding a better, 
fairer way. 

Voters must contact, , 
their state representatives 
and senators and urge 
them to support a 
statewide reform package 
that improves both the 
funding and quality (but 
also the accountability) of 
Illinois schools. 

Working together, we 
can seize this moment and 
make the perennial refer- 
endum debate a thing of 
the past. - 

Chuck Crowley 

Gurnee 

Dear Grayslake Residents 
To the Editor: 

I wish to express my 
deepest gratitude for giv- 
ing me another opportuni- 
ty to serve our community 



on the Village Board. I 
especially want to thank 
my network of volunteers 
and supporters who 
worked so hard to make 
this election possible. 

I enjoyed meeting and 
talking to many of my fel- 
low neighbors and resi- 
dents. I appreciate all the 
positive feedback and gen- 
uine concern I received 
from many residents who 
want Grayslake to contin- 
ue to be a great place to 
live and raise a family. I 
hope to establish a rela- 
tionship with even more 
residents in the next four 
years. Please feel free to 
get in touch with me for 
any reason. Enjoy your 
summer and 1 hope to see 
you around town. 

Rhett Taylor 

Grayslake 

trusteetaylor@hotmail.com 



» SeeingltThrough 

Interest rates as burdensome as taxes 



With the state of Hliriois mired in 
deep financial doo-doo, and every- 
one knowing that some sort of tax 
increase is inevitable, I have been 
asked which tax would be the best. 

It's like being asked which is the 
lesser of two evils, the state income 
tax or Gov. Rod Blagojevich's gross 
receipts tax. Under the premise, 
both are evil, and taxpayers will not 
support any increase. 

In either case, tax burdens shift 
downward to the consumer. If the 
state income tax were properly 
enforced against corporate income 
by closing the loopholes, and there 
was a comparable shift toward prop- 
erty tax relief, that would be fairest 
to the average taxpayer. 

There is no such thing as a great 
or best tax, only one that is the - 
fairest to fit the particular circum- 
stance. 

Something should be said here, I 
think, about what is the most unfair 
tax overall, even though it is not a 
tax at all. That overly burdensome 
tax is high interest rates. It isn't a 
tax because none of it goes toward 
funding any level of government. 

High interest rates might as well 
be called a tax. They make it diffi- 
cult to drive down a principal when 
so much of your paymertt goes 
toward paying the cost of interest. 

As the saying goes, "Beauty is in 
the eyes of the beholder." To those 




John S. 
Matijevich 



who save with certificates of 
deposits and other investments, they 
enjoy the benefit that high interest 
rates accrue to them. But, to the 
many who are negatively impacted, 
high interest rates are worst than 
ugly. 

It's no wonder that the housing 
boom has gone bust. When mort- ■ 
gage houses, banks, lending institu- 
tions, and predatory lenders began 
to offer mega-loans to people with 
ho money down, and to buyers with 
little ability to pay, it was a recipe 
for disaster. All around the country, 
we can see the bottomless pit that 
many consumers, by the greed of 
others, have fallen into. 

It has become a vicious cycle. A 
homeowner can't afford a mortgage 
payment and loses out altogether. 
The predatory lender forecloses and 
turns around to find another buyer, 
or shall I say a sucker, who also will 
not be able to pay. the fees and mort- 
gage on an often overvaluated prop- 
erty, What a devious merry-go- 
round. 



When you piece everything 
together, is there anything different 
in this scheme than the savings and 
loan scandal of years gone by? And 
wasn't it the taxpayers who bailed 
out the wrongdoers after that 
humongous scandal? 

I remember the good old days 
when most of us believed that banks 
were there to help families to save. 
They denied loans until they were 
assured that people could afford the 
loans. Somewhere along the line 
things changed. 

When the financial institutions 
learned that they could make a 
faster buck by teaching their cus- 
tomers to spend rather than save, 
everything sort of ballooned after 
that. 

. There are those who hail the 
decade of the housing boom as proof 
of a strong economy. If lending 
institutions continue to make such 
precarious loans, just as in the sav- 
ings and loan scandal, not only will 
ordinary people be wiped out, but 
many financial institutions will suf- 
fer, too. 

Will the taxpayers have to bail 
them out again? Let's not take it 
with a grain of salt as we did the 
last bailout. 

*John S, Matijevich writes a weekly 
column for the Lake County 
Journals. 






5?" I 



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Page 18A • April 27, 2007 WL/FL/AN/LV 



COUNTY 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 







Earth Day 2007 




Sandy Drcssncr • sbiosstie; a nwnewsgrouii.com 

Laura Herrick, of Round Lake, gives her son, Andrew, 1, 
and her new tree a ride in a stroller during the Village 
of Round Lake's Arbor Day celebration. 




Little Miss Wadsworth 2006 Ashleigh May, 2005 Cassidee Guthrie, 2006 Jr. Miss Wadsworth Erin 
a stretch of Dilley's Road in Wadsworth on April 22. 

Warren Township 
High School envi- 
ronmental stud- 
ies students sort 
donated gym 
shoes as part of 
the Reuse-A-Shoc 
program spon- 
sored by the 
school's environ- 
mental studies 
classes. Nike will 
grind the recy- 
cled shoes to use 
as playground 
surfaces and ath- 
letic courts. 



Chris Padgetl - cpadge1tiSnwnewsgroup.com 

Inman and 2006 Ambassador Jennifer Vanko help clean 



Sandy Qressncr • sbrossnenffnwnewsgroup.com 

Free trees were available to the first 50 families registered 
during the Village of Round Lake's Arbor Day celebration. 







■ ■SiS5SS , »»r.- r f- . 

'.■■■■»■•«■■- 




Chris Hironimus drags a 
bucket of sod to his 
truck during the Village 
of Lindenhurst's annual 
Earth Day event. Mulch, 
sod and firewood were 
available to event-goers 
at no charge. 



Sandy Bfessnor • sbrKsncrfS'nwncwsgroup.com 



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ANTIOCH, It fiooo2 



ANATOMY OF A GALLERY: The International 
Museum of Surgical Science introduces two new 
exhibits that open Friday, May 4. 



SHACK OF MUSIC: The Shack in Mundelein 
presents the band Redshirt on Friday, April 27, and 
the band Planet Groove on Saturday, April 28. 



SECTION B 

Edition of April 27-May 3, 2007 
LakeCountyJournals.com 




Details for BestBets events on page 6B 

SELF-DEFENSE: Contours Express in Mundelein 
will host a beginner-level self-defense seminar for 
women 14 and older on Saturday, May 5. 




.: rr^-^zajLsssEaasEzcni 



» ElementsOfTheRidiculous 

Cable confusion 

Columnist Jana Thompson 
shares her adventure about 
trying to get cable and Internet 
installed in her home. 

PAGE 9B 



» SpecialExhibit 

Dinosaurs take over 

Ever wonder about the large 
dinosaurs that used to roam the 
earth? Then experience the new 
dinosaur exhibit at The Field 
Museum through Sept. 3. 

PAGE4B 



» Out&About 

Calendar 

Looking for something to do in 
Lake County or the Chicago 
area? Check out the calendar for 
events and activities. 

PAGE6B 









&?&&* 



'A.- 





» RelishTheArhericanTable 



A new kind of rice 

Quinoa might be small, but it's 
big on taste. Try these healthy, 
tiny grains in place of rice for 
any meal. 

PAGE 8B 



-' ■ 




Sanity Bressner • sbressneriSnwrtew5group.com 

Ten-year-old Amina Mayfleld, of Waukegan, releases her kite in the wind, as her dad, Mike, holds the end of the kite string during the Waukegan Park District's Flying 4 
Kids kite-flyrng event. The program had a sunny, breezy day at Belvidere Park on Saturday, April 21. 

Residents raise kites to help raise awareness 



r i~v.rj.By JESSICA JACOBSJN, , 

jiacobsen@nwnewsgroup.com 



M 



» OnStage 
'Cynical Weathers' 

"Cynical Weathers" tells the 
story of a man struggling to 
balance religion and politics. The 
play is staged through May 13. 

PAGE3B 



other Nature let the 

sun shine bright 

and kites fly high 

, last weekend, which 

brought smiles to many 

faces. 

With temperatures in the 
70s and a strong breeze, kids 
and families made their way 
to the Waukegan Park 
District's Flying 4 Kids 
event, which took place on 
April 21. 

From 1 to 2 p.m., visitors 
were able to fly kites at 
Belvidere Park. They also 
were able to make their own 
kites. 

Amina Mayfleld, 10, was 
among the participants who 
made kites to fly. Mayfleld 
said she learned about the 
program from her dad. 
Because her dad works at the 
park district, Mayfleld has 
attended the event before. 

"It's kind of fun," she said. 

Joanna Ramirez, 6, said 
she came because it was 
windy, and she wanted to fly 
her My Little Pony kite. But 
that wasn't the only reason 





[The Flying 4 Kids event] 

is to basically raise 
awareness of youth 
programs at park 
• districts. 



Lara Wahlbeck 

Waukegan Park District 
recreation specialist 



•»' 



Sandy Bressner ■ sbressner@nwncwsgroup.com 

Isaih Humes, 7, runs and launches a kite he made during the Waukegan Park District's Flying 4 Kids 
kite flying event on Saturday, April 21, at Belvidere Park. 



the Waukegan resident want- 
ed to enjoy the spring day. 

"[I'm going to] play in the 
park," she said. 

Lara Wahlbeck, 

Waukegan Park District 



recreation specialist for 
youth and teen activities, 
said that during the two 
years she has been with the 
park district, the event has 
had a nice turnout. 



"Last year, I think we had 
about 15 or 20 people out 
here," she said. 

This year, there were not 
as many people early on, but 
many more turned out later 



to enjoy the statewide event, 
including Pat Tomkins, 50, of 
Waukegan. 

As Tomkins flew a kite 
that Saturday afternoon, he 
said he came out with his 
family because "it's cheap 
and it's fun." 

Wahlbeck said the pro- 
gram is part of the Illinois 
Park and . Recreation 
Association, so other park 
districts participated in the 
event that day as well. 

"It's to basically raise 
awareness of youth pro- 
grams at park districts," she 
explained. 





» Views 

Columnist Kevin Kaduk says that 

former Chicago baseball star Sammy 

Sosa has a selective memory when 

it comes to fan perception, as Sosa 

said he has never been booed by 

fans before. 

PAGE12B 




» PrepSports 

Grant on top 

Grant High School looks' to improve 
its fourth-place team finish at state 
last year, and seems to be on its way 
with a win at a nine-team invitational. 

PAGE18B 



» QuickHttters 

Athletic spotlight 

Grant's Kariann Hill hits a grand 
slam at just the right time, while 
Antioch's Bjbrn Jaranson drives in 
five runs to rub the salt in. 

> , PAGE10B 



» GameOfTheWeek 

Grayslake Grapple 

Baseball fans are in for a treat, as 
Grayslake Central takes on 
crosstown rival Grayslake North. 

PAGE10B 



» DiningOut 




Sandy Bressner .sbressner@nwnewsgfOup.cofn 

Two-year-old Reese Hendrickson checks out some of the sugary offer- 
ings at Sweet Susie's In downtown Grayslake. See the story on page 7B. 



i 



ttStBfi 



M^BttEBBMKMMM 



: ■ . , 



* 



* 



Page 2B • April 27, 2007 ALL 



1AKEUEL 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 







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Find a 'suiting' look 




Bathing suits fit 
every body type 



By GENEVA WHITE 

gwhlte@nwnewsgroup.com 

"When did my thighs start 

jieeiine?" 

"I didn't have this gut a 
year ago." 

"My butt! I can't look at 
my butt!" 

"Oh forget it! I'll just wear 
a tarp to the beach this sum- 
mer." 

When swimsuit season 
approaches, this often is an 
unfortunate scene in women's 
dressing rooms. But it doesn't 
have to be. The latest bathing 
suit styles offer something for 
every shape. 

Color, color and more color 

Fashion experts say bright 
colors and fun patterns will 
be big in swim wear this sum- 
mer. So ditch the itsy-bitsy 
part of the bikini and keep 
the yellow polka dots. Watch 
for plenty of yellow, orange, 
coral, fuchsia, lime green and 
turquoise, said Laura 
McDowell, fashion spokes- 
woman forTJ Maxx. Funky 
geometric patterns, florals 
and animal prints also are 
popular, McDowell said, as 
well as nautical colors, such 
as navy blue, red and white. 

Metallics also are in, with 
suits boasting silver and gold. 

"Gold looks good on almost 
every skin tone," said Anne 
Hankey, assistant academic 
director for fashion market- 
ing and management at the 
Illinois Institute of Art in 
Schaumburg. "Silver is a lit- 
tle harder to pull off." 

White is another big color 
this year, Hankey said. But 
like silver, it Is difficult to 
wear unless you're thin and 
tan. 

Then there's the tradition- 
al black suit, which never 
goes out of style. 

Tanklnis to tunics 

The tankini, a two-piece 



Suit dos and don'ts 

• DON'T try boy shorts unless 
you have a thin frame. 

• DO wear tops that have as 
much support as a bra if you 
have an ample bustline. 

• DON'T wear swimsuit bottoms 
that allow your rear end to peek 
out. 

• DO try a tankini. They can give 
you the comfort of better 
coverage and the fun of a bikini. 

• DON'T wear a white swimsuit if 
your skin Is pale. 

• DO pair fun flip-flops and 
wedges with your suit. 

swimsuit offering better cov- 
erage than the traditional 
bikini, remains in style. 
Before tankinis, women who 
feared showing their midriffs 
were limited to one-piece 
suits. 

"A tankini gives a woman 
the same coverage as a one- 
piece, but allows them to have 
a better fit," said Donna West, 
a buyer for Londo Mondo, a 
Chicago swimwear and active 
wear boutique. "They're also 
fun." 

When it comes to swimsuit 
cover-ups, often worn for 
activities outside the water, 
forget the boring old sarong. 
Enter dresses, tunics and 
even sleeveless hoodies. 

The bottom line 

Choosing the right swim- 
suit bottom can mean the dif- 
ference between shrieking in 
horror at your reflection and 
being confident that you look 
great. 

Hankey said a swimsuit 
bottom should fit well and not 
show any portion of the per- 
son's rear end. For shorter, 
curvier women, a suit with 
higher leg openings works 
well, she said. 

"Finding a bottom that 
accentuates you is the best 
thing," Hankey said. 

And the skirted bottom 
now Is available on suits for 
women of all ages. 

"It's kind of flirty," West . 
said. "Yet it can give a woman 




extra coverage to make her 
feel comfortable." 

And as Important as a bot- 
tom that fits is a top that does 
the same. Women with ample 
bustlines need to wear 
bathing suit tops that offer 
support. 

"If you have a large chest, 
you should not be wearing 
teeny, tiny bikini tops that 
don't have an underwire," 
Hankey said. "You should be 
wearing a bathing suit top 
that's just like a bra 1 and 
offers support." 

Having the latest style of ■ 
swimsuit will do you little 
good if it doesn't fit properly, 
experts say. 

"It's not just something 
that's cute and trendy," 
Hankey said. "It should be 
something that looks good on 
your body and accentuates 
your positives." 

Think outside the flip flop 

For beach and pool 
footwear, flip flops are still in, 
but these days come with 
more style, McDowell said. 

"They're not just rubber," 
she said. "They're leather. 
They can have sequins on 
them, or rhinestones. They're 
more than just a beach shoe." 



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Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



LAKELIFE 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page3B 






i' 



Iconic play comes to Chicago 



"Stella!" might be one of the most famous 
cries to echo in theaters for decades. 

And now, the play that revolutionized 
American Theatre, Tennessee Williams' "A 
Streetcar Named Desire," is getting new life 
through April 29 at the Metropolis Performing 
Arts Centre, 111 W. Campell St., in Arlington 
Heights. 

The play allows viewers to become lost in the 
torrid life of Blanche DuBois, a former school 
teacher and socialite, as she's forced to move in 
with her pregnant sister Stella and Stella's 
brutish husband, Stanley But the fragile ex- 
teacher quickly learns gritty life lessons in the 
seamy, steamy underbelly of 1940s New Orleans. 

Perhaps one of the most famous American 
plays ever written, "A Streetcar Named Desire" 
debuted in 1948. Today, the play is considered an 



Want to go'i 



What: "A Streetcar Named Desire" 

When: 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays; 8 p.m. on Fridays; 7 

p.m, on Saturdays; and 3 p.m. on Sundays, through 

April 29 

Where: Metropolis Performing Arts Centre, 111 W. 

Campell St., in Arlington Heights, 

Tickets: Cost $29 to $38 

For more information: Call the Metropolis Box Office 

at (847) 577-2121, or visit www.MetropolisArts.com. 

icon of its era. In 1951, a film of the play was 
made and starred Marlon Brando. The film won 
several awards, including a Best Actress 
Academy Award for Vivien Leigh, who played 
Blanche. 



Colorful clothes take center stage 



'Designs for Hope 
fashion show takes 
place in Lake Villa 

By TARA CLIFTON 

tclifton@nwnewsgfoup.com 

Lamarr Pottinger seemed 
to enjoy himself at Kids Hope 
United's fashion show. 

As one of the first models 
to walk the runway, the 
Antioch Community High 
School student performed a 
backflip, earning whoops and 
applause from the audience. 

Kids Hope United hosted its 
fourth annual Designs for 
Hope Blue Ribbon Fashion 
Show last weekend at 
Lehmann Mansion. The show 
was part of an all-afternoon 
event that included a silent 
auction and refreshments. 

The event raised funds to 
help raise awareness of child 
abuse and support Kids Hope 
United child abuse prevention 
services. 

Before the fashion show 
started, Jennifer Evans, who 
served as emcee, pointed out 
the pale blue carnations sit- 
ting on each table. 

The 300 flowers, she said, 
represented the number of 
children who would be abused 




Chris Padgett - cpadgctt@nwncwsgroup.com 

Anthony Kimbrell, Elizabeth Tidel, Cassie Menke and Mona Gava wait 
to walk the runway in the Kids Hope United Fourth Annual "Designs 
for Hope" Blue Ribbon Fashion Show. 



in one day. 

"We have the power in our 
hands to affect these num- 
bers," Evans said. 

The amount of funds 
raised was not available at 
press time. 

Pottinger wasn't the only 
model to have fun modeling in 
front or hundreds of people. 

Anthony Kimbrell, who 
sported a black suit and cher- 
ry-red vest for prom, strutted 
down the walkway, smiling 
and stroking his chin as he 
pointed at people in the crowd. 



The models were volun- 
teers, ranging from Kids Hope 
United employees to high 
school students. 

Retailers like Carson Pirie 
Scott, Cloud 9 Bridal, Lucy Q 
Children's Boutique and more 
provided the clothing mod- 
eled. 

Celeste and Liana DiMaria, 
twin girls, wore Lucy Q. flower 
girl dresses. They seemed to 
receive the most "Awww"s 
from the audience because 
they shyly walked the runway 
with small smiles. 



» OnStage 




Photo provided 

(From left) Bethany Alexander, Tom Amandes and Lindsay Gould perform a scene from Douglas Post's 
"Cynical Weathers" at Victory Gardens Theater. 

Politics, religion collide 



By THOMAS WITOM 

thomaswitom@yahoo.com 

"Cynical Weathers," 
Douglas Post's witty new 
play premiering at Victory 
Gardens Theater, takes a 
provocative look at what 
can happen when politics 
and religion meet. 

As Post sees it, the 
encounter is a potent one. 

Here's the setup: Dixon 
McDaniels (compellingly 
played by Tom Amandes), a 
conservative Republican 
congressman from Texas, 
finds himself backpedaling 
on a key environmental 
issue as support for the 
energy bill he proposes falls 
by the wayside. 

A newly hired young 
press aide, Andrea (fervent 
Lindsay Gould), a dedicated 
evangelical convinced that 
"God's plan" for the end of 
the world - the final rapture 
- is at hand, steers the con- 
gressman in a faith-based 
direction. 



Tickets, please 

What; "Cynical Weathers" 
Where: Victory Gardens 
Theater at the Biograph, 2433 
N. Lincoln, in Chicago 
When: Through May 13 
Tickets: $20 to $45 
Show information: (773) 871- 
3000 

This puts him at odds 
with his liberal-minded 
wife, the sharp-longued Cat 
(Bethany Alexander), a self- 
described agnostic and a 
scientist, whose research 
has her convinced that the 
time to act on global warm- 
ing is now. 

"I want to change every- 
thing," she argues. Her hus- 
band's waffling on the issue 
is unacceptable. 

Dixon is unsure exactly 
which path to follow as an 
elected official. He looks to 
the Bible for answers, on 
the one hand, while he pre- 
pares to face "the full fury 



of the oil oligarchy" on the 
other. 

The doomsday scenario 
is reinforced by news of a 
potentially devastating hur- 
ricane making its way 
toward southeastern Texas. 

It forces a quick evacua- 
tion by Dixon, Cat, Andrea 
and two speech writers on 
the congressman's staff - 
Manny (Tony Castillo) and 
Lee (Ben Brooks Cohen), 
who are confounded with 
regard to which message 
their boss wants to convey. 

The cast of "Cynical 
Weathers," directed by 
Dennis Zacek, does a 
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predictability. 

But there's no complaint 
about Samuel Bell's hand- 
some set design, an exqui- 
site wood-paneled living 
room that takes full advan- 
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Page 4B- April 27, 2007 ALL 



LAKELIEL 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



Dinosaurs take over Field Museum 



Experience a journey to the past 



ByKURTDEGALKA 
kbcgalkaiSnwticwsgroup.com 

The Field Museum's newest 
dinosaur exhibit takes visitors 
to the shore of an ancient lake 
bed. This is what China's 
Liaoning Province looked like 
- 130 million years ago. 

Hear the call of the 
Cretaceous, including the buzz 
of insects and the sound of 
rippling water spilling into a 
pool filled with prehistoric 
fish. Winged dinosaurs soar 
above. Others crawl across a 
carpet of decaying bones and 
logs on the forest floor. 

Welcome to "Dinosaurs: 
Ancient Fossils, New 
Discoveries," where a duck- 
sized dinosaur named Mel 
long - Chinese for "soundly 
sleeping dragon" - is curled up 
as though asleep, its head 
tucked under a forelimb. That 
is how today's birds sleep, said 
Peter Makovicky, curator of 
fossil amphibians and reptiles 
at the Field Museum. 

Its discovery in 2004 gives 
credence to the theory that 
meat-eating "theropods" - 
with their short forelimbs and 
powerful hind legs - were 
ancestors or the first birds. 

"Hopefully, it will give us 
knowledge about the world 
around us and help us inter- 
pret it," Makovicky said of the 
exhibit. "People are used to 
looking at this in the theater 
or on the Discovery Channel." 

Hollywood can stretch the 
truth. T. rex, the dinosaur that 
keeps pace with a speeding 
Jeep in the movie "Jurassic 
Park," in fact would have been 
hard-pressed to top 25 mph. A 
scale model of a running T. 
rex, as well as an analysis of 
its bones and joints, show 
speed was not the animal's 
forte. A six-ton Tyrannosaur 
would have required an 
ungainly three tons of leg 
muscles to reach 45 mph. 

"How did they move? What 
did they do with those strange 
structures on their skulls, and 
what did they look like?" 
Makovicky said. "We learn 



Want to go'i 



What: "Dinosaurs: Ancient Fossils, 

New Discoveries" 

When: Through Sept. 3 

Where: The Field Museum, 1400 

S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago. The 

Field Museum is open from 9 

a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Last tickets 

are sold at 4 p.m. 

Admission: $19 for adults, $14 for 

seniors and students (with 

identification), $9 for children 

ages 4 to 11; Includes museum 

admission. To buy tickets, call 

(866) 343-5303, or visit 

www.fieldmuseum.org. For 

groups of 15 or more, call (888) 

343-5385. 

For more information: Call (312) 

922-9410. 

Getting there: Take CTA bus lines 

Nos. 6, 12 or 146. An indoor 

parking garage is near the main 

entrance. 

what dinosaurs were capable 
of as living organisms rather 
than as static mounts." 

The interactive exhibit 
gives visitors a feel for the 
questions scientists grapple 
with, as they sift through his- 
torical fragments. How did 
dinosaurs walk and run? Were 
30-ton plant-eaters able to 
move their long necks in all 
directions? Were horns and 
frills simply calling cards for a 
mate, or did they have other 
purposes? And, most impor- 
tantly, why did dinosaurs van- 
ish? 

Makovicky said the leading 
theories behind the mass 
extinction are climate change 
because of a meteorite or mas- 
sive volcanic explosion and 
the disappearance of heat- 
trapping inland seas when 
continents drifted apart. 

"We want people to have a 
sense of knowing how scien- 
tists know what they know," 
Field Museum project manag- 
er Hillary Hansen said. "It's 
not guesswork. Paleontologists 
are making very exciting dis- 
coveries all of the time." 

Makovicky lias done field 




Dtlong paradoxus, a 130 million-year-old primitive cousin of the Tyrannosaurus rex, was covered with branched protofeathers 
the feathers found on modern-day birds. Learn about this animal and more at The Field Musuem's new dinosaur exhibit. 



Photo provided 

precursors to 



work in Wyoming, India, 
Argentina and China. He 
leaves next week for Laiyang 
in China's Shandong 
Province. Field research, he 
said, is an important aspect of 
his job. 

"it's a very discovery-driv- 
en field of science and new 
discoveries come up all the 
time," he said, "That is one of 
the things that is fascinating." 

For example, Makovicky 
said, evidence found in a tiny, 
15-pound relative of the tricer- 
atops suggests its unwieldy 
skull likely evolved to help 
attract a mate rather than as a 
defense against predators. 

"Dinosaurs: Ancient 

Fossils, New Discoveries" is 
full of unusual exhibits -from 
the only known T. rex foot- 
print, to a 65-million-year-old 
bird-like Bambiraptor, to a 
cast of prehistoric footprints 
left on a mud flat 100 million 
years ago. 



Walk through the exhibit 



• Meet Bambiraptor, a dinosaur as cute as a baby deer - unless you're the small mammal seized by its 
large claw. This recent fossil discovery provides evidence about the link between dinosaurs and birds. 

• The biomechanics of therapods. Find out if you could have outrun a T. rex by studying a remarkably 
accurate, 6-foot long, robotic skeleton. Paleontologists, biomechanical engineers, and computer scientists 
teamed up to create this lifelike moving creature (above). Explore how scientists reconstructed T. rex's gait 
and speed and learn what scientists have recently discovered about dinosaur aging and growth, including the 
most incredible adolescent growth spurt of all time. 

• New technology reinterprets old evidence. One day, about 100 million years ago, a herd of long-necked, 
plant-eating dinosaurs trekked their way across a mud flat. Sometime later, a large meat-eating dinosaur 
crossed the path they'd trod. All this information is contained in the life-size replica of a trackway that offers 
new insight into dinosaur behavior. 

• Horned heads. Rows of impressive dinosaur skulls are displayed along the exhibition's "trophy wall." 

• Prehistoric Liaoning forest. Travel back 130mtllion years to the marshy shore of a lake in this life-size 
recreation of a forest in what is now Liaoning Province in China, one of the most important fossil beds in the 
world. Thirty-five species of dinosaurs, reptiles, birds, mammals, insects and plants are recreated. 

• Mass extinction. What killed off the dinosaurs? Did they all perish one terrible day 65 million years ago 
when a huge object from outer space slammed into Earth? There's little doubt that a major impact occurred, 
but so did other major events, including huge volcanic eruptions, the disappearance of inland seas, and ensu- 
ing climate change. And why did half of the Earth's species survive? 

• The future of the past. How long was a dinosaur's life? How did they grow so large? How did they live? 
These are the kinds of questions paleontologists are tackling today, using new technologies and new discover- 
ies to understand dinosaurs, not as piles of fossilized bone, but as living animals. 



Exercising while on vacation is possible 



Vacations mean rest, relax- 
ation, and rejuvenation from 
the stressors of daily life. 

The American Institute of 
Stress shows that vacations 
are good for us, revealing that 
those individuals who take an 
annual vacation significantly 
defuse job stress and cut their 
risks of diseases by 20 to 30 
percent in the following year. 

However, most Americans 
seeking a relaxing escape from 
reality overindulge in 
unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, 
leaving exercise and healthy 
eating at home. 

"Some individuals have the 
mentality that exercise isn't 
necessary while on vacation, 
but tins isn't true," said Rosie 
Ward, director of health and 
wellness at Northwestern 
Health Sciences University in 
Bloomington, Minn., in a 
release, "Exercise not only 
helps our bodies function bet- 
ter, but provides the sense of 
normalcy and stability our 
bodies need when traveling 
over time zones, eating differ- 
ent types of foods, and adher- 
ing to schedules we are not 
used fo." 

Ward reminds people that 
overindulgence can lead to 
feeling the need to work twice 
as hard upon return. 

"You want to feel 'refreshed' 
when you get back, without 
thinking you need to be a slave 
to your workout in order to 



make up for time lost or 
weight gained," she said. 

Katie Burns Ryan, an asso- 
ciate professor and clinician at 
Northwestern, said exercising 
on vacation doesn't require fol- 
lowing a strict, intensive 
timetable to be effective. 

"Exercise doesn't have to 
adhere to a rigid schedule and 
doesn't have to last for an hour 
or more," she said, in a release. 
"Exercise can include short 
bursts of activity, including 
sightseeing on walking tours, 
swimming, running on the 
beach or trails, using Uie 
hotel's exercise equipment, or 
simply yoga or resistance 
training within your own hotel 
room," 

Ward suggests the following 
tips to work exercise in while 
on vacation: 

• Do your homework and ask 
questions- Call lite hotel or 
look it upon the Web to discov- 
er what activities or amenities 
the location offers so you can ' 
pack appropriately and plan 
ahead. Find out how safe the 
activities are before you sign 
up for them and ask the hotel 
if it has an arrangement with 
a nearby gym or look into any 
health clubs that might be 
near by. 

• Know yourself - Know how 
much exercise you need, per- 
haps based on your regular 




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routine and discover whore it 
could fit into your vacation. 
You might need to shift your 
mentality about how exercise 
looks for you and do different 
types of activities that will 
still rellect the overall goal you 
want to get from exercise. Veiy 
active individuals will choose 
more adventurous activities 
like rock climbing, while oth- 
ers might be satisfied with 
dance or yoga classes offered 
by a cruise or resort. 

• Try something different - You 
don't have to do the same old 
exercise routine day afier day 
while on vacation. Try touristy 
activities like walking tours or 
do a more adventurous activity 
to keep active and engaged. It's 
important to let loose but to 
not completely let yourself go. 

• Pack appropriately- You can 

easily pack items like exercise 
tubes, an exercise mat, or even 
your iPod packed with a week's 
worth of workouts from 
Podfitness or a podcast to keep 
you going while on vacation. 
Resistance training and yoga 



require no space and can be 
done in your hotel room. 

Burns Ryan suggests the 
following to improve one's 
overall health to make exercise 
easy upon arrival at your des- 
tination: 

• Do isometric exercises oh the 
plane or in the car - These exer- 
cises help improve circulation 
and relieve muscle stiffness 
during travel. Isometric exer- 
cises involve tensing muscles 
such as those in the toes, 
calves, quads or ham strings 
and holding them in a station- 
ary position while maintain- 
ing the tension and then 
releasing. 

For additional resources on 
exercising while on vacation, 
visit www.nwhealth.edu/nns, a 
Web site hosted by 
Northwestern Health Sciences 
University. 

• Information courtesy of 
The Natural News Serviceat 
Nortliwestern Health Sciences 
University hi Minnesota. 



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Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



1AKEL1EE 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page 5B 



i 





Mw/yyt fj|: ^/t/e/<fax/tmc/t/ S@c//r</t 



Petrucci's: Fresh Italian fare 



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Petrucci's 

Italian 

Market & 

Cafe 

311 West Depot Street 
Antioch, 1L 60002 

(847) 3954836 

Open: Monday - Saturday; 
8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

Entree Prices: 
Lunch $7.25 - $8.95; 
Dinner $10.95 -$14.95 

Credit Cards: 

MasterCard, Visa 

Reservations: Taken, but not 
required." 

Other: Ample parking, chil- 
dren's menu, carry out, cater- 
ing, Italian market and deli. 



By; LESLIE GLAZIER-WERNER 
Lcson1ifG@sbcglobal,hct 

Expect big things from this 
family-run restaurant and mar- 
ket. Its heart and soul is not 
only in its cooking, but in its 
warm hospitality 

The atmosphere smacks of a 
sunny outdoor cafe in Italy. 
Yellows and earth tones prevail 
against bistro tables set with 
elegant white linen. With a 
seating capacity of 25, the din- 
ing area is cozy but not over- 
crowded. 

. My companion and I arrived 
during the height of the busy 
lunch hour, but still received a 
greeting from one of the 



Petrucci's staff, and patient 
attention from our server and 
cook, Josh. Many of the diners 
appeared to be regulars and 
were greeted on a first name 
basis. Pertrucci's Italian 
Market & Cafe offers a varied 
selection on both its lunch and 
dinner menus. The grilled pani- 
ni I ordered was a generous 
size, served hot with provolone, 
asiago, and fontinella cheese. 
My companion's caesar salad 
consisted of crisp greens, 
grilled chicken, and a delicious 
homemade dressing. Desserf 
was tasty fresh homemade can- 
noli and tiramisu. The wait 
time was minimal. 
The dinner menu offers clas- 



sics like lasagna and specialties 
like shrimp alfredo. Son Ronny 
Petrucci noted that their 
"cracker crust pizza is the best 
in die world". He also gave us a 
sample of the bread that 
accompanies their dinners: 
fresh from the oven and worth a 
visit in itself. 

Ronny said they have been 
running the restaurant for a 
year, and added the adjoining 
upscale Italian market and deli 
in February Petrucci's Italian 
Market & Cafe seems to have 
the ingredients for continued 
success: the entire Petrucci 
family enjoys serving cus- 
tomers as much as preparing 
fresh Italian fare. 



THAT 



FAMILY DINING PIACE 

Quaint, Qhwiminfy <£ ftcuniCtj. &dmd£ij, 

641 Barron Blvd. (Rt. 83), 
Graysloke (847) 543-9201 



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AUTHENTIC IlECIPES rruin Northern Italy 




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Incredible All You Can Eat Brunch! 



$21.95 Adults ^ $8.95 io and Under * 5 and Under Free 

Chef's Carving Station 

Chef's Omelet Station 

Huge Sweets Table 



Adult Brunches includes: 

Glass of Champagne, Sodas, Coffee, 

Tea & Juice. 

Tax, Gratuity & all other beverages extra 

Puk&'s grill 

476 W. Liberty, Wauconda 

Rt. 1 76 118 mile east ofRt 12 

847-526-0002 




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Carvedi Sirloin of Beef 

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Depot Street Station 
311 Depot Street 
Antioch, IL 
047-395-1036 
Fax:047-395-1026 



m 



~j errucci s 

Italian Market & Cafe 

{Conynik'nllytiKiilctl in Aniloi-lriVitli) Siailiin) 



Buff erball 
Assorted Turkey | 

*5.98 lb. 

UmH 2 lbs. 
Explrei May 1, 2007 



Krakow 
Polish Ham 

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. Uniit 2 lbs. 
iiplrtsMayl, 2007 



Smoked 
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s 4.98 lb. 

Umll2lbi. 
Expires Mo* 1, 2007 , 



Villa Frizzoni 
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Limit 2 Ibf . 
Eiplrtt May I, 2007 



|Volpi & Geneva I 
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Umlt 2 Ibf. 
Expires May 2, 1007 



Meunster 
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3.58 lb. 

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Open for 

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Monday-Saturday 

0am - 0pm 



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Assorted 

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78c lb. 

limit 4 



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Island Lake, IL 

847-526-7174 






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% 



Out & About 




Check it out ... 

Looking for something to do? Check out the 
events below for a variety of activities to enjoy. 



Have an upcoming event? 

To promote an upcoming event in 
LakeLife, submit news to Dani Schweigert 
at dschweigert@nwnewsgroup.com. 






Edition of April 27-May 3, 2007 ALL • Page 6B 



SOUNDS OF MUSIC 



NILES NORTH HIGH SCHOOL- 
9800 Lawler Ave., in Skokie; For 
more information, call (847) 
626-2122. Featuring: On April 28, 
the Niles North Vocal Jazz 
Festival will host a full day of 
clinics and rehearsal for 
Chicago-area and Midwest-area 
high schools and colleges, and 
will conclude with a perform- 
ance by CHAPTER 6, an a cap- 
pella jazz ensemble. Starting the 
show will be TAKE ONE, Niles 
North's award-winning vocal 
jazz ensemble. The concert will 
take place in Niles North 
Theatre: The Auditorium. Tickets 
cost $20. For more information 
about CHAPTER 6, visit 
www.chapter6.com. 

THE SHACK- 20886 Park Ave., 
in Mundelein; For more informa- 
tion, call (847) 566-7000, or 
visit www.shacksback.com. 
Featuring: At 10 p.m. on April 27, 
Redshirt; at 10 p.m. on April 28, 
Planet Groove; at 10 p.m. on 
May 4, AF KIN; at 10 p.m. on 
May 5, Agent Outcast; At 10 
p.m. on May 11, MR BLOTTO; At 
10 p.m. on May 12, Reverb 
Kings; at 10 p.m. on May 18, 
alternate past; and at 10 p.m. on 
May 10, ronnie baker brooks. 

EL BARRIO RESTAURANT & 
LOUNGE- 1122 Diamond Lake 
Road, in Mundelein. For more 
information, call (847) 566- 
0475, or visit www.elbar- 
riorestaurant.com. Featuring: At 
7 p.m. on April 29, The Lake 
County Folk Club presents a 
Songwriters Forum & Concert 
with Mark Hobbs, Donna Adler 
and Bob Smietana. 

LAKE FOREST SYMPHONY- At 

College of Lake County, 
Grayslake Campus, 19351 W. 
Washington St., in Grayslake. For 



more information, call (847) 
295-2135, or visit www.lakefor- 
estsymphony.org. Featuring: at 
8 p.m. on May 18 and 19, the 
symphony will perform its sea- 
son finale concert, under the 
direction of Alan Heatherington. 
The event will take place in 
CLC's James Lumber Center for 
the Performing Arts. A free pre- 
concert lecture by music 
researcher and composer Jim 
Kendros will take place at 7 p.m. 
Tickets cost $25, $35 and $45 
for adults. Senior tickets (for 
those 65 years old and older) 
cost $20, $30 and $45. Student 
tickets cost $10, $15 and $45. 



ZOO FUN 



BROOKFIELD ZOO- 8400 31st 
St, in Brookfield; For more infor- 
mation, call (708) 485-0263, or 
visit www.brookfieldzoo.org. 
Featuring: On April 28, the offi- 
cial opening of the new Fisher- 
Price Tot Spot, in the Hamill 
Family Play Zoo. During the cele- 
bration, families can participate 
in special activities that will 
take place In the Play Zoo. 
Children also can pose for a pic- 
ture (bring a camera) with 
Sonya Lee and Eddie, two char- 
acters from Little People from 
Fisher-Price. Beginning at 11 
a.m., children can get a Fisher- 
Price gift bag (whiie supplies 
last) filled with a Doodle Pro, a 
Little People giraffe and a DVD. 
A performance by Wiggleworms 
form the old Town School of 
Music will begin at 1 p.m. 



MUSEUM EVENTS 



INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM OF 
SURGICAL SCIENCE- 1524 North 
Lake Shore Drive, in Chicago; For 
more information, call (312) 
642-6502. Featuring: From May 
4 to July 20, two exhibitions will 
run concurrently as part of the 
museum's ongoing "Anatomy in 
the Gallery" contemporary art 



program. The exhibits are 
"Sympathetic Coordination" 
(www.laurasplan.com) and 
"Biological Cartography" 
(www.una-love.com/renee- 
info.html). For more information 
about "Anatomy in the Gallery," 
visit www.imss.org/anat- 
gallery.htm. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



GILDA'S CLUB- At Duffy's 
Tavern, 422 1/2 W. Diversey 
Parkway, in Chicago; For more 
information, call (312) 464-9900 
ext. 31, or e-mail 
gildasab@gmail.com. Featuring: 
At 6:30 p.m. on May 1, Gilda's 
Club Chicago Associate Board 
will host an euchre tournament. 

COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY, 
GRAYSLAKE CAMPUS- 19351 W. 
Washington St., in Grayslake; For 
more information, call (847)543- 
2000, or visit 

www.clcillinois.edu. Featuring: 
On April 27, the 26th Annual 
Student Art exhibition. The event 
will begin with an opening recep- 
tion and an awards presentation 
from 7 to 9 p.m. in the gallery; On 
April 28, the CLC Student 
Government Association and the 
Athletic Department will sponsor 
a run/walk event to raise money 
to complete construction of 
CLC's Fitness Trail. The event will 
begin at 10 a.m. at the Service 
Drive on the west side of Parking 
Lot 7A at Brae Loch Road; From 9 
a.m. to 9 p.m. on May 1 and 2, 
CLC will host a Spring Art Sale. 
The event will take place in the 
ARTcetera Sales and Rental 
Gallery, adjacent to the Robert T. 
Wright Community Gallery of Art; 
From noon to 2 p.m. on May 3, 
CLC will host a Cinco de Mayo 
celebration at the College of Lake 
County Lakeshore Campus in 
Waukegan. The event will take 
place outdoors in the courtyard 
at the corner of Genesee Street 



and Madison Avenue; From May 
4 to 6; CLC will host its 9th 
Annual "Fear No Art" event in the 
Studio Theatre of the James 
Lumber Center for the Performing 
Arts. The event will take place at 
7:30 p.m. on May 4 and 5 and at 
2 p.m. on May 6; At 8 p.m. on 
May 4 In the James Lumber 
Center for the Performing Arts, 
two-time Grammy-Award win- 
ning singer Kathy Mattea will 
perform. The concert will take 
place in the Mainstage Theatre. 
Tickets cost $31 to $36, $16 for 
students and $13 for children 
younger than 12 (prices include a 
$1 JLC restoration fee.) Tickets 
are available at the CLC Box 
Office, by calling (847) 543-2300, 
or online at 
www.ctcillinois.edu/tickets. 

ROSEMONT THEATRE- 5400 N. 
River Road, in Rosemont; For 
more information, call (847) 671- 
5100, or visit 

www.sesamestreetlive.com. 
Featuring: Sesame Street Live 
"Super Groverl Ready for Action." 
Performances will take place at 7 
p.m. on May 2; at 10:30 a.m. and 
7 p.m. on May 3; at 10:30 a.m. 
and 7 p.m. on May 4; at 10:30 
a.m. and 2 and 5:30 p.m. on May 
5; and at 1 and 4:30 p.m. on May 
6. Tickets can be bought by call- 
ing the box office at (847) 671- 
5100. To charge tickets by phone, 
call Ticketmaster at (312) 559- 
1212; to buy tickets online, visit 
www.ticketmaster.com. 

DUPAGE EXPO CENTER- 4050 

E. Main St., in St. Charles; For 
more information, call (866) 239- 
EXPO (3976), or visit 
www.dupageexpo.com. 
Featuring: From April 27 through 
29, an Antique Show and Sale. 
The event will take place from 5 
to 8 p.m: on April 27; from 10 a.m. 
to 7 p.m. on April 28; and from 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 29. Tickets 



cost $6 for each adult. For more 
information, call Zurko's Midwest 
Promotions at (715) 526-9769. 

OLD ST. PATRICK'S CHURCH- 

700 W. Adams St,, in Chicago; For 
more information, e-mail 
info@oIdstpats.org, or visit 
www.oldstpats.org. Featuring: On 
April 29, events to celebrate the 
church. One-hundred fifty years 
ago, in 1856, Old St. Patrick's 
Church hosted a dedication cere- 
mony for its church building on 
the corner of Adams and Des' 
Plaines. On April 29, the church 
will host "Rededication Sunday" 
to celebrate the present. This 
event will take place during the 
12:45 p.m. Mass. And to cele- 
brate the past, the church will 
host "A Journey Through Time," 
from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mass times 
are 7, 8:15, 9:30 and 11:15 a.m., as 
well as 12:45 and 5 p.m. 

LAKES COMMUNITY HIGH 

SCHOOL- 1600 Eagle Way, in 
Lake Villa; For more information, 
call (847) 838-7100, or visit 
www.lakeseagles.com. Featuring: 
from 7 to 8 p.m. on April 30, 
"Teens and Money: Preparing for 
Financial Independence." Great 
Lakes Credit Union will host the 
event as an unofficial partner in 
the Federal Reserve Bank of 
Chicago's Money Smart Week, 
celebrated April 30 through May 
5. 

CONTOURS EXPRESS- 1156 W. 

Maple Ave., in Mundelein; For 
more information, call (847) 388- 
3777. Featuring: From 12:30 to 2 
p.m. on May 5, a beginner-level 
seminar designed for women 
ages 14 and older will take place 
at Contours Express. The non- 
contact class will educate 
women on the practice and 
application of proven self- 
defense techniques. Cost is $40 
for Contours Express members, 



LakeCountyJournal5.com 

$50 for nonmembers; 

ROUND LAKE AREA LIBRARY- 
906 Hart Road, in Round Lake; 
For more information, call the 
library at (847) 546-7060. 
Featuring: Hosted by Great Lakes 
Credit Union in partnership with 
Mano a Mano Family Resource 
Center, an event to help Spanish- 
speaking customers learn to 
manage their money more wisely 
will take place from 5:30 to 7:30 
p.m. at the library. The event is 
part of Chicago's sixth annual 
Money Smart Week, which takes 
place April 30 through May 5. 
Free childcare also will be provid- 
ed. 



ON STAGE 



NOBLE FOOL THEATRICALS- 

At Pheasant Run Resort and 
Spa, at 4051 E. Main St., in St 
Charles; For more information, 
call (630) 443-0438, or (630) 
584-6342, or visit www.noble- 
fool.org. Featuring: Through July 
21, "The Musical of Musicals: 
The Musical!" Show times are 
at 8 p.m. on Thursdays and 
Fridays; 5 and 8:30 p.m. on 
Saturdays; and at 2 p.m.*on 
Sundays. Featuring: From May 2 
through June 9, "The Complete 
Work of William Shakespeare 
(abridged)." 

GENESEE THEATRE- 203 N. 
Genesee St., in Waukegan. For 
more information, call (847) 
782-2366, or visit www.gene- 
seetheatre.com. Featuring: 
Beginning at 10 a.m. on April 27, 
tickets for Donny Osmond will 
go on sale. Tickets cost $30 to 
$70. Tickets can be bought at 
the Genesee Theatre Box Office, 
through Ticketmaster, charge- 
by-phone at (312) 559-1212, or 
online at www, 

ticketmaster.com. Osmond will 
perform at 8 p.m. on Sept. 7 at 
the Genesee Theatre. 




St. < ':■ 
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iAKEUEL 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page 7B 



» DiningOut 



A treat for the sweet tooth 



Sweet Susies offers a 
place where everybody 
knows your name 

ByMATTPERA 

mpcra@nwncwsgroup.com 

Most people enjoy a restaurant or bar 
where you can walk in and the person 
behind the counter already knows what 
you're going to order. Maybe the dish or 
the drink is being made before you even 
order it. 

It's an ambiance that was made famous 
on the 1980s television show "Cheers," 
about a Boston bar "where everybody 
knows your name." 
' Like they say in the song, sometimes 
that's where you want to go. 

And, while Boston is more than 1,000 - 
miles away, that atmosphere can be found 
in downtown Grayslake at Sweet Susie's, 
a bakery and coffee shop at 170 Center St. 

"I have heard other customers refer to 
us as a 'Cheers' type of environment in 
Grayslake," owner Susie Rotman said. 
"We have a lot of regular customers, and I 
think that can be attributed to everybody 
getting to know each other when they do 
come here." 

Rotman opened Sweet Susie's a little 
more than two years ago, and the welcom- 
ing atmosphere is one of the the bakery's 
most noticeable qualities. 

When you walk in the door, you are 
met with a cheerful greeting by one of the 
staff, if not by Rotman herself. 

A dell case near the door displays a 
wide assortment of delicious desserts, 
including several varieties of cakes, cook- 
ies and pastries. Another trademark at 
Sweet Susie's is the collection of treats 
hand-dipped in chocolate on site. 

Some of the staples of chocolate-coated 
snacks include licorice, marshmallows 
and pretzels. And, according to Rotman, 
they are always experimenting. 

"We try to dip everything in chocolate, 
just to see how it works," she said with a 
laugh. 

Along with food for the sweet tooth, the 
bakery offers a variety of sandwiches, 
soups and salads. 

The best-seller on the menu is the "Off 
the Hook" sandwich, which includes deli- 
cious home-made chicken salad mixed 




Recycling seems to be 
the key to help make 
Earth a healthier place 

Discover how to reduce global warming 



Sandy Bresawr * sbreiifwr@nw1wvrt9roup.com 

Tim Neuschaefer makes a sandwich during the lunch rush at Sweet Susie's at 170 Center St., 
in Grayslake. Sweet Susie's signature dish is the "Off the Hook" sandwich. 



Sweet Susie's 



Where: 170 Center St. In downtown Grayslake 

Hours: 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through 

Friday; 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 7 a.m. to 

11 a.m. Sunday 

Signature dish: "Off the Hook" sandwich 

(Chicken salad mixed with swiss cheese, 

onions and crispy bacon, served on a toasted 

croissant and topped with sliced tomatoes) 

Smoking: Non-smoking 

For more information: Call (847) 548-8500 

with swiss cheese, onions and bacon on a 
toasted croissant and topped with sliced 
tomatoes. 

Once you bite into one of these, you 
understand right away why Sweet Susie's 
has sold about 4,800 of them since it 
opened. 

Other popular sandwiches on the 
menu include "The Al Bacore" (fresh tuna 
salad on toasted white bread topped with 
mixed greens, tomato, purple onion and a 
splash of oil and vinegar), "The Gobbler" 
(sliced oven-roasted turkey on toasted 
sourdough bread, topped with cheddar 
and provolone cheese, mixed greens, pur- 



« 

I have heard other customers 

refer to us as a 'Cheers' type of 

environment in Grayslake. 



Susie Rotman 

Owner of Sweet Susie's in Grayslake 



■99 



pie onion, tomato, oil and vinegar, spicy 
mustard and mayo) and even the kids" 
classic "Fluffanutter" (creamy peanut but- 
ter, marshmallow Fluff and sliced 
bananas on white bread). 

Sweet Susie's also offers several differ- 
ent roasts of gourmet coffee. 

The bakery has become a Grayslake 
staple in its two years of existence, with a 
steady crowd of loyal regulars persisting. 
Special offerings, like the Pain au 
Chocolat - a French pastry only available 
at Sweet Susie's on Saturdays - along 
with consistent service and quality food 
are ensuring those regulars will continue 
to come. 



ByPATDIECKHOFF 

wjnews@nwnowsgroup.com 

Climate change is the 
environmental issue of our 
time. 

The dramatic increase in 
carbon dioxide in Earth's 
atmosphere, which is caused 
from burning fossil fuels 
while destroying forests, is a 
major factor in the rise of 
worldwide average tempera- 
tures. 

In 2003, recycling in the 
US. reduced the amount of 
carbon dioxide in the air by 
33 million metric tons, 
which is about the annual 
emissions equivalent of 25 
million cars. This Is a clear 
indicator that any compre- 
hensive solution to global 
warming should include 
calls for Increased recycling. 

How does recycling and 
buying recycled products 
reduce energy use? Products 
made from recycled materi- 
als take less energy to pro- 
duce and, thus, use less fos- 
sil fuels. 

For example, it takes 95 
percent less energy to make 
a new aluminum can from 
an old aluminum can than it 
does from raw bauxite ore. 

It takes 70 to 80 percent 
less energy to make a new 
plastic bottle from an old 
plastic bottle than it does 
from the raw materials 
petroleum and natural gas. 

It takes 75 percent less 
energy to make new steel 
cans from old steel cans than 
it does from the raw materi- 
al iron ore. 

It takes 50 percent less 
energy to make new paper 
products from old paper 
than it does from trees. 

Also, recycling and buy- 
ing recycled paper products 
help prevent the loss of 
forests worldwide. Trees 



absorb carbon dioxide and 
reduce carbon levels. 

If every American would 
reduce their garbage by 10 
percent, each would save an 
additional 1,200 pounds of 
carbon dioxide annually. 
This reduction could be 
achieved by simply buying 
products with less packag- 
ing, or composting food 
scraps. 

If Americans stopped 
buying bottled water, it 
would reduce the amount of 
carbon dioxide in the air by 
1 billion pounds annually, 
which would be the equiva- 
lent of taking 100,000 cars off 
the road. 

Instead of buying bottled 
water, consider a water filter 
and either a high-density 
plastic (No. 5 through 7) or 
metal water container, and 
fill it each morning before 
going to work or school. 

Global warming can be 
reduced by eliminating 
waste, by increasing recy- 
cling at home and work and 
by buying products made of 
post-consumer content. 

For more information 
about recycling in Lake 
County, visit www.co. 
lake.tl.us/swalco. 

• Pa t Dieckhoff is the 
Waste Reduction Assistant 
for the Lou Marchi Total 
Recycling Institute at MCC. 
The Recycling Rounfrup is a 
cooperative effort of the 
McHenry County Planning 
and Development 
Department (815) 334-4560, 
the Lou Marchi Total 
Recycling Institute at MCC 
(815) 479-781 7, the McHenry 
County Defenders (815) 338- 
0393 and the Algonquin 
Township Road District. 
Con tact any of these groups 
with your recycling 
questions. 



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Page 8B • April 27, 2007 ALL 



JiKELlEL 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 






Musical waves of the future 



Chicago Symphony Orchestra makes its first CD 



The Chicago Symphony Orchestra 
recently took a leap into the future of 
music with a new, inhouse recording 
label called CSO Resound. 

The label's first offering, Mahler's 
Symphony No. 3, led by principal con- 
ductor Bernard Haitink, will be released 
as a digital download exclusively on 
iTunes.com beginning April 24. After a 
90-day period, the download will be avail- 
able through other channels, including 
Amazon.com, eMusic.com and 
Rliapsody.com. 

CDs will be available in the 
Orchestra's Symphony Store, as well as 
through the orchestra's Web site 



(www.cso.org) beginning May 1. CDs will 
then be in stores in Chicago and 
throughout the rest of the country 
beginning May 8 and will be released in 
Europe and Asia in early June. 

The symphony's new label recently 
received support through a three-year 
gift from Betty and Ralph Smykal. 

"To maintain CSO's stature in the 
international classical music industry, 
we must deliver the talents of our musi- 
cians to their listeners in whatever form 
necessary, including digital downloads 
and private label recordings," Betty 
Smykal said in a release. "We are proud 
to be involved with CSO Resound." 



The new release also Is possible 
through funding from the Boeing 
Company. 

"Part of what makes Chicago such a 
great city is that it is the home of one of 
the world's best orchestras," said Nora 
Moreno Cargie, Boeing's director of 
Global Corporate Citizenship In 
Chicago, in a release. 

As part of its new recording plan, 
CSO will self-produce at least six new CD 
releases during the next three years, 
with all upcoming releases selected from 
live recordings of CSO concerts, accord- 
ing to a release. 

For more information about the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra or CSO 
Resound, call (312) 294-3333, or visit 
www.cso.org. 



Men get exposed 



Men thinking with their 
heads might sound like an 
impossible dream to some 
women, but a new play Is 
ready to let men explain their 
side of relationships. 

"Men Exposed ... Thinking 
with Your Head" is a new 
comedy presented by 
Ouroboros Theatre Company. 
It will take place at 11:30 p.m. 
Friday and Saturday nights 
through May 26 at Theatre 
Building Chicago, 1225 W. 
Belmont Ave., in Chicago. 

"Men Exposed" tells the 
story of eight guys on a bach- 
elor's last night out in Vegas, 
.as they defend themselves 
against women's tales of "the 
change," "respect" and "love." 

The one-act comedy was 
written by Chicago play- 
wright Scott Woldman and is 
directed by Ouroboros 
Theatre Company member 
Jose A. Garcia, who makes 
his directorial debut. 



Want to go? 



What: "Men Exposed ... Thinking 

with Your Head" (a late-night 

comedy) 

When: 11:30 p.m. Friday and 

Saturday nights through May 26 

Where: Theatre Building Chicago, 

1225 W. Belmont Ave., in Chicago 

Tickets: $18 ($15 preview). To 

buy tickets, call 

Ouroboros Theatre Company's 

box office at (773) 

327*5252, or visit www.theatre 

buildingchicago.org. 

Tickets also can be bough 

through Ticketmaster at 

(312) 559-1212, or by visiting 

www.ticketm3ster.com. 

For more information, 
contact artistic director Lara 
Filip-Tibble at (708) 254-0928, 
or visit www. 
ouroborostheatre.com. 



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It's closing time 

Theatre season ends with 'Ragtime' 



Porchlight Music 

Theatre concludes its 2006- 
07 season with the musical 
"Ragtime." 

The musical is based on 
EX. Doctorow's novel about 
a Harlem musician, a 
wealthy New York family 
and a Latavian Jewish 
immigrant. The play focus- 
es on the timeless contra- 
dictions of wealth and 
poverty, freedom and preju- 
dice, hope and despair and 
love and hate. 

The production will run 
through May 27 at Theatre 
Building Chicago, 1225 W. 
Belmont Ave. Ticket prices 
cost $35 ($2B for students 
and seniors) for Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday per- 
formances and $34 ($27 for 
students and seniors) for 
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performances will begin 
May 3 and will start at 7:45 
p.m. 

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information, call the 
Theatre Building Chicago's 
box office at (773) 327-5252, 
or visit www.theatrebuild- 
ingchicago.org. Tickets also 
can be bought through 
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1212, or online at www.tick- 
etmaster.com. Group dis- 
counts are available by call- 
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» RelishTheAmericanTable 



Rice replacement 



By MARTIN 800 

It's perfect for the gluten- 
sensitive, friendly to dieters 
and packed with protein, mag- 
nesium and iron. It's quinoa, 
of course. 

Although it's never 
reached the popularity of 
rice, quinoa (pronounced . 
KEEN-wah) has an earthy and 
mildly sweet taste and Is just 
as versatile. Plus, it cooks in 
less than 15 minutes. 

Indigenous to South 
America, quinoa is the seed of 
a plant in the spinach family 
and was given a position of 
honor In the Incan diet. 

While Invading Spaniards 
dismissed it as too primitive 
for their tastes, the Incas 
regarded It as sacred and 
called it chisaya mama, or 
"mother of all grains." 

Until recently, quinoa was 
consumed mainly hy health- 
food nuts, but now chefs 
across the country are using 
it as a substitute for rice and 
other grains in side dishes, 
salads and stuffings. 

Rinse quinoa first to 
remove its slightly bitter coat- 
ing (commercial quinoa is 
usually pre-rinsed), then cook 
it exactly like rice, in broth or 
water. And use in any dish 
that uses rice. 

Shrimp, Sausage and Quinoa 
Jambalaya 
(Serves 8) 

Ingredients: 

4 1/2 cups lower-sodium chicken 

broth, divided 

2 cups (12 ounces) quinoa 

1 tablespoon olive oil 

1/2 pound smoked turkey kiel- 

basa, sliced in 1/4-inch rounds 

1 large onion, chopped 

1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced 




4 garlic cloves, peeled and 

chopped 

1 cup spicy V-8 juice 

1 pound medium shrimp, peeled 

and deveined 

1 cup frozen peas 

1 cup grape tomato halves 

Directions: 

Combine 4 cups chicken broth 
and quinoa in a medium 
saucepan, Bring to a boil, reduce 
heat to low, cover and cook 15 
minutes. 

Heat oil in a skillet, and add 
kielbasa, onion, bell pepper and 
garlic. Saute about 10 minutes, 
or until vegetables are tender. 
Add remaining broth and V-8 
juice; bring to simmer. Add 
shrimp and simmer 5 minutes, 
or until done. Add peas, toma- 
toes and cooked quinoa, and 
toss. 

• Martin Booe is a contiibu- 
tor to Relish Magazine. Look 
For Relish magazine each 
montli in tlie Lake County 
Journals. For mow Relish 
recipes, to sign up for a biweek- 
ly newsletter, or to leave a note 
on a Relish message boairl, 
log on to www.i'elishmag.eom. 



» EveryMom 



Time for 'the talk' 



OK, so I'm a little uncom- 
fortable writing this column. I 
admltit. ■ ■-■•-'-•'» jet-. 

You see, my three babies 
are going to grow up and 
become nuns. So I won't ever 
have to worry about the whole 
sex talk thing. 

They're not going to date. 
They're going to spend their 
evenings watching reruns of 
"Little House on the Prairie" 
with their parents. 

And then, bam, I'm 
snapped back to reality with 
questions like the following. 

// is now time to have "the talk" 
with my 10-year-old son. I just found 
something that he and his friends 
wrote. Nothing terrible, but it tells me 
that sex is something they are talking 
about I'm comfortable with talking 
about the feelings that go with sex, 
the risks, and the fact that he should 
wait until maturity, etc. I'm even 
comfortable with birth control and 
such. I just don't know how much to 
teit him about the actual act - how 
many details do you give? What 
words do you use exactly? And how 
do you know when enough details are 
enough? Please help. 

Put simply, give as many 
details as needed to answer 
your son's questions, and use 
proper terms as you explain 
exactly how sex works, 
experts say 

Most of all, make sure you 
tell the truth. 

"But in a way that is not 
more complicated or sophisti- 
cated than they need, given 
their age," said Patrick Tolan, 




Kunzer 



Northern Lake County Quilters Guild 



,• i • 



Lake County Impressions 




April 28th & April 29th 
10:00am - 4:00pm 

200 Quilts on display made hy Guild members 

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Lake Villa, Corner of Cross Lake Rri. & Deep Lake Kri. 



a psychiatry professor and 
director of the Institute for 
Juvenile Research at the 
University of Chicago. 

Both parents should sit 
down with the child and ask 
him or her what he or she 
knows, experts say. Tell the 
child you'd like to talk to him 
or her about sex. 

If the child says they 
already know about it, don't 
give up, Tolan said. 

"They'll think they know 
when they don't," he said. 
"Say, 'I know you know. Let . 
me just say this so I know 
you've heard it from me.' 
Sometimes it works. 
Sometimes it doesn't. You 
have to keep after it." 

And make sure to talk 
about the values that go along 
with sex, about respect and 
self-care and care for others, 
and that sex should he part of 
an appropriate relationship at 
an appropriate age, he said. 

"It's very helpful if you can 
rehearse what you want to say, 
just like you do with anything 
you're new at," he said. "If 
you can be calm, if you think 
it through or make some 
notes, that will help them 
calm down a little," 

If a child aged 2, 3 or 4 asks 
where babies come from, tell 
the child, '"Mommy and daddy 
get together. He puts his penis 
in her vagina,' those kinds of. 
things," Tolan said. 

Children will be curious 
about sex long before age 10, 
said Bennett Leventhal, a psy- 
chiatry professor and director 
of the Center for Child Mental 
Health & Developmental 
Neuroscience, so start early. 

• Columnist Jaini Kunzer Is 
the mother of Summer; 2, and 
hifant twins Anna and Lilly. 
She writes about tlte everyday 
cliallenges facing parents. You 
also can connect witli Jami 
online Tuesday, Thursday and 
Saturday tlwough her blog, 
winch can be found at 
www.nwherald.com. Reach 
Jami atjkunzer® 
mvnewsgroup.com, or (815) 
459-4122, 




% 



^A^MAAAM^iA 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournaIs.com 



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5. Emotional disposition 
9. Lopped 

II, Hollandaise or tartar 

13. Member of a governing board 

14. Japanese firm 

16. Fancuil Hall statue 

18. Samuel Haya_a, U.S. Senator 

19. Any high mountain 

20. Baseball championship play- 
off 

21. Melon, cucumbers, pumpkin 

22. Ceases to live 

24. Lacking the sense of hearing 

25. Incline from vertical 
(Geology) 

26. Pass into 

28. Samarium 

29. Mown grass 

30. One who accompanies anoth- 
er 

32. Address for a nobleman 

35. center: earthquake focus 

36. Rupee 

37. Olive oil acid 

39. The surface of an object 

41. Departure from the vertical 

43. From a distance 

44. Counterbalance to obtain net 
weight 

45. Magnitude relations 

47. Large Australian flightless bird 

48. Group insurance 
49. 5th lis. President 
51. IHOP specialty 

53. Noticeable 

54. Confiscates 

55. Repented 

56. A light fitful sleep 

57. Digits 

DOWN 

1. Proclaims loudly 

2. A people of W.Africa 

3. Poker stakes 




4. Spun 

5. Disfigures 

6. Opposite of ins 

7. B Raton - 33428 

8. Adorned with finery 

9. Sugar, butter and pecan candy 

10. Most beloved 

11. WW II Allied HQ 

12. Surface configuration 
13. 18th Hebrew fetter 

15. _Jima, WW II battlefield 

17. Circle width (abbr.) 

21. Disc jockey bribe 

23. Withdraw from an organization 

25. Circle of light around the moon 

27. A strong cord 

29. Hello 

31. Rhode Island 

32. Joan Rivers' daughter 

33. Game officials 

34. Engagement stone 

36. An established ceremony 
38. Holds vinegar for the table 




39. Park Hotel Kenmare Spa 

40. Pressed 

41. Domesticates 

42. Love apple 

44. Thrust horse power (abbr.) 

45. Middle Eastern liquor 

46. The lawmaker of Athens 

49. American born music 

50. Number of cat's lives 
52, Data executive 



» Horoscope 

TAURUS- Apr 21/May 21 
Something that happened In the past has 
recently come back to bother you, Taurus. 

GEMINI- May 22/Jurt 21 
If you do something nice for a person close to 
you, you will be rewarded ten-fold, Gemini, 

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 

You will gain something this week, Cancer. 



LE0-Jul23/Aug23 

Show coworkers that you are willing to put in 
the hard work needed, Leo. 

VIRGO- Aug 24/Sept 22 
Be friendly to strangers, Virgo, but be on your 
guard, too. 

LIBRA- Sept 23/0ct 23 
Mending fences will help a relationship, Libra. 



SCORPIO- Oct 24/Nov 22 
You have to learn that the world doesn't 
revolve around you, Scorpio. 

SAGITTARIUS- Nov 23/Dec 21 
You are prone to causing arguments when they 
are not justified, Sagittarius. 

CAPRICORN- Dec 22/Jan 20 

Focus on your creativity this week, Capricorn. 



Maybe there is a project you wanted to start or 
finish. Redecorating is a good way to develop 
any creative ideas that are swarming and put 
them lo use. 

AQUARIUS- Jan 21/Feb 18 

Don't let the negative gossip of others rub off 
on you this week, Aquarius. Continue to be the 
diplomat, and you'll keep your friends' support 
and companionship. 



PISCES- Feb 19/Mar20 
Pisces, when an important decision arises, the 
answer is to try something different rather than 
doing what you always do. 

ARIES- Mar 2VApr 20 

You must take your finances more seriously, 
Aries. You haven't been paying much attention 
to your cash flow in the last few months. 
Resources can deplete quickly. 



» ElementsOf 
TheRidiculous 




Jana 
Thompson 



Losing the 
connection 



A few weeks ago, I was 
nearly driven to dancing 
naked in my living room and 
eating cat food. 

After waiting four hours for 
my Internet-telephone-TV 
hookup to arrive a few Fridays 
ago, I started to get annoyed. 
The cable company called to 
say it would be late - very late. 
I had to go to work that after- 
noon, so I wrangled a Saturday 
appointment at 10 a.m. 

After a few as-pleasant-as-I- 
could-be phone calls Saturday, 
the installer arrived at 2:15 
p.m. Might I add that this was 
not his fault I have no beef 
with cable installers. 

Two hours after installa- 
tion, the phone and Internet 
quit working. I called the cable 
company and was told that a 
line technician would come 
Monday. Monday came and 
went with no call. I was start- 
ing to crack. 

I decided to cancel the serv- 
ice so that I wouldn't end up in 
the looney bin. 

Story in my own newspa- 
per. 

ELGIN - A 30-year-old Elgin 
woman was living in a nest 
she made out of coaxial cables 
in a local park's tree. But she Is 
sane and living in her home 
again after firing her cable 
company on Wednesday After 
days of fighting with customer 
service reps to get the stupid 
thing set up, the cable compa- 
ny shut off her service imme- 
diately How's that for efficien- 
cy? 

The cable company gave 
her an address to return the 
equipment they installed. 

"I don't know when I'll 
return it," she said. "Maybe 
between 8 a.m. and noon or 1 
and 5 p.m. Or maybe next 
June." 

• • Jana Thompson is a 
columnist for the Noiih West 
News Group. She can be 
reached atjthompson@ 
nwnewsgroup.com. 



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10B 

Edition of April 27-May 3, 2007 
LakeCourttyJournals.com 



# 



HIGH SCHOOL SCOREBOARD: Take a look | COLLEGE OF LAKE COUNTY: CLC finds a 

at this week's high school sports schedule. i new basketball coach in high school coaching 

PAGE 11B champion Tom Shields. PAGE 11B 



NASCAR THIS WEEK: Get the breakdown 
about who's hot and who's not for the upcoming 
races. PAGE 14B 



» SideLines 




Daniel J. 
Patrick 



Sports will 
rise again 



The scene is familiar: an other- 
wise law-abiding young man has 
seemingly lost his mind as he 
spends hours adorning himself 
from head to toe in gallons of 
skin-suffocating paint. 

An abstract art project, you 
ask? Not so much. A myth-busting 
1 experiment meant to debunk the 
urban legend of death by skin suf- 
focation? No. 

Well, if you're reading this, 
you've taken a look at the sports 
page and you probably know 
exactly why such a normal young 
man would partake in such a 
crazy activity: sports. 

Crazy, crazy, sports. 

I am a White Sox fan, born and 
raised and so is my co-worker, 
Lake County Journals News 
Editor Matt Pera. Now why would 
the two of us torment yet another 
co-worker, Steve Peterson? 

Because he's a Cubs fan, and 
that's just how it goes in sports. 

Some of our childish exploits 
included constantly defiling a 
poster of Wrigley Field by taping 
pictures of Ozzie Guillen and U.S. 
Cellular field on it, and badgering 
our Cub fan coworkers with that 
whole World Series tiling. Along 
with making sure that each and 
every South Side victory is felt in 
the newsroom. And it's a safe bet 
that it's not too much different in 
any other part of Chicago where 
there's a Sox fan and a Cubs fan in 
the same room. 

it's an amazing thing to see, 
whether it's at a litUe league 
game, between two high schools, 
or especially at a game between a 
bunch of overpaid buffoons at the 
professional level, people can hate 
each other just because they're 
wearing different colors. Fights 
break out, tilings are destroyed 
and ail common sense can seem- 
ingly fly out the window when 
there's a game to be played. 

But what I'm most proud of 
when it comes to sports is that 
while most of us are fanatical 
about our allegiances, we are also 
willing to let them go. Colors run 
deep, but they aren't deep enough 
to not see the important tilings in 
life. 

Why? Because while sports are 
so very important to so very many 
of us, it's often far from the most 
important thing. As last week 
brought a tragedy to the forefront 
for our country, sports gave us a 
nice shelter from it all, but thank- 
fully, none of us need shelter from 
sports. 

So while I might make a jerk of 
myself just because I love a team, 
I also love the fact that we can all 
let it go at the end of the day. 

'Daniel J. Patrick is tlie sports 
editor for Uie Lake County 
Journals. Write to hitn at 
dpatrick@mvnewsgroup.com.. 



» Softball: Warren 4, Lakes 4 (11 innings) 



This game is all tied up 




Sandy Dressner - sbreswierj'nwnowsgroup.eom 

Warren's Alex Booker, a freshman, is safe as she slides into second base despite Lakes infielder Ashton Pfeifer attempt to tag her out during a game. 

Lakes, Warren battle in a 4-4 stalemate after 11 innings in conference play 



By DANIEL J. PATRICK 

dpatrick@nwncwsgro up.com 

GURNEE - Ties aren't very com- 
mon in softball, but at a North 
Suburban Conference matchup 
between Warren and Lakes, there 
was no other choice. After 11 long 
Innings and more than three hours, 
as much as both teams wanted to win 
the game, the light wouldn't allow it 
■as the contest was called with a 4-4 
score. 

"This definitely doesn't happen 
very much," Lakes Coach Julie 
Sexton said. "We're going to have to 
finish it on another date and we 



might even have to bump a non-con- 
ference game if neither of the teams 
has an open date, but this is definite- 
ly not too common." 

As uncommon as it was, Lakes 
had a chance to end the game the old 
fashioned way in the ninth inning. 
Jamie Braden jacked a double to 
right field to start the Eagles off with 
a runner in scoring position with no 
outs. Jennifer Ignoffo then singled 
up the right field line and Braden 
went for the go-ahead run. 

Unfortunately for Lakes and 
Coach Sexton, Braden was caught at 
the plate, 

"If we could have gotten her two 



or three feet farther down the line, 
she would have scored easily," Sexton 
said. "She was looking for the call 
from me to go for the run, and if 
Warren makes the right throw to the 
cutoff man, we send her home and 
they did that. ... It was the higher per- 
centage play and that's why I sent her 
home." 

For the Blue Devils, the tie was 
just as hard of an ending as a loss 
would be. While there's still a chance 
Warren could pull out the win in 
makeup innings, Blue Devil Coach 
Carri Nichols was not pleased with 
her team's play. 

"That was our first extra-inning 



game of the season," Nichols said. 
"We definitely didn't play our best: 
and we hoped to end the game by the.; 
seventh inning. It should have been; 
finished by the seventh inning, but it 
was just another set of unfortunate - 
mistakes that led to runs." 

Make no mistake, Sexton wasn't ' 
too pleased, either. 

"If we can stay away form unfor- 
tunate mental errors, we make the 
game easy for ourselves," Sexton 
said. "If we do that, we win the game ; 
and we go home an .hour ago, but 
that's not the way it happened." 

See SOFTBALL, page 11B 



» Baseball: Antioch 2, Lakes 1 



Sequoits pull out close win over rival Lakes 



By DANIEL J. PATRICK 

dpatrick@nwnewsgroup.com 

ANTIOCH - Sometimes, 
rivalries just aren't all 
they're cracked up to be - or 
at least that's what the 
coaches would have you 
believe. 

On the Antioch athletics 
Web site, the top announce- 
ment was, "IT'S LAKES 
WEEK," building up how the 



Sequoits and Eagles would 
lock horns in baseball, soft- 
ball, boys and girls track, 
and boys volleyball. 

In front of a relatively 
large crowd from both 
schools, the Eagles and 
Sequoits locked horns to .the 
tune of a 2-1 baseball classic. 
Unfortunately for Lakes, 
Antioch defended their 
home turf with the close 
North Suburban Conference 



Prairie Division win. 

Like all good coaches, 
Lakes skipper Mark 
Tschappat downplayed the 
entire Lakes-Antioch deal. 

"Honestly, everything we 
talked about was focused on 
what we had to do," 
Tschappat said. "I just really 
believe that when we start 
worrying about other teams 
and who we're playing, we'll 
have problems. It doesn't 



matter, what we have to do is 
play our game and execute. 

"It's just a division game 
and we want to win the divi- 
sion, whether it's Antioch or 
Grant next week." 

Antioch Coach Paul Petty 
let a little bit more hang out 
about the situation, but not 
by much. Petty said that 
while he would prefer his 
players not focus on the 
Antioch-Lakes rivalry, 



there's nothing wrong with 
getting fired up about the ' 
game. 

"I tried to tell the kids-/' 
that it doesn't matter who" 
we're playing and to try not 
to get caught up in the whole- 
Lakes thing," Petty said. 'T 
said if they want to, it's fine" 
with me, but they should try ' 
not to." 

See BASEBALL, page 11B 



Quick Hitters 




Bjorn Jaranson 



Bjorn Jaranson - Antioch 

A 23-5 baseball score might look like a typo 
on paper, but that's exactly what happened 
between Antioch and Round Lake in a North 
Suburban Conference game last week. For the 
Sequoits, Bjorn Jaranson was a big part of it 
as he went 4-for-4 and drove in five runs to 
lead Antioch to the 18-run victory. 



Kariann Hill - Grant 

Grand slams are special things in softball, 
but to break an extra inning tie, well, that's 
downright unbelievable. Facing a 1-1 tie in the 
eighth inning with the bases ful), Grant senior 
Kariann Hill did what most players would only 
dream of - she drilled a grand slam for the 5- 
1 conference win over Vernon Hills. 




Kariann Hill 



To nominate a student athlete for Quick Hitters, please send submis- 
sions to Daniel J. Patrick at dpatrick@nwnewsgroup.com 



Game of the Week 




Grayslake Central Rams 



Grayslake North Knights 



What: Baseball * 

Where: Grayslake Central baseball field 

When: 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 30 

Splitsville is a hard place to be, but it sure makes for great 
sports rivalries. After Lakes and Antioch battled it out last 
week, now its former mates Grayslake North and Grayslake 
Central's turn to battle for the home turf. Calling all Grayslake 
baseball fans, it's time to see what's what and see if the young 
North Knights can take on the powerful Central Rams. 



»GirlsTrack 




Chris Padgett • cpadgelUStiwnemgroup.com 

Lauren Serum and Courtney Kimes, of Wauconda, compete in the 
final for the 400m hurdles at the Wauconda Invitational Track Meet*- 
See story page 18B. 



ij +\£Ait-iJ\i£i*&L -liitjtii. 



I 







Uke County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



»UpcomingGames 
Friday, April 27 

Baseball 

Grayslake North at Prairie Ridge, 

4:30 p.m. 

Warren at Grant, 4:30 p.m. 

Girls Soccer 

Grayslake North at Prairie Ridge, 

4:30 p.m. 

Softball 

Grant at Warren, 4:30 p.m. 
Huntley at Grayslake North, 4:30 
p.m. 

Boys Track 

Grant Invitational, 4 p.m. 

Boys Volleyball 
Lakes at Antioch, 6 p.m. 
Warren at North Chicago, 6:30 
p.m. 

Saturday, April 28 

Baseball 

Antioch at Grayslake North, 10 

a.m.(DH) 

Carmel at Marian Catholic, 10 

a.m.(DH) 

Fremd at Warren, 10 a.m.(DH) 

Lake Forest Academy at Lake, 

10:30 am. (DH) 

Softball 

Lakes at Niles North, 10 a.m. (DH) 

Boys Tennis 

Lakes Tournament at Lakes, 9 

a.m. 

i 

Monday, April 30 

Baseball 

Grayslake North at Grayslake 
Central, 4:30 p.m. 
Notre Dame at Carmel, 4:30 p.m, 
Warren at Deerfield, 4:30 p.m. 

Girls Soccer 

Grayslake North at Lakes, 4:30 

p.m. 

Softball 

Deerfield at Warren, 4:30 p.m. 
Lakes at Warren, 4 p.m. (resumed 
from April 23) 

Boys Tennis 

Antioch at Carmel, 4:30 p.m. 

Boys Track 

Round Lake, Grant at Antioch, 
4:30 p.m. 

Girls Track 

Antioch, Grant at Round Lake, 
4:30 p.m. 

Tuesday, May 1 

Baseball 

Antioch at Wauconda, 4:30 p.m. 
Cary-Grove at Lakes, 4:30 p.m. 
Stevenson at Warren, 4:30 p.m. 

Girls Soccer 

Grayslake Central at Grayslake 

North, 6:30 p.m. 

Wauconda at Carmel, 4:30 p.m. 

Softball 

Grayslake Central at Grayslake 

North, 4:30 p.m. 

Lakes at Glenbrook South, 4:45 

p.m. 

Warren at Stevenson, 4:30 p.m. 

Wauconda at Antioch, 4:30 p.m. 

Boys Volleyball 

Antioch at Wanen, 6 p.m. 
Carmel at Notre Dame, 6 p.m. 
Vernon Hills at Lakes, 6 p.m. 

Wednesday, May 2 

Baseball 

Grayslake Central at Grayslake 
North, 4:30 p.m. 

Girls Soccer 

Grant at Round Lake, 6:15 p.m. 
Prairie Ridge at Grayslake North, 
6:30 p.m. 

Softball 

Glenbrook North at Warren, 4:30 
p.m. 

Prairie Ridge at Lakes, 4:30 p.m. 
< 

Thursday, May 3 

» 

i 

Baseball 

Grayslake North at Johnsburg, 

4;30 p.m. 

Wauconda at Antioch, 4:30 p.m. 

»AII school athletic schedules 
are subject to change, check 
with the individual schools for 
more information. 



SPORTS 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page 11B 




' pliiyoll rjame. # II nocossary 

sansEBSBSuaBSHn 



FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 



at Miami* 

7 p.m. 

CSN, ESPN, 

FM-105.9 



at St Louis 
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CSN, 
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at SL Louts 
2:55 p.m. 

Fox, 
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LA ANGELS 

6:05 p.m. 

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at Miami* 
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ABC, 

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at Houston 
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CSN, FM- 
105.9 



at St Louis 

7:05 p.m. 

ESPN, 

AM-720 



LA. ANGELS 
1:05 p.m. 

CSN, 
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at Pittsburgh 

6:05 p.m. 

WGN, 

AM-720 



PHILADELPHIA 
7 p.m. 

ESPN2, 
FM-105.9 



at Miami's 
TBD 



at Pittsburgh 

6:05 p.m. 

CSN, 

AM-720 



at Seattle 

9:05 p.m. 

CSN-plus, 

AM-720 



at Pittsburgh 

11:55 a.m. 

CSN, 

AM-720 



at Seattle 

2:35 p.m, 

CSN, 

AM-720 




Sandy Giessnc/ ■ sbrosswr .n nwnewsgroiip.cuni 

Janae LeBaron, of Lakes, bunts the ball to advance the runner during a game against Warren. After 11 
innings of play the game was called at a 4-4 tie. 

Pitchers shine in NSC conference tie 



• SOFTBALL 

Continued from 10B 

Lakes had a bright spot in 
senior pitcher Claire Seaver. 
Against Warren, Seaver 
pitched all 11 innings and 
faced 46 batters for 12 strike- 
outs compared to just three 
walks and six hits in the out- 
ing. 

"She was having a very 
hard year, but I think that 



this could have been her 
.breakout performance," 
Sexton said. "She had a very 
good season last year, but I 
think she's been working 
hard to find herself this year. 
... This was a very good out- 
ing for her and hopefully, 
she'll be able to ride, this 
momentum for the rest of the 
season." 

Blue Devil pitchers Taryn 
Parker and Sam Berrios 
made life just as hard for the 



Eagles as they struck out 
five, but gave up twice as 
many hits as Seaver. With, the 
tie, Warren still stands at 4-7 
on the season while Lakes 
has an identical record. 

The two schools will have 
to meet at a later open date to 
finish off the game for a deci- 
sion. The teams will decide 
the game at 4 p.m. on Monday, 
April 30, just before Warren's 
scheduled game with 
Deerfield. 



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mt[Commtintty Nqws of Lako County Illinois' ' 

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VOCAL SPOKTS LAKCUtC OPINION OBITUARIES* 







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LakeCountyJournals.com 



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ANTIOCH • FOX LAKE • GRAYSLAKE 

Breaking and Updated News and Information •'< 






GURNEE • LAKE VILLA • LIBERTYVILLE r7 ,; 

Video Broadcasts and Slide Shows . - -': 

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Daily and 5-day Video Weather Forecasts 

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ANTIOCH • FOX LAKE • GRAYSLAKE 
Place a Classified Ad; took for Jobs, Homes, Autos 

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Links to Local Business' Web 'sites 

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WADSWORTH • WAUCONDA • WAUKEGAN 

- '■ ■ 

Log on and join our community today! 



The next step 

CLC names new basketball coach 



By DANIEL J. PATRICK 

dpatrlck(o nwnewsgroup.com 

GRAYSLAKE - Just two 
years removed from a national 
tournament bid, the College of 
Lake County mens basketball 
program gets its third coach 
in as many years. This time, 
It's decorated former high 
school coach Tom Shields. 

Shields, who has 26 years of 
high school coaching under 
his belt, was named as the 
Lancers' coach last week, At 
the high school ranks, Shields 
was highly successful, earn- 
ing a lifetime record of 430-222 
and guiding Providence St. 
Mel to a No. 1 
ranking In 
the nation by 
USA Today 
and Street 
and Smith. 

"After we 
h ad 
announced an 
opening, he 
called and left 
his name, and 
1 was think- 
ing, 'Wow is 
that the Tom 
Shields I 
think it is?"* 
CLC athletic 
director Chad 
Good said. 

"He applied 

for it, we 
Interviewed, 
and the rest is history." 

CLC let go first-year coach 
Raphael Howard after a 
mediocre 4-20 campaign last, 
year. Howard was hired after 
Shawn Chism left the program 
after six seasons and had his 
last team take third in NJCAA 
Division II national tourna- 
ment. 

As for Shields, he stands 
tied with six other coaches for 
the most schools coached to 
the state finals. Not only did 
he take Providence-St. Mel to 
the state championship in 1985 
as the last of four straight 
appearances, he also was able 
to take Hales Franciscan to 
the state finals in 1993. 

Thanks to his great success 
at the high school level, CLC 
was not his first brush with 
college coaching. Over the 
years, he has been offered 
assistant coaching positions 
with Division I programs such 
as Iowa State, Bradley, 
Creighton and Loyola. 

"I've been teaching for 32 
years and one thing that I've 
learned is that timing and 
opportunity cannot be sched- 



tf 

Now, I decided that 

maybe some of the 

other stuff had 

passed me by and this 

was the perfect 

opportunity to move on 

to the college game. 

Tom Shields 

New College of Lake County, 
boys basketball coach 



99 



uled," Shields said. "The cir- 
cumstances just weren't right. 
I almost ended up at Bradley 
and Creighton and Loyola ... 
but I love the high school 
game. Now, I decided that 
maybe some of the other stuff 
had passed me by and this was 
the perfect opportunity to 
move on to the college game." 
Even though he's spent less 
than a week on the job, Shields 
has hit the ground running as 
he's already signed Waukegan 
High School senior Justin 
Richmond. Richmond, a tal- 
ented 6-foot-5 perimeter play- 
er, played under Shields when 
he was an assistant with the 
Bulldogs last 
year. Good 

thinks that 

Shields will 
have no trou- 
ble putting 
getting more 
top-tier area 
recruits like 
Richmond. 

"He's so 
well known 
around this 
area, that 
he'll be able 
to recruit 
just on his 
former play- 
ers that are 
coaches 
themselves," 
Good said. "I 
think it'll be 
a mix [between local and 
national recruits], I think that 
there's local drawing power 
now just because of his repu- 
tation and that'll open some 
eyes to our program." 

Shields' goals are just as 
"right here, right now" as his 
recruiting is. His immediate 
goal is simple: win lots and 
win now. 

"We're going to try to win 
the conference and get to the 
nationals, get as good as we 
can as quick as we can, that's 
the most accurate way to put 
it," Shields said. 

After almost three decades 
coaching the game, one would 
think that there's very little, 
CLC's newest coach hasn't 
seen. But one thing that has 
evaded him is the college 
game. 

"I know of the Skyway con- 
ference, but actually coaching 
at the junior college level is 
something new to me; it's like 
starting all over again," 
Shields said. "It's almost like a 
rebirth. I'm like a kid; school 
ends and I get to go to the 
gym." 



Antioch run support, 
pitching aid in victory 



• BASEBALL 

Continued from 10B 

As for the game itself, 
Lakes got its run in the top of 
the fourth thanks to an RBI 
double from senior Jeremy 
Pohlman. 

Pohlman's extra-base hit 
was the only Eagle hit of the 
night as pinch runner Nick 
Thackston was on base 
thanks to an Antioch walk 
earlier in the 
inning. 

Antioch 
pitcher Jeff 
Baird was 
stellar in the 
game. Baird 
(2-2) pitched 
a complete 
game and 
gave up just 
one hit and 
two walks 

and collected 

seven strike- 
outs in the 
win. 

"Jeff Baird pitched a great 
game," Petty said. "That was 
one of his better performanc- 
es, but he's been trotting out 
and putting us up a couple of 
times this year, so this is 
what we expect from him." 

Baird got just enough run 
support thanks to six 
Antioch hits in the game. 

Trevor Popp led the way 
with a single and a double to 
finish 2-for-4 on the night, 
Craig Hoist and Brett 
Paramski also singled in the 
win. 

The Sequoits got both of 



U 

We just made some little 

mistakes, but that's been 

kind of the nemesis 

for us this year. 



Paul Petty 

Antioch baseball coach 



their runs in the fifth inning 
and that was enough for the 
victory. 

Despite no fielding errors 
for the night, Petty said his 
team's defense was not com- 
pletely flawless in the game. 
"We just made some little 
mistakes, but that's been kind 
of the nemesis for us this 
year," Petty said. "It's just 
those little things and we're a 
team that just cannot make 
those [mistakes]. But* it 
worked out 

tonight." 

Such 
was the story 
for the Eagles 
as Lakes had 
decent 
defense with 
two errors in 
the game, 
good pitching 
with just six 
hits, but little 
offense with 
just one run 
off of one 
hit. 

"Dan Riedel has been a 
reliever for us in the past, but 
he started for us today and I 
thought he did a great job." 
Tschappat said. "He pitched 
out of some big jams early 
and Matt Limbert came in 
and pitched well, but we just 
need to make plays behind 
them." 

Antioch now stands at 8-12 
on the season and 2-4 in the 
NSC-Prairie while Lakes 
drops under .500 at 9-10 over- 
all, but is still amongst the 
top in the Prairie with a 5-2 
conference record. 



99 



. «.. »• « ,. 



- "V\\ % *„■*. <->V 



», »'vv«S,>-vi-<. «' 



» . .- v - •# «* 



Page 12B • April 27, 2007 ALL 



SPORTS 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumalsxom 



»HometownSports 

CLC foundation hosts golf 
outing to benefit scholarships 

Teo up for the College of 
Lake County Foundation 2007 
Joan Legat Memorial Golf 
Outing, to be held on Monday, 
June 11 at Glen Flora Country 
Club in Waukegan. Proceeds 
from the event wili benefit the 
Foundation's scholarship fund, 
which helps deserving CLC 
students reach their educa- 
tional goals. In 2006, the golf 
outing raised $32,000 for CLC 
student scholarships. 

Glen Flora Country Club, 



established in 1911, is a private 
18-hole golf course known for 
its well kept greens. 
Registration for the golf outing 
begins at 10 a.m., followed by 
lunch at 11 a.m. and a shotgun 
start at 12:30 p.m. During the 
18-hole "scramble" tourna- 
ment, golfers will have the 
chance to win prizes, including 
a new vehicle, provided by 
Liberty Auto City. 
After the tournament, the 
event will continue at 5 p.m. 
with cocktails, hors d'oeuvres 
and a silent auction, as golfers 



and guests are entertained by 
the music of Jazz Beaucoup, 
led by Bruce Mack, CLC direc- 
tor of bands emeritus. One of 
Glen Flora's famous dinner buf- 
fets will be served at 6 p.m., 
followed by the presentation 
of prizes and awards. 
Donations are $350 per per- 
son and proceeds will go to 
the CLC scholarship fund. 
Tickets to attend the evening 
reception only are $50. 

For more information and 
registration, call (847) 543- 
2400. 



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Chris Padgett ■ cp.idgelta nwntw5group.com 

Alex Marginean, of Grant, returns the ball while playing a tennis match against Wauconda. 

May the best Bulldog win 

Grant first singles player tears through Wauconda 



♦ 



By STEVE PETERSON 

speterson@nwne wsg roup.com 

FOX LAKE - It's a good 
time to be a Grant tennis fan. 

The Grant High boys ten- 
nis team, led by No. 1 singles 
player junior Alex 
Marginean, continues to have 
a stellar season in the North 
Suburban Conference Prairie 
Division. The Grant team 
shutout Wauconda 5-0 last 
week and also beat Antioch, 4- 
1. 

As for the singles star, 
Marginean won 6-1, 6-3 at first 
singles over Wauconda. Thus 
far, he has only lost to Antioch 
this season and according to 
Grant Coach Kristin 
Chamberlain, he has no intent 
on slowing down. 

Chamberlain said he has been 
able to put together such an 
impressive season thanks to a 
hard regimen of work in the 
offseason last summer. 

"For the most part, he is 
able to hold it together," 
Chamberlain said. "You can 
tell that he has grown a lot as 
a tennis player. He continued 
to work over the summer." 

While Marginean has put 
together a nice 2007 campaign, 
Grant's Coach said there is 
more work to do for the rest of 
the team. Chamberlain said 
that her team is inexperi- 
enced in the details of the 
game, but is very athletic and 




Chris Padgett - epatIgett(3nwnew$group.com 

Connor Dimick, of Wauconda, returns the ball while playing doubles 
with Ryan Shepherd during a tennis match against Grant. 



gaining in their knowledge. 

Grant might be one of the 
top teams in the Prairie, but 
Chamberlain more than 
respects the NSC-Lake part of 
the equation. 

"The other side of the con- 
ference is so tough, with ' 
Warren and Lake Forest," 
Chamberlain said. 

Against Wauconda on 
April 19, Grant had No. 2 sin- 
gles -player- Clay Guenther 
win, as did No. 1 doubles team 
of seniors Tommy Sircher 
and Danny Deligio. The No. 2 
doubles team of Andrew 
Kovarik and Jay Hendricks 
won with consistency. Josh 
White and Joe Loris combo is 



the No. 3 doubles team, which 
won a close match. 

Thanks to the wins from 
Marginean, Guenther and the 
rest of the Grant Bulldog ros- 
ter, Grant was able to claim a 
5-0 sweep over NSC-Prairie 
rival Wauconda. The efforts 
improved the team to 5-3 over- 
all after the win over 
Wauconda. 

Against Antioch, Sircher 
and Deligio won in doubles, as- 
did Hendricks and Kovarik. 
Loris and White won a three- 
set match. 

On the horizon, Grant 
hosts Marian Central on April 
26 in a nonconference 
matchup. 



Warren Wave 12U Silver start season 



The Warren Wave 12U 
Silver team opened its 2007 
summer season by competing 
in the Pontiac Invitational 
Tournament in Pontiac, 111. 
this past weekend. The Warren 
Wave is the travel portion of 
Warren Township Girls 
Softball, historically opens its 



season in Pontiac and was one 
of 19 teams from central and 
southern Illinois to compete in 
the tournament. The team 
played in a three-game round 
robin tourney and won all 
three games. 

In game one, the Wave 
played against the Bureau 



BURNING GAS 
TO SAVE on ATM FEES? 



National City loom 



County Blaze. Jessica Demski 
dominated striking out seven 
and only allowing two hits in a 
6-0 shut-out. Catcher Sam 
Belletini was solid and called a 
great game behind the plate. 
Speedy shortstop Ashlen 
Powles hit a big triple. Kelly 
Majewski contributed with a 
big RBI. Great defensive plays 
were turned in by third base- 
man Kayte Gravel and second 
baseman Kelli Layton to end 
the game. 

In game two against the 
Odell Storm, both Arielle 
Rivera and Selaina Corronado 
took the mound and battled 
hard. The Wave was trailing 7-3 
going into the last at bat, 
Patience at the plate paid off as 
Rebecca Kouba, Powles, Layton 
and Demski all scored to tie the 
game. Gravel slid into home 
with the go ahead run sealing 
the 8-7 victory for the Wave. 

Game Three was a pitching 
gem by lefty Amy Ricci giving 
up only one walk and one hit in 
a 5-1 victory over Central 
Illinois Girls Softball Rebels. 
Blair Feldman provided the 
offensive spark with a line 
drive shot to left center. The 
Wave defense was solid as 
Taylor Boyke snagged a tough 
line-drive while playing first 
and Kouba made play after play 
at second base including a key 
grab of a ball up the middle. 
Catcher Rivera made a diving 
catch in foul territory to end 
the game. 

"Our girls played great, we 
still have much work to do to 
get ready for the meat of our 
season, but we are on our way," 
coach Denis Gravel said. "We 
should be in great shape." 

The 12U Silver team is 
coached by Coach Lou 
Bellitini, Carol Demski, Bill 
Majewski, Jerry Powles and 
Craig Ricci. 









* 



£ 



i 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournals.com 



SPORTS 



ALL April 27, 2007* Page 13B 



»Girls Soccer: Crystal Lake Central 3, Grayslake North 

Crystal Lake Central girls 
heavy-hearted 'heroes' 

Knights honor (alien opponent by moving game to Crystal Lake 



By JOE STEVENSON 

jstc venson @nwne wsg roup.com 

CRYSTAL LAKE 
Normally, starting a soccer 
game with no goalkeeper 
would seem like a bad idea. 

At Crystal Lake Central on 
Monday, it was perfectly 
appropriate. 

The Tigers kicked off their 
girls soccer game against 
Grayslake North with 10 play- 
ers on the field as a tribute to 
keeper Jenna Gleixncr, a jun- 
ior who died in a car accident 
Saturday afternoon near Volo. 
As the Knights got the ball, 
they kicked it out of bounds, 
allowing Central to have pos- 
session. 

At that moment, Tigers 
keeper Sam Johnson took the 
place of her best friend in goal 
and the subdued-but-large 
crowd cheered. 

The outcome, a 3-0 Central 
victory in the Fox Valley 
Conference Fox Division 
match, seemed insignificant, 
yet still remarkable. 

"The girls, today, are 
heroes," a sobbing Central 
Coach Joe Schroeder said. "To 
step on this Field and do what 
they did ... they're incredible 
young ladies. As was Jenna. 
She wasn't liked, she was 
loved. All the people who 
showed up today shows what 
Jenna did for a lot of people. 
She was a special, special 
girl." 

Gleixner, 16, also played 
volleyball and basketball for 
the Tigers' varsity teams. She 
was driving with three team- 
mates on her travel basketball 
team Saturday afternoon, on 
their way to a game in 
Kenosha, Wis., when the acci- 
dent occurred. 

Johnsburg junior Sarah 
Kelly, 17, also died in the 
crash. Prairie Ridge junior 
Emily Murphy and Central 
junior Jenna Olson survived. 

Central (7-1-3 overall, 4-0 



©6 

The girls shared a lot of 

feelings and thoughts 

[Sunday]. They decided 

Jenna would really want 

us to play. That's what it 

came down to. We're all 

hurting, and we had to 

put that hurt aside. 



Joe Schroeder 

Crystal Lake Central 
girls soccer coach 



(iJQ 



FVC Fox) made it easy on 
Johnson in goal, although she 
received an ovation the few 
times she touched the ball. 

The players met at 
Schroeder's home Sunday and 
voted to play the game 
Monday. Grayslake North 
accommodated the Tigers by 
agreeing to move the game to 
Central. 

"I really wasn't sure how 
we were going to come out " 
Central defender Sara 
Kasparian said. "I was pretty 
emotional. As a captain, I had 
to be. strong for everyone. 
Everything's going to be for 
[Gleixner]. There's not going 
to be any goals back in that net 
as long as ... our hearts are out 
there for her." 

Forward Kristen Benson 
said the team vote to play was 
nearly unanimous. 

"There were two who 
understandably didn't want 
to, and we understood and 
respected that," Benson said. 
"They were here. At first, it 
was really hard because I did- 
n't hear anyone say anything. 
It was really quiet. It was hard 
to look back and not see 
Jenna. I mean, I think we got 
through it." 

Jackie Gleixner, Jenna's 



mother, sat with the team on 
the bench during the entire 
game. Jackie is a math 
teacher at Central and the 
freshman soccer coach. After 
the game, tears flowed freely 
as each player tossed an 
orange carnation on the 
ground behind the north 
goal. Jackie then joined the 
players in a large circle for a 
few silent minutes. 

"I wasn't sure [Jackie] was 
going to be able to make it 
through," Schroeder said. 
"She couldn't leave." 

A group of Central stu- 
dents showed up wearing 
white T-shirts with "One 
Love" on the front and 
"Gleixner 1" on the back. 
North's players stood and 
applauded the Tigers before 
the postgame handshakes. 
After that, Central students 
formed a tunnel for the play- 
ers to run through like they 
did after youth soccer games. 
The Tigers admitted their 
friend was on their minds 
almost every time they 
touched the ball, not that they 
would have wanted it any 
other way 

"She's not here with us, but 
she really is [here] above," 
Kasparian said. "We're going 
to keep playing for her." 

Schroeder, his coaching 
staff and the fans stood and 
watched the emotional scene 
after the game. Players' sobs 
could be heard at midfield. 

"The girls shared a lot of 
feelings and thoughts 
[Sunday]," Schroeder said. 
"They decided Jenna would 
really want us to play. That's 
what it came down to. We're 
all hurting, and we had to put 
that hurt aside. 

"It's one thing to say you 
want to do that and another to 
actually be able to do that. It 
was tough. We had Jenna look- 
ing down, smiling. I'm sure 
she's proud of them for doing 
that." 



»Views 



Slammin' Sammy seems to 
have a distorted memory 




CHICAGO- Sammy Sosa 
looked at a questioner on 
April 17 and insisted with a 
straight face he never had 
been booed. 

Never? 

"No," said Sosa, dressed in 
Texas Ranger blue. "Not yet." 

Too bad there's a first time 
for everything. A second, 
third and fourth, too. Each 
time Sosa stopped to the plate 
during the Rangers' 8-1 win 
against the White Sox, lie 
was met with a strong chorus 
of boos from the U.S. Cellular 
crowd. 

Can you believe the gall of 
some people? 

Sosa was making his tri- 
umphant return to Chicago 
for the first time since bolt- 
ing the Cubs clubhouse on 
the last day of 2004 and 23,139 
unruly White Sox fans had to 
ruin it! 

Couldn't they see the 
greatness in his 2-for-4 effort, 
which included a three-run 
home run (Ills 591st) off Mike 
MacDougal in the eighth 
inning? 

Where was the love for the 
reappearance of the mini- 
kisses and heart taps directed 
toward the end-of-the-dugout 
camera? 

"It's part of the game. It's 
going to happen," Sosa later 
said of the discouraging wel- 
come. "If they feel like that, 
it's OK with me." 

It's fun to try and visit the 
world Sosa currently inhab- 
its. 

You know, the one in 
which he's still the biggest 
star in the baseball universe, 
despite batting .205 in his 
first 11 games. 

The one where Sosa thinks 
he still has as many fans as 
when he chased Roger Maris' 
record with Mark McGwire 
in 1998? 

"In my mind, yes, I believe 
[that]," Sosa said of the con- 
tinuing popularity he per- 
ceives to have. "Now, I am not 
in every person's mind to 
find that out." 




Kevin 
Kaduk 



How convenient. 

"We saved baseball in 
1998," Sosa went on to con- 
tend. "We did the best wo can 
and everyone was happy but 
after that, 1 had no control 
over what happened." 

Look, don't view this as a 
slam on Slammin 1 Sammy 
here. 

After all, he reported to 
spring training after a year 
in exile and made the 
Rangers when many, includ- 
ing myself, didn't think he 
had a chance. 

Still, it's fascinating that 
he's able to insist he remains 
a fan favorite and that his 
image hasn't been tarnished 
at all. 

In Sosa's world, out-of- 
town fans never threw cork 
at his feet in 2003, Chicago 
nearly shut down when lie 
was traded to Baltimore in 
2005 and the country under- 
stood why he clammed up 
before Congress the same' 
year. 

It's a nice little tool, this 
revisionist history. 

"Definitely there was a 
misunderstanding [with the 
Cubs] in 2004, but time will 
heal everything," said Sosa 
when asked if he'll ever be 
welcomed back on the North 
Side. "I had a good conversa- 
tion with John McDonough 
in spring training. We spoke 
a little bit. I want to come 
back to Chicago and when 
I'm ready to do that, they're 
going to open the door for 
me." 

Of course, it's no surprise 
that Sox fans roundly booed 
Sosa on April 17. South 
Siders were just doing their 
job against a man who was a 
rival for many years. 



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But whether or not Cubs 
fans will welcome him back 
remains up in the air. 

Just how many Cubs con- 
vent Ions will pass before he's 
a sought-after autograph sub- 
ject? What about before lie 
throws out a first pitch at 
Wriglcy? 

Then there's the Hall of 
Fame, which roundly rejected 
McGwire in his first year of 
eligibility. 

Will reaching 600 homers 
this season make any differ- 
ence for the man who fin- 
ished second in '9B but sits 
under the same suspicion of 
steroid use? 

When you consider the 
uncertainty Sosa faces after a 
decade of being idolized, the 
stubborn stance he main- 
tains makes a little more 
sense. 

Would there be any way to 
succeed in this comeback if 
he felt otherwise? 

After the game, Sosa found 
himself in familiar territory. 

Reporters and cameras 
■ crowded around his locker. 
Questions about the belt-high 
fastball he belted into the 
stands were asked. 

For his part, Sosa played 
the role of humble con- 
queror, the side that used to 
be seen when he played for 
the Cubs, believe it or not. 

Though if you thought it 
was possible for Sosa to keep 
his inner superstar bottled 
up for more than 5 minutes, 
you walked away disappoint- 
ed. 

After spotting the reporter 
who asked the pregame ques- 
tions about getting booed, 
Sosa suggested the question- 
er should now feel sorry and 
shamed. 

"I've got 591 of them," he 
said. 

As if he would let anyone 
forget. 

». Kevin Kaduk is a 
NorthWest News Group sports 
columnist. Write him at 
kkaduk@nwnewsgroup.com.. . . 



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Page 14B • April 27, 2007 ALL 



SEQUEL 



Uke County Journals / LakeCountyJoumais.com 



CI 
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♦ . 

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■ Rnco: Aaron's 499 

■ Where: Talladega (Ala.) Suporspecd- 
way (2,666 miles), 188 laps/501.208 
miles. 

■ When: Sunday, April 29 

■ Last year's winner: Jlmmic Johnson 

■ qualifying record; Bill Elliott, Ford, 
212.809 mph, April 30, 1987. 

■ Rnco rocord: Mark Martin, Ford, 
188.354 mph, May 10, 1997. 

■ Last week: Eventually. Jeff Gordon 
wins everywhere. Gordon, after doing 
everything but win during the season's 
first seven races, trimmed Phoenix In- 
ternational Raceway from the list of 
tracks where he's never won. Now only 
Texas Motor Speedway and Homestead 
Miami remain, ripe for Gordon's picking 



By winning the Subway Fresh Fit 500, 
Gordon hiked his season points lead 
and tied Dale Earnhardt for sixth place 
on NASCAR's all-time list of race win- 
ners. Ho could moke the most signifi- 
cant pass of his career next week nt 
Talladega Superspeedway, long an Earn 
liardt family stronghold, by claiming ca- 
reer victory No. 77. Of Earnhardt. Gor- 
don said, "To oven come'close to any- 
thing he ever did Is qulto an honor.for 
me." On lap 300, Gordon assumed con 
trol, leaving Tony Stewart to finish sec- 
ond. Late-rallying Denny Hamlin, Stew- 
art's teammate, plucked third place 
away from Matt Kensoth, who eventual- 
ly fell to fifth. Jlmmic Johnson was 
fourth. 



«W i lll-M-F,l:l,IN.-WI 

■ Race; Aaron's 312 

■ Whoro: Talladega (Ala.) Su- 
perspeedway (2,666 miles), 
117 laps/311.922 miles. 

■ When: Saturday, April 28 

■ Last year's wlnnor: Martin 
Truox Jr. 

■ Qualifying record: Joe Ne- 
mechek, Chevrolet, 193.517 
mph, April 24, 1997. 

■ Rnco record: Mark Martin, 
Ford, 168.937 mph, April 26, 
1997. 

■ Last week: Clint Bowyer, in a 
Chevrolet, outdueled Ford's 
Matt Kenseth at Phoenix Inter- 
national Raceway. 



■ Race: O'Reilly Auto Parts 
250 

■ Where: Kansas Speedway, 
Kansas City, Kan. (1.5 miles), 
167 laps/250.5 miles. 

■ When: Saturday, April 28 

■ Last year's winner: Terry 
Cook 

■ Qualifying rocord: BUI Lester, 
Toyota. 173.833 mph, July 1, 
2005. 

■ Race rocord: Ricky Hendrlck, 
Chevrolet, 125.094 mph, July 
7,2001. 

■ Last race: Toyota driver Mike 
Skinner won his third consecu- 
tive race, dominating the 
Kroger 250 at Martinsville 
Speedway. 



TAtLMJEGATJATA 





Distance:.,,. , 2.66 mile oval 

Length of frontstretch: 4,300 ft 

Length of backstrotch: 4,000 ft. 

Mllos/Laps:„„.500 ml. - 188 laps 




33" 

[tanking In 
turns 1-4 



Wjj 



cassstaanagasngBpi 



Nextel Cup 

1. Jerf Gordon 1,326 

2. Jeff Burton * 74 

3. Malt Kenseth - 160 

4. Jimmie Johnson • 211 

5. Denny Hamlin - 242 

6. Kyle Busch - 324 

7. Tony Stewart - 332 

8. Carl Edwards - 359 

9. Clint Bowyer - 363 

10. Mark Martin - 405 



Busch Series 

1. Carl Edwards 

2. Dave Blaney 

3. Kevin Harvlck 

4. Matt Kensoth 

5. David Reutimann 

6. Kyle Busch 

7. Mike Wallace 

8. Marcos Ambrose* 

9. Bobby Hamilton Jr. 

10. Denny Hamlin 



Craftsman Truck Series 

1,525 1. Mike Skinner 745 

- 424 2. Todd Bodlne - 94 
• 449 3. Rick Crawford • 143 

- 477 4. Ron Hornaday Jr. - 144 

- 491 5. Ted Musgrave - 145 

- 555 6. Jack Sprague - 181 
-600 7. MlkeCrafton -196 

- 604 8. Johnny Benson - 202 

- 605 9. Travis Kvapll - 216 
-608 10. Aaron Flke* -248 

♦ rookie 



^AND-WHO'S-NGT-' 



► Who's hot — 
Jeff Gordon's fin- 
ished .fourth or 
belter six limes In 

eight races. ... 
Jlmmle Johnson's 
been fourth or bet- 
ter five times. 

► Who's not — 
Kasey Kahne has- 
n't finished In the 
lop 10 since Day- 
tona. ... The high- 
est-ranked Dodge 
driver, Kurt Busch, 
Is 13th in the sea- 
son standings. 




Sadler touched by the 
massacre at Virginia Tech 



John CInrk/NASCAR This Week 




Sadler 



By Monte Dutton 
NASCAR This Week 

AVONDALE, Ariz. — No 
NASCAR driver has been more 
touched by the Virginia Tech 
tragedy than Elliott Sadler, the 
Emporia, Va. ( 
native who has 
family and per- 
sonal connec- 
tions with the 
Qlacksburg 
school. 

"I was on the 
West Coast here... 
trying to catch as 
much as I could From the news. I was 
with my mom and dad on the 
phone checking in as we found out 
people we knew were OK," Sadler 
said. 

"If you've ever been to Blacks- 
burg, you just don't see this hap- 
pening at that place. Monday 
was a very, very tough day for 
everybody that was part of the 
Hokie Nation." 

Another Virginian, Ward Bur- 
ton, made plans to visit Virginia 
Tech on Monday after returning 
home from Phoenix. 



II mm, that's odd — On 

April 17, Michael Waltrip an- 
nounced he had promoted 
Buddy Sisco to crew chief of his 
No. 55 NAPA Auto Parts Toyota. 
The move didn't get much no- 



tice, particularly after Waltrip 
failed to make the field for the 
Subway Fresh Fit 500, his sev- 
enth consecutive failure. 

Then, however, Waltrip was 
asked about the rumor that he 
was going to replace himself as 
driver with Bill Elliott. Absolute- 
ly not, he replied. Presumably, 
one of the appeals of hiring El- 
liott would be the fact that the 
1968 Winston Cup champion is 
eligible for ex-champion's provi- 
sionals. One of the two other 
drivers at Michael Waltrip Rac- 
ing is Dale Jarrett, who has run 
through five of the allotted six 
slots in that category. 

Among Waltrip's comments: "I 
know my focus is sharp on race 
day..." 

How could he possibly know 
that? 



Quite the test — Phoenix of- 
fered a new challenge for the 
COT: speed. 

The previous races were held 
on short tracks of roughly a half- 
mile. Aerodynamics makes little 
difference on such tracks. Though 
Phoenix International Raceway is 
relatively flat, it's a mile long and 
has an unusual shape. The back 
straight is curved, almost as if 
there were three turns on one 



side of the track. 

"The biggest thing is actually 
racing at a track where aerody- 
namics matter," said Kyle Petty. 
"It's as important, or more im- 
portant, than mechanical grip is 
at Phoenix. ... We don't have a 
test or anything like that. 

"It's time to actually see what 
we have." 



datlUBiiaJilA WrfdM 




Gordon 



Stewart 



Jeff Gordon vs. Tony 

Stewart 

Losing to Gordon at Phoenix ob- 
viously got under Stewart's skin. 
He left the track without speaking 
to radio and TV or attending the 
supposedly mandatory post-race 
press conference. Stewart could 
use a victory to relieve the self-ap- 
plied pressure. 

NASCAR This Week's Monte 
Dutton gives his take: "Stewart al- 
ways complains about having a mi- 
crophone stuck In his face after he 
climbs out of his car, but he could 
have taken time to cool down be- 
fore conducting the runner-up's 
press conference. Instead, Tony 
opted to, In his own words, 'beat 
the traffic' " 




Wisconsin's first robotic-assisted surgery for 

endometrial cancer 



At Aurora Health Care/ patients with endometrial cancer have the advantage 
of several minimally invasive treatment options, including robotic-assisted 
surgery. Aurora is a leader in the use of this advanced procedure and 
performed the very first robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery in Wisconsin. 
Robotic-assisted surgery is extremely precise, involves less trauma to the 
patient and less risk of infection. The result is shorter hospital stays and a 
more rapid return to everyday activities. 



Aurora Health Care 



Auntr.t SI Luke's Medical Center 
AuruM Women's Pov/illinn 

www.ALiroro.orcj/Cyn 



Make the call. Get a second opinion 



(xperls s.iy Unit SO. 0(11} 
wild < .in< er would <|rl ,i 
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V 






<e County Journals/ LakeCountyJournals.com 



SPORTS 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page 15B 











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Page 16B * April 27, 2007 ALL 



SPORTS 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJournats.com 



CI 
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»BoysRoundup 



Grant edges Lakes, 3-2, in tight tennis meet 



BOYS TENNIS 

With the North Suburban 
Conference Prairie Division 
season In full swing, Grant 
and Lakes linked it out last 
Tuesday to the tune of a 3-2 
Bulldog win. 

Grant first singles player 
Alex Marglnean started things 
out right with a 3-6, 60, 60 win 
against Andrew Yopp. In sec- 
ond singles, Grant's Bulldogs 
struck again, this time as Clay 
Guenthor overpowered 

Randall Haylock in straight 
sets, 6-3, 6-4. 

Lakes was finally able to 
get some wins in the doubles 



arena as first duo of Charlie 
Scupham and Justin Shea won 
over Grant's Tommy Sircher 
and Danny Dellglo. Scupham 
and Shea's victory came in 
straight sets with a score of 6- 
2, 6-1. 

The Eagles also got a big 
win out of the second doubles 
team of John Dudley and 
Tlmmy David. David and 
Dudley got the win over 
Andrew Kovark and Jay 
Hendricks, 6-4, 6-3. 

Despite the losses in the 
two top doubles divisions, 
Grant was able to score the 
final blow as Joe Laris and 
Josh White defeated Nathan 



David and Andre Skula in a 
very close match. Laris and 
White scored the 6-7, 7-5, 7-5 
win to close out the meet and 
capture the Prairie Division 
win for the Bulldogs. 

"This was a fiercely con- 
tested match that came down 
to the wire," Lakes coach 
Bryan Plinske said in a press 
release. "Nathan [David] and 
Andre (Skula] could not have 
played any harder [but] Grant 
just had a little more consis- 
tency in their shots." 

Antioch 5, Round Lake 

Antioch's Sequoits thor- 
oughly dominated Round Lake 



in an NSC-Prairie match-up, 
winning all matches in 
straight sets for the easy 50 
victory. Amongst the victors 
was first singles player Brett 
McKenzie, who won 6-2, 6-2 
and second singles player 
Dylan Haley was also victori- 
ous, winning 60, 6-0 in the con- 
test. 

Johnsburg 4, Grayslake 
Central 3 

As the Fox Valley 
Conference Fox Division 
rivals lined up last Tuesday, 
both coaches knew it would 
be a fight and the meet did not 
disappoint as Johnsburg 



edged Grayslake Central 4-3. 

Grayslake's Jon Yee struck 
the first blow in No. 1 singles 
as he rebounded from a 6-2 
first sot loss to get 60, 6-2 
wins. However, Johnburg's 
Dan Martin answered back by 
winning 6-2, 6-1 over Brad 
Meadows. Grayslake senior 
Roy Pienar also got the final 
singles win in the No. 3 ranks 
by beating Chris Goulet in 
straight sets, 7-6, 6-2 . 

In doubles, it was more of 
the same as Johnsburg won in 
first doubles, third doubles 
and the extra match, but 
Grayslake's No. 2 duo of Tom 
Lettenmair and Brian 



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Dingman won over Matt 
Heinz and Jason Krueger, 7-5, 
6-1 to round out the meet, 

BASEBALL 

Grant 9, Antioch 2 

Grant High baseball play- 
ers knew the importance of 
the North Suburban 
Conference Prairie Division 
game with Antioch when they 
faced a crucial late-game situ- 
ation. 

Grant scored four runs in 
the sixth inning and ended up 
winning 9-2. 

"They knew that we had to 
have that game, We have two 
losses in the division, and 
trail Vernon Hills. Had we 
lost, that would have shot our 
chances at a NSC Prairie 
Division title," Grant coach 
Mike Mizwicki said, 

Senior Anthony 

Kaskadden went 3-for-3 with 
two doubles and 3 runs 
scored. Senior Jacob Cobb 
had two hits and an RBI. 

But it was senior Eric 
Peterson whose two-run sin- 
gle gave the Bulldogs some 
breathing room with a 5-1 
lead. 

Peterson is a designated 
hitter for Grant, as he shares 
catching duty time with jun- 
ior Gerik Wallsten, 

"He is an all-around good 
kid. It is hard to catch every 
day, they even need time off in 
the majors. They are both hit- 
ting over .400," Mizwicki said. 

Sophomore Ryan Thorsen 
kept the Sequoits guessing. 
"He was in control the whole 
game. He allowed one run in 
seven innings. We play every- 
day this week, so his effort 
was huge," Mizwicki said. 

Grayslake Central 7, 
Johnsburg 1 

Grayslake's Rams exploded 
offensively for 11 hits that led 
to an easy 7-1 Fox Volley 
Conference Fox Division vic- 
tory over Johnsburg last 
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SEQRIS. 



ALL April 27, 2007 • Page 17B 



»OutdoorExperience 



Bass Pro Shops a 
trip worth taking 



With gas hovering just 
less than $3 a gallon, I try to 
use it expeditiously. There Is, 
though, one trip I am glad I 
took recently. 

Bass Pro Shops is in the 
midst of a tremendous 
expansion stage. Every 
angler worth his or her salt 
has been a visitor to the big 
store in the Gurnee Mills 
Mall complex, Earlier this 
year, the company opened a 
new facility in Portage, Ind, 
Yet they saved the best for 
last with the new sports- 
man's palace that opens this 
week in Bolingbrook. 

Bolingbrook? Yes, that is 
a bit of a hike, but it is 
worth the ride to take a look 
at this combination megas- 
tore and outdoors museum. 
Bolingbrook is a heck of a 
lot closer than the Bass Pro 
flagship store in Springfield, 
Mo., which is the state's No. 
1 tourist attraction, drawing 
more than 4 million annual 
visitors. The Bolingbrook 
store is at the Boughton 
Road exit on 1-355. 

This facility is a mon- 
strous 140,000-plus square 
feet, even larger than 
Gurnee. The sales floor is 1 
1/2 stories tall. By this I 
mean that the second floor 
covers only half of the main 
floor, giving the store a wide- 
open, expansive feel. In 
terms of merchandise, they 
have everything that you 
would expect to find: fishing 
gear, guns and hunting sup- 
plies, watersports gear, boats 
and motors and marine sup- 
plies, camping gear and 
plenty of outdoor clothing. 
This store also has some- 
thing new to the chain, they 
have a complete trail bike 
department. 

I really liked the optics 
department, which featured 
a spotting scope counter 
where outdoors enthusiasts 
can sample the various prod- 
ucts, viewing the full width 
of the store, I also was 
impressed withthe. full-serv- 




Steve 
Sarley 



Walking through the 
departments, customers will 
be challenged to find all the 
display items as they have 
them virtually everywhere. 
Above the merchandise are 
displays of all sorts of 
antique fishing tackle and 
hunting gear. Below the 
counters are lighted displays 
of memorabilia. 

The highlight of any Bass 
Pro Shop is usually a giant 
aquarium. Bolingbrook's 
contains 18,000 gallons of 
freshwater and holds most of 
Illinois' top species. In addi- 
tion, there is a 13,000-gallon 
saltwater tank in the store's 
restaurant and even a 7,000- 
gallon canyon pool filled 
with trout. 

In addition to the tour, I 
got to watch Bolingbrook's 
mayor, Roger Claar, put the 
ceremonial first bass into 
the big tank. 

The store also includes a 
restaurant called the 
Islamorada Fish Company. 

This mammoth store 
opens at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday 
for a ribbon-cutting and 
"Conservation Night." Fifty 
cents of every dollar spent at 
the opener will be donated to 
the National Wildlife 
Federation's "More Fish" 
campaign, which works to 
save fish and fish habitat for 
future generations. Many 
local conservation groups 
will man booths at the open- 
er. 

Outdoors celebrities such 
as Pete Maina, John 
Gillespie, Brenda Valentine 
and Jimmy Houston will be 
joined by Bears Hall of 
Famer Gale Sayers and 
NASCAR driver Martin 
Truex Jr. on opening night. 



Lacrosse popularity making 
its way to the Midwest 



ice fly shop and the' indoor 
archery range. 

Also in the facility, there 
is more than $3 million 
worth of taxidermy. They've , 
got at least one of * every ani- 
mal you'll find in our state 
and many species are repre- 
sented by a large number of, 
mounts. More than 3,500 
area artifacts are on display, 
as well. 



'Lake County Journals 
outdoors columnist Steve 
Sarley's radio show, "The 
Outdoors Experience, " airs , 
live from 8 to.9 a.m. on 
Saturdays on AM-560. Sarley 
also runs a Web site for out- 
doors enthusiasts, 
OExperience.com. He can be 
reached by e-mail at 
steve@oexperiende.com. 




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Complete and send to; 

) LAKE COUNTY 
J 



OURNALS 

Your life Connected. 



Lake County Journals Golf, 2007 
EO\Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 
600390250 or fox: 847-22 JS810 



By PAUL JOHNSON 

pjohnson@nwncwsgroup.com 

When Phil Ryan was 
growing up on Long Island, 
it was either baseball or 
lacrosse when It came to 
spring sports. 

"We didn't know growing 
up that lacrosse wasn't 
played everywhere," said 
Ryan, vice president of the 
Chicago Shamrox profession- 
al indoor lacrosse team. "It 
wasn't until I started getting 
recruited for college that I 
noticed that." 

Lacrosse traditionally is 
known as an East Coast 
sport, but its popularity is 
exploding across the 
Midwest, much like soccer 
did more than 20 years ago. 

When Ryan came to 
Illinois after playing lacrosse 
in college in Maryland 16 
years ago, there were only 
eight high schools that had 
lacrosse as a club sport. 

Now, 49 schools offer boys 
lacrosse arid 37 offer girls 
lacrosse as an emerging 
IHSA sport, with dozens of 
others on that same path, 
including some in and 
around McHenry County. 

"All of a sudden five years 
ago we started seeing a rapid 
increase," said Ryan, who 
also is part-owner of 
Lacrosse America, an organi- 
zation that hosts youth clin- 
ics and leagues. "We've dou- 
bled the amount of kids that 
are out. It's steamrolled Into 
tons of schools jumping on 
and offering youth pro- 
grams." - 

It's already here 

Among Pox Valley 
Conference schools, only 
Grayslake Central's boys 
team has filed for emerging 
sport status. But a Crystal 
Lake team consisting of 
players from Central and 
South, and teams from Cary- 
,.G.rQy.e.andvErairie Ridge,,^,_ 
have formed in the past two 
years, operating as club 
sports. 

At C-G, a group of 17 boys 
approached New York state 
transplant Brendan Gorman 
about starting a program. By 
the end of the summer, . 
Gorman was coaching 42 
players. Now, there are 89 in 
the program. 

"The kids are so enthusi- 
astic about it," Gorman said. 
"There is a strong group of 
athletes around here, which 
is nice. They're great athletes 
and they want to pick up the 
sport. I've never seen any- 
thing like it. It's amazing 
how far they have come in 
less than a year." 

The three teams operate 
in the eight-team Northwest 
Suburban Lacrosse League, 
filled with other teams that 
have yet to apply for emerg- 
ing sport status, so there is a 
competitive league in place if 



that eventually takes place. 
; "This will satisfy us for 
this year," Crystal Lake 
coach Jim Sisto said. "Next 
year, I would like the players 
to get recognized by the 
school and get varsity letters 
like the hockey [club] team 
does. We're going to push 
really hard and work on get- 
ting that." 

Crystal Lake Central prin- 
cipal Steve Olson is keeping 
track of interest at the four 
District 155 schools. Because 
the clubs were started so 
recently and interest is 
increasing quickly, lacrosse 
might become an option in 
the near future at all of the 
district schools. 

"Never say never," Olson 
said. "It's just one of those 
things as we grow and inter- 
est increases, that's some- 
thing I could see taking 
place. We look at how to best 
meet the needs of kids. 
There have been some con- 
versations." 

Lacrosse and the IHSA 

The programs that are 
recognized by the IHSA as an 
emerging sport are members 
of the Illinois High School 
Lacrosse Association. 
According to the IHSA, that 
means the 



IHSA "tracks 
participation 
in inter- 
scholastic 
sports that 
are spon- 
sored by 
IHSA mem- 
ber schools, 
but in which 
the IHSA 
does not con- 
duct a state 
series;" 

In addi- 
tion to 
lacrosse, 
sports such 
as ice hockey,- 
.rowing^, :■>. 



« 

The state needs to see a 

certain level of 

participation before 

they'll take over the 

administration of the 

sport It gives the' IHSA 

an idea of how many 

teams are participating. 

Josh Cole 

Member of Chicago Machine 
outdoor lacrosse team 



lacrosse team, Cole also is an 
experienced high school 
coach. "It gives the IHSA an 
idea of how many teams are 
participating. It's a certifi- 
cate of authenticity, so to 
speak." 

New Trier has been at the 
forefront of the IHSA move- 
ment. On Jan. 10, New Trier 
athletic'director Jim Bloch 
and others from the IHSLA 
gave a presentation to the 
IHSA board, citing 49 schools 
fielding boys lacrosse teams 
and 37 fielding girls lacrosse 
programs. That is not includ- 
ing schools that currently 
operate as club teams. 

"It's a matter of numbers 
and wanting to get the num- 
bers up across the board," 
New Trier assistant athletic 
director Paul Moretta said. 
"The IHSA is looking for 
between 70 and 80 schools 
that offer either boys or girls 
lacrosse, about 10 percent of 
their membership. That's 
kind of their general demar- 
cation." 

Other obstacles to over- 
come if it becomes an IHSA- 
sanctioned sport are 
increased money needed for 
coaches and extra field space 
needed for practice and 
games. Schools do have the 
option of 

forcing kids 

who want to 
play the 
sport to pay 
their own 
Way. 
• "It's 
about eco- 
nomics," 
Moretta said. 
"It's hard to 
find the 
resources 
and the 
green space. 
But it is a 
hugely grow- 
ing sport. 



y<- r. ma**ism«Jtr 



.^yA/» 



rugby, com- 
petitive dance, competitive 
drill team, competitive pom- 
pons and field hockey also 
have been granted emerging', -pointed out by Moretta is the 
sport status. Schools that ' [ fact Champaign Centennial 
sign off oh the measure are' is the only team in the 



The odds are 

that it will be 
an IHSA sport in the, next 
few years." 

Another potential pitfall 



not required to provide 
funds, just to make sure 
IHSA guidelines are fol- 
lowed. 

The IHSLA runs its league 
to IHSA standards with the 
hope that eventually it will 
be able to make an easy tran- 
sition to becoming an IHSA- 
sanctioned sport, complete 
with a state playoff series. 
That is why it only allows 
teams that apply for emerg- 
ing sport status to partici- 
pate in its league. 

"The state needs : to see a 
certain level of participation 
before they'll take over the 
administration of the sport," 
said Josh Cole of the 
Chicago Machine outdoor 



IHSLA south of the Chicago 
area. The IHSA has been sen- 
sitive to the issue of state- 
wide participation in the 
past. 

Obvious appeal 

Lacrosse would seem to be 
a perfect sport in America, 
which loves fierce action and 
high scoring. Lacrosse offers 
both of those dynamics and 
even some of the contact of 
football and hockey, to boot'. 

"It's seen as a trendy 
sport," Cole said. "There's 
definitely an appeal to high- . 
school level kids; It's more 
up-tempo than baseball. The 
fast-paced nature is appeal- 
ing. It seems like once you 




get people into lacrosse, 
they're hooked. There's no 
wading in. People dive feet- 
first once they get a hold of 
the sport." 

Lacrosse's popularity in 
the Chicago area has 
increased to the point there 
are outdoor apd indoor pro- 
fessional teams operating In 
the market. 

The Chicago Machine out- 
door team played last year at 
Benedictine University in 
Lisle, but this spring it will 
share Toyota Park with the : 
Chicago Fire of Major 
League Soccer. 

The Shamrox indoor team 
just wrapped up its first sea- 
son at the new Sears Centre 
in Hoffman Estates, averag- 
ing more than 6,000 fans a 
game. In 2006, the National 
Lacrosse League topped 1 
million fans for the first time 
in its 20-year history. 

"Even if you did this five 
years ago, it still wasn't 
ready," Ryan said of the 
Chicago market. "I think the 
timing is right now. It's real- 
ly on the upswing. You don't 
have to explain what lacrosse 
is quite as often." 

Starting young 

Ryan and co-owner Rich 
Martin started Lacrosse 
America 16 years ago with 
an indoor youth program in 
Highland Park. Once a repu- 
tation was attained, pro- 
grams began to sprout at 
park districts across the 
Chicago area. 

"Lacrosse America has 
been all about spreading the 
game around the area," Ryan 
said. "You need to build it 
with the youth. That's where 
your fan base is." 

Cole is seeing those youth 
programs build. That is only 
going to make the high 
school programs stronger 
and increase lacrosse's 
foothold in the area. 

<~+-i*rE very^yea t*-we add-more — | 
high school teams," said 
Cole,- who also coaches at 
Lake'.Zurich, "Right now 
there are more youth-level 
kids in grades three through J 

■ eight that are playing in 
Illinois than high-school par- ' 
ticipants. It will get even big- * 
gen" ,.. . -3 

Both the Shamrox and * 
Machine hold regular clinics 
across the area to bolster 

, awareness of the sport. The 
Machine conducted a clinic 
at Lippold Park in Crystal 
Lake last Sunday and the 
Shamrox let the Cary-Grove 
and Prairie Ridge boys team 
play each other at the Sears 
Centre before the Shamrox's 
season finale last Saturday. 
The common comparison 
between the current lacrosse , 
boom is with the soccer 
boom of the early 1980s. 

"It's just like girls soccer I 
20 years ago," Moretta said. J 
"People wondered how many I 
people would play it, how it : 
would succeed. Could you ; 
imagine not having that J 
sport now? This sport is not { 

.going any where." . {* 



•Paul Johnson is a sports- 
writer for the North West 
News Group, Write to him at 
pjohnson@nwnewsgroup.com 



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Page 18B • April 27, 2007 ALL 



SM& 



Lake County Journals / LakeCountyJoumals.com 



»Girls Track: Wauconda Invitational 



Leaping toward victory 

Grant lives up to its billing with big invitational win 



By STEVE PETERSON 

spotcrson@nwncwsgroup.com 

WAUCONDA - Grant 
Htgh's girls track team hopes 
to show the rest of the state 
that last year's fourth place 
finish in the state meet is 
what can he expected of 
these Bulldogs for years to 
come, 4 

Grant Coach Jim Cramer 
said that the team is hitting 
its collective stride, heading 
into the Lake County meet on 
April 26 in Fox Lake, followed 
by North Suburban 
Conference, sectional and 
state meets. 

In the nine-team 
Wauconda Invitational, 
Grant beat runner-up Carmel 
by a 160-1015 score. 

After Grant and Carmel, 
the drop-off was big, as 
Deerfield finished third with 
79.3 points and Wauconda 
and Vernon Hills rounded 
out the top five with 63.5 and 
60,3 points, respectively. 

"We're feeling pretty good. 
We would like to win county 
this year. Warren, Zion- 
Benton, Lake Zurich and 
Lake Forest could be chal- 
lengers. We've stayed unbeat- 
en for seven straight years in 
the Prairie Division," 
Cramer said. "Lake Forest 
has won the meet for several 
years in a row. They always 
seem to 4 edge us out. 
Hopefully, we can get over the 
hump." 

As for the hosts, 
Wauconda seemed unable 
match the depth of Grant or 




Chris Padgett - cpadgetltffnwncAsgroup.com 

01a Yussuf, of Grant, sprints alongside Wauconda's Felicia Osier in the 
100m dash finals during the Wauconda Invitational Track Meet. 



Carmel, but Wauconda fin- 
ished fourth in the meet. 

"I think our relays had 
more depth. All four placed 
and we were able to match 
point-for-point with them," 
Wauconda Coach Al Willhoit 
said of edging Vernon Hills. 
"We could not stay with 
Grant in the relays, they are 
at another level." 

The 400 and 800 relays 
both showed improvement, 
Willhoit said. 

Amanda Zacharkiewicz, 
Anne Robbin, Dani Connor 
and Felicia Osier ran the 



4x200. In the 4x100, Courtney 
Kimes, Robbin, Ashley 
Collier and Ossler ran. 

Willhoit said he was 
happy with the top two finish 
of Lauren Serum (17.3) and 
Kimes (17.6) in the hurdles. 

"Kimes is a junior and 
they both push each other," 
Willhoit said. "Kimes should 
start to work on the three 
step, which is different from 
the four step, so she may be 
slower at first. But she will 
work on it in practice." 

Sam'antha Michelau 

(3,200), Wauconda's distance 




Lauren Serum and Courtney Kimes, of Wauconda, compete in the 
Wauconda Invitational Track Meet. 



Chris Padgett ■ cpndcjetl Jnwnewsgroup.com 

final for the 400m hurdles at the 



runner, gave a solid effort 
with a third. 

But for the top teams, 
Grant set the standard. Grant 
will host the girls county 
meet on April 26, and the 
team appears ready for a late- 
season push back to EIU and 
the state meet. 

Grant standout Bailey 
Wagner set meet records in 
the shot put and discus. 
Wagner had a 45-7 effort to 
win the shot and a 143-11 i/4 
effort to win the discus. 

Sophomore Kendra 

Kennedy won the 800 with a 
2:22.30. 

Ola Yussuff won two 



events, the 100 in 13.3 and the 
200 in 27.10 and also placed 
second in the high jump. 

Round Lake senior 
Miranda Daily won the high 
jump competition, giving the 
Panthers their best finish of 
the night. 

Camel's Megan Fowler 
won the triple jump with a 29- 
7 1/2 heave, and was second 
in the long jump. 

Carmel's Claire Bitto took 
third in the discus with a Hi- 
ll 1/2, and Bonnie Micelli in 
the 400, Hilary Halford in the 
800 and Allison Thumel in 
the long jump fared well. 

The Carmel 1,600 relay of 



Top contenders 



Wauconda Invitational Top Five 

1. Grant, 160 points 

2. Carmel, 104.5 points 

3. Deerfield, 79.3 points 

4. Wauconda, 63.5 points ; 

5. Vernon Hills, 60.3 points 

■ ■ ; , 

Micelli, Thumel, Halford and 
Shannon Howell took second. 1 

Wauconda, 2-4 in dual, 
meets, will be at Woodstock's 
meet April 27. 

Willhoit said that meet is 
good because it gives the 
team a different look than the 
county opponents. 



Grayslake Central, North football teams to compete in 'Tug of Pride' 



Grayslake Central and Grayslake 
North football teams will have 
another score to settle as the two 
teams will be competing in a "Tug of 



Pride" tug*of-war competition prior Football League will conduct a "Tug their home games. champion. The winners .get their 

to the Chicago Rush's home game at of Pride" tug-of*war competition for Winners from each week are name engraved on a traveling tro- 

7 p.m. on Monday, May 7. local high school football teams dur- invited back during the final home phy that is displayed at their school 

The Chicago Rush Arena ing pre-game festivities for each of game to determine the Tug of Pride for the year. 






- 



NATIONAL 



MINIVAN SALE 

NO EXTRA CHARGE DVD PLAYER 




/, 



"See complete inventory with lull descriptions, 



FROM 1500 TO 12000 



.^^^ace complete inventory wim mil Descriptions, i i 1 ■ , 1 j , j l j j ^m ,m ,i r^r -/ , i I i l a *M\ 

Inbrior/exleria photos S Carfax history on all p/e-dfiven vehicles^ \\ ! I iH 'Til I 4-Tv'l 'J Kll'l | J j I KBS , 




AMEH jmHPMES.TpjooucTs fc 



fflf mvm niB 



FIN ANCE 

WSmmSL 



FIVE-STAR 




HIGHEST GOVERNMENT" 
FRONT AND SIDE CRASH RATING 

• Air Conditioning 

• Automatic Transmission 
, ■. . , i • Power Windows 

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• Tilt Steering Wheel 

• CD Player 

• Black 

• Pre-drlven #5212 



P^ $ 12.900 




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BUY FOR $16,286 




BUYF0R s 1T5O1 




HIGHEST GOVERNMENT 
FRONTAL CRASH TEST RATING 
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• Value Group 

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• 40/2O/4O 

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• #70170 



If 23 **^^?- 



ORIGINAL MSRP: *20J73 

> Automatic Transmission 

• Air Conditioning " 

> Chill Zone storage biri 

• Keyless Entry KTiV ( *H 

■ PowerLocks IT. r .U \, JT,i,i 

■ AM/FM CO/MP3 9Uili^M 
■ #80002 



s 179i 



BUY FOR s 18.010 



55' 



BUY FOR s 19.975 



i Mileage nasal on Highway 'includes all discounts: plus taxes, utie. license ana DOC Ice. MSRP may noi reflect actual selling prtcfc^PaymenLs Hcured at 6.9% for 75 months. You must qualify with approved credit 






QUALITY PRE-DRIVENS ASK US ABOUT BRAND SPANKIN' USED 



$^qSjQ'00 DODGE RAMQ-CAB 4X4$. 



79 GMC 7000 SERIES 

Stak3-body. white. Ilk* nawl #491 9N .. T C7v7l/V8, blue. Loaded; Low milas! #545211 

*01 DODGE NEON $ O Oj;/Y04 PONTIAC GRANDPRIXGT $ 

BIlh, Fast a Furlousl #5468U..,......; '.'O ^^l/Marqqn. shrf.Jljadj.up #5394N... ..^ 



'02 

Black 



12, 
12, 
12, 

DODGE NEON SXT ""$'JZ Q C fi '06 DODGE STRATUS $ * O 

Apad3dl#J5472N. i .„.. i .. ; . iJ&\JU Biua/Loadadl OntyJ5kl #5448, „_.,. . I £., 

12, 
13, 



•91 MAZDA MIATA CONVERT. { $ MZ Q ff*/Y03 JEEP LIBERTY, LMTD $ 

Hardtop, whlta. 75k. Uk3 new! «5473N....r.w^^4/P/89n/4x4 i L9alh3r#540BU;V. 



tl only . 
'97 DODGE RAM 2500 4X4 S7OC/l'05 CHEVY MA LIB U MAXX LS $ 

Plow lnclud3dlJ*5470U....„.„^..,...., : .... ...... -^ A^pt/ Silver. V6. Only 30kmlla3#5219N 



*04 DODGE NEON SXT $ OQC/l '06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA '-'$ 

Sllv6r.'moanroof#5360N.. -Oil vJl/Blua. Only 27k mllesl #5402U.vf.'.... ■> 

'04 PONTIAC VIBE . $ QQ^iTJ '02 MITSUBISHI MONTERO XLS$ 

Gray, Loaded! A5375N .,.,..: &.29%J %J Silver, 4x4. 3.5L. 3ln. Iirtl #5448U... ' 

'03 FORD EXPLORER XLT $<*H QIT/) '05 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB $ 
Blue, 4x41 #5426N -• * * f.!&\J\J.Va Powarl #5413N..,;; ,...../., 



QJtAW DODGE RAM 2500 SLT $ 

*7%?C/Dl9S9l 4x4 with plow! #5407N 

*7 Cfl '05 PONTIAC G6 .' .. $ 

</, */l/Only'12k'mll93l Full Pwrl #5433N;. - 
OC/T04 FORD RANGER CLUB CAB XLT$ 
' Z?\J\r 4x4, 'Silver. 6cyl. only 28k #5500N. 
QtZn '° 5 CHRY PT CRUISER CONVT GT$ 
iJiJU White. leather, loaded! #5397N....;.;: 
Q Crk 03 FORD F1 50 XLT EX-CAB 4X4$ 

i7i/l/,V8, Loadedl Only 43kl #5144N 

O fZn '06 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVT $ 

£.\J\J Loaded with Leather! #5406....' ; 

Q IT/V02 CHEVY TAHOE4DR 4X4 $ 

+7.%}%/ Black, Low mll«! #5400N,. .;...: . 

Q Rn '04 DODGE DURANGO LMTD $ 
aW'Mnrf, DVD. GPS. Llhr#5441N... i .... J 



AC GRAND PRIX GTP$*f Q QC/l] 
inrjyvv ween, unr. mnrf, Only 20k! #5464N f C^» %7%JW\ 
^fiir Qit/l'OeBUICK RENDEZVOUS CXT$ f Q QCA 
i *r 9 ,%J%J\J Silver. '3rd Row. 3.5V6.15k#5449N B Zfj<7\jU\ 



4 A OC/l 06 PONTIAC 
1 *T±& 3V Green, llhr, 



i-Tivvv Oliver, jra now, 3,&vt>.i&Kff544aN w u* %s%*u- 
*f VO^/I '06 DODGE RAM 4X4 HEM! $4 Q Q Cfk 
l:.*Jj &%J %J 20"s, Only 1 5k miles! Red #5340U, I %7 • Z7%J%J 
-*"* ^'" >> '05HONDACRVEX4WD ■*-*--*-*■—-* 



<it( Q Kfi }05 HONDA CRV EX 4WD $ O 4 ' Q Rfl 

l,\J 9 &*J\J Black, snrf, cd/cass. 18k#5484N..; fc I * %7%J%J 
i 7 K K /l; ( 07.JEEP'6R CHEROKEE LAREDO '$ 0*f 7 Q Cfk 
■■iO'*£^i*^- 4x4 ' S,lvar |-On!yiBk miles! #5309. A. I m&OU 
17 Q*%H 06 JEEP COMMANDER 4X4 $04 QCrt 

f /• &%}\J While and Loaded! #5351..... ...A I . Z?QU 

*f> f QftV ° 6 CHRYSLER 300 TOURING $ *} *J KKH 

§j im C7UL/ Gold; Low miles! #5445.:..;. £.£., OOU , 

1R Q1CI '° 6 Honda ridgeunertl 4X4 $ *r £? nr/) 

I U,i7%J\J Blk, Ithr, mnrf. htd sts, 20k #5495N. £• Om&QUl 



Q5 LUBE, OIL & FILTER CHANGE 
^tav ANY DODGE. CHRYSLER OR JEEP 
-i- 1 MA CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 



WELCOME All DODGE, CHRYSLER, JEEP OWNER AND SERVICE CUSTOMERS 



experience M W^SS M^SS^JSS ^S&lSS^ Ii Mondav-Fridav 7:30-5:30 Saturday 8:30-1:00 

>-5TAK jj£.KVIL.b, QHT^liitg.lluidle^&lrmtcomfJCnertfinsoectlcn^^ Mocor oil and filter. Offer expires 04/31. Bring ad' Not valid with oUterj olfa •' 



105 Rt. 173 

Antioch, BL 

1p3U 'it aCwacft tavc mow at yarn {licndCcf Vodyc Stoic, . . GET TOP DOLLAR 00(9 /a 09 IOC/a 

DODGE f ANTIOCH ffSftVSSSS 8l ^3E"l M 



IL 



NO GIMMICKS. JUST DEALS. 

Visit us on the web www.dodgeofnntioch.com 



Sales: Mon-Fri 9-9; Sat 9-5 



55 



i 



i 



JLAKECOUNTV 
OURNALS 



Friday, April 27, 2007 



*<£***. 





BIRDING - 

ENHANCING YOUR 

BACKYARD 

EXPERIENCE 

Page C2 



:;■*«* 



t'VfS 



. \>y' 



Photo Provided 



Sarah Underwood, 11, of Round Lake Beach, donated her hair to Locks 'o Love on April 7 at A Matter 
of Style in Grayslake. Underwood is a student at William L Thompson School in Lake Vitla. 



SEVEN STEPS TO A 
DE-CLUTTERED HOME Page C3 



DO YOU HAVE ANY PHOTOS 
YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE? 

Send your local photos lo: 

L.iKel.-vnd Journnls, 30 S, Whitney St.. Gr.iysl.ikc, II 60030 or cni.nl to 

psniollanvvncwsgroup.com. And we will print them right here on this p.itje. 



Real Estate 

Classified 

Wheels 



Page C2 

Page C4 

Page C9 



LOOKING FOR A 
NEW JOB? 

CHECK OUT THIS 
WEEK'S CLASSIFIED 
SECTION FOR THAT 
NEW OPPORTUNITY 

r 

Inside 



Ready to buy a home? Don't forget title insurance 



The National Association 
of Realtors projects that 6.4 
million resale home sales 
will take place this year. If 
you are one of those home- 
buyers, you're keenly aware 
that this will likely be your 
largest single investment. 

Many will purchase home- 
owner's insurance to guard 
against forces such as fire, 
theft or wind damage. But 
what about other, hidden 
hazards that may threaten 
their financial investment? 

Unlike homeowner's 
insurance, which focuses on 
future events and charges an 
annual premium, title insur- 
ance charges a one-time pre- 
mium and safeguards 
against loss from hazards 
already existing in the title. 

The two basic kinds of 
title insurance are lender, or 



mortgagee, protection and 
owner's coverage. Most 
lenders require the former as 
security for their invest- 
ment. Owner's title insur- 
ance lasts as long as you, the 
policyholder, or your heirs, 
have an interest in the 
insured property. 

Insuring a home's title 
begins with a search of pub- 
lic land records. 

The title agent, or attor- 
ney working on behalf of the 
title underwriter, examines 
documents, such as deeds, 
wills or trusts, to determine 
whether the property is 
insurable. 

When title problems are 
found, they are corrected, 
whenever possible, to avoid 
future claims. According to a 
recent survey by the 
American Land Title 



Association (ALTA), title 
problems consistently arise 
in 36 percent, or more than 
one out of every three, real 
estate transactions. 

After search and examina- 
tion, title problems may still 
be hidden or missed, such as 
a signature forged on a deed, 
or an unknown heir might 
step forward to claim owner- 
ship. 

In each of these cases, a 
title, insurance policy will 
offer financial protection 
(subject to the policy's terms 
and conditions). The title 
insurer defends the title and 
"perfects" the title or pays 
valid claims. 

With title insurance, you 
have financial protection 
against covered title hazards 
for your most important 
investment. 






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Because a home is often your single biggest financial investment, it pays to protect it with title insurance. 



0% forS 5 

on selected models 



06 Chrysler Pacifica Touring 





RYS UER 



CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY MINIVAN SALE! 



06 Jeep Grand Cherokee 




NEW! 07 Chrysler 300 




#4034 





© s 318/ 



mo.* 



06 Chrysler Sebring Convertible GTC 



Leather 
Loaded 




#2647 



ONLY 





t 



wj^m 



NEW! 07 Jeep Compass 




O '299/ 



mo.* 



06 Jeep Commander 



Power Windows, Locks Doors & Seats 
l^. Rear back Up Sensor . 




#2652 



oniv $ 21;987 



NO CREDIT/BAD CREDIT.. .1-800-770-6582...WE CAN GET THE CAR YOU WANT! 



04 Hyundai Ela ntra -^ 

Power Windows, Locks, ' ™" 
Mirrors, Sldo Air Bags 

*l45/mo. 




02 Chryiler 300 Ml «m«i 

*1 2,987 




06 Ford Fuilon » 268 ° toodca-Biacn 

*269/md. 




05 POfllllC G6 *277B Leather -Loaded 

H 5.987 



00 Grand Cherokee mbm 

4x4 • Sunmo! 



J 8,995 




02 BMW 3251 «aw 

4 Door Sedan 

$ 229/mo. 




06 Honda Civic ««s Loaded 



250/mo 







05 GMC Envoy XL m?6 

$ 1 8,999 



03 Wrangler «c? 3 

,987 




05 Lincoln Navig ator *2m 

loaded ' \jLLoJ. l\i<i® ? 



52.987 






tJtfMttec^--., K-.^-S*' 



04 Volkswagen Jettaj^fs 

s 17,987 




03 BMW 5301 «sw 



99 GMC Sierra «eee 

$ 



>8,999 




03 Chevy Millbu »688 

s i49/mo 



• -vj a i : 




03 Alt. ma '«8w|«w 

$ l99/mo. 




01 Pontine Grand Am '^ 

1 ' ' '.■ 

$ i49/mo 



01 Chevy Impala «ws 



, 



$ 



5,987 




04 Dodge Stratu s SXT •'new 

*142/mo. 






04, Fo>d Mustan g GT 40th Ann. 

»2613 



s 299/mo. 




03 Dodge Gran d Caravan Sport 

02615 




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C2 * April 27,2007 



MLiSIM 



UkeCoUntyJournals.com 




Some 

Ponds 

are worth 

jumping 

into! 




of Genoa City 



■-,.',: '•■-■ 




At The Ponds of Genoa City, not 
X*. only do you have eight striking 
townhome designs to choose from, 
but you'll also have convenient access 
to major expressways, putting you 
just minutes from the year-round 
recreation of Lake Geneva. 

O Eight Decorated Models 
O 9'ceilings 
O Central air 
O Basements* 

O Stylish lofts* 

O Sizeable walk-in closets 

O Professional landscaping 

O Just across the border 
Easy Illinois Access! 



from the mid 




1=* 



262-279-6100 

1-94 north to Rte. 173, west to Rtc. 12, north to 

South St., right to Williams St., left to Sales Office. 

www.pondsofgenoacityxom 



"Per plan 



Birding — Enhancing 
your backyard experience 



In today's highly interac- 
tive and short attention-span 
society the backyard increas- 
ingly beckons to us as that 
accessible personal space in 
which to repair from life. And 
life has become increasingly 
defined as the flickering space 
of a television, computer 
screen, personal digital assis- 
tant or smartphone. 

Obviously these ever-pres- 
ent devices are easy to take 
anywhere, even our back- 
yards. But taking them there 
is one thing. To disengage is 
to realize the natural interac- 
tivity all around, just waiting 
to enliven our "backyard 
experience." 

Also, momentarily forget 
the other entertaining ele- 
ments for backyard enjoy- 
ment to be open to the one of 
the most entertaining, sooth- 
ing and natural of backyard 
activities — birding. 

The allure of birding can 
be found anywhere in a range 
from infrequent to dedicated 
pursuit, with your backyard 
serving as the stage. No mat- 
ter how you decorate or 
"accessorize" your personal 
outdoors, keep in mind you're 
doing it to create a haven for 
birds. 

So what are the building 
blocks for enlivening your 
outdoor stage to attract the lit- 
tle winged actors? 

Trees and shrubs 

For birds, trees and shrubs 
are elements of security with- 
in your yard. The types and 
densities of your trees and 
shrubs have a direct bearing 
on the amount and types of 
birds that visit your yard. For 
example, just planting shrubs 
in groups rather than a line 
and not closely pruned afford 
covered ground access attrac- 
tive to colorful robins, blue 
jays and cardinals. Single 
plantings or groupings of 
pine and fir trees provide 
yearlong insulation, cover 
and nesting perches. Without 
,a doubt, tree and, shrub. type 
and arrangement are integral 
to optimum backyard bird 




No matter how you decorate or 
"accessorize" your personal out- 
doors, keep in mind you're doing 
tt to create a haven for birds. 

activity. Visit www.howtoat- 
tractbirds.com to learn more. 

Wildflowers 

Wildfiowers are natural 
magnets for attracting birds. 
They require minimum main- 
tenance once the initial plant- 
ing is complete. Not pruning 
or "deadheading" blooms is 
best for attracting birds 
through their remaining seed 
pods. 

Birdhouses 

Whether you build it your- 
self or buy a birdhouse, you'll 
find that putting up any house 
will gain residents. For cer- 
tain types of birds, follow spe- 
cific birdhouse structures. 

Details such as floor area, 
house depth and rise of entry 
hole above the floor, are a few 
dimensions that make a house 
more conducive to specific 
bird types. Knowing the type 
of birds desired should guide 
your birdhouse choice. 

Birdfeeders 

Feeders come in general 
types: tube feeders, wall feed- 
ers, hopper feeders, sock feed- 



ers, suet feeders, tray or plat- 
form feeders, lantern feeders 
and variations on all of these. 

A tube feeder with a tray 
attracts cardinals; crossbills, 
finches and sparrows while a 
suet feeder attracts woodpeck- 
ers, chickadees, nuthatches 
and wrens. Feeders near the 
house call for a window feeder 
while an open area requires a 
tube feeder mounted on a pole. 
And then there are add-ons. 

The most common are 
squirrel deterrents such as 
baffles or cones. Go to the 
National Wildlife Federation's 
site at www.enature.com or 
the U.S. Fish & Wildlife 
Service Web site at 
www.fws.gov/birds for com- 
plete sources for feeder infor- 
mation. 

Bird food 

If you put the right food 
out, the birds will come. In 
fact, bird food is the most 
affordable and effective bird- 
ing lure. Whether sunflower, 
safflower, white millet, 
cracked corn or thistle seeds, 
knowing which seed your 
favorite bird likes guides your 
bird seed purchase. Buying 
higher-quality mixes versus 
mixes with fillers can ensure 
complete consumption, as 
well as minimize ground or 
patio debris from uneaten 
fillers. Filler debris attracts 
unwanted rodents under feed- 
ers or near your home. 
Knowing the bird you want to 
attract, the quality of seed 
used and the ease-of-use in the 
packaging are the ABC's of an 
enjoyable birding experience, 

The limited time we have 
to relax in the great outdoors 
can also be the height of 
entertainment from a natural 
perspective. Putting in place 
the basic building blocks for 
attracting color and activity 
to our yards is easier than you 
think. First is recognizing 
what has always been in our 
midst and with just a few 
additions, realize that some of 
the best stimulation available 
isn't always in front of a mon- 
itor. Enjoy! 



N 







JAKE COUNTY 






NALS JOURNAL 

■/ ■■: ■?■-. . : .'-f^J'v,;v'--v>. :: v, r V '■',-■;■'■'. •:■■■■ ■■- ;'#;j#j 

Reach 57,O0© homes : each week by'. placing, -ybur:ad-'j 

For more Information; call 

KristyTimmons 847-223-8161, x118 






,;:!<;;: sk 




HAINESVILLE 



$244,900 



'■".■' 




NOTASTAIRINSIGHTl 

Immaculate 3 BR 2 BA ranch, Brick facing, large deck, 
master btli, VL ceiling liv rm, neutral colors, good closet 
space, Graysiake schools! 
RICK OSCHMANN .(847)508-2516 

* ^ftrtC m — .. Ca ll. 



SPRING GROVE 



$279,000 




mm 



CHAIN O'LAKES WATERFRONT 

High & Dry 2 BR 1 .5 BA Ranch w/FR & Office Area. LR 
w/FP & Skylites. 4 Season Rm w/Cath Ceil. HW Fir. 
Beaut Water Views. Wooded Lot. Patio & Gar 
"MR PETE" EIGHLER (847)395-230 



•ATERFFfONT., 



SALEM, Wl 



$179,900 




LOTSOFUPDATESI 

Own this 3 br ranch with lots ol charm. Stainless sled appli- 
ances, 2 full bains. Gorgeous extra-large wooded lot can be 
used lo expand living space and/or enjoy a nice private yard. 
JIM NEWCOMB (347) 274-5966 



Ozntui)^ 



American 
Dream 





Linda Mortensen 

(847)587-8200x107 

lmortinsin.llllnolipropBrty.com 



^RB^MBKgrand 



727 Grand, Ingleside • (847) 587-8200 x137 

Each office independently owned and operated Office licensed in IL/WI 




<*?5Et 




INGLESIDE - $173,900 
Two Bedroom, One Bath. Great Home with 
many upgrades lo offer. Updulcd Kitchen & 
Bath. 2nd Floor Bonus Room/O fflcc/Dcn/BR 
Fenced Rear Yurd (50 x 220t),Bascmcnt with 
cxl access. Long Luke water rights. 
Great Value I 

Call Linda Mortensen 
847-587-8200 ext.1 07 




INGLESIDE - NEW CONSTRUCTION 
$264,900 

Ready to move in soon) Three Bedroom, 2-1/2 
Baths. Living Room & Large cat-in kitchen, 
Guest Ball) & Laundry on 1st floor. 2nd Floor Master 
Suite incl w/I closet & private full bath. Two add! bed- 
rooms + Full Bath. Unf Basement - Alt 2 car garage. 
Water its to Chain o'Lakes, Agent owner. 
Call Linda Mortensen 
647-587-8200 ext.107 




FOX LAKE -$249,900 

Great House + Extra Buildnblc Lot! Three 

Bedroom, One Bath Ranch, with step down LR 

with fireplace. Mud/Laundry Room. Detached 

2+ heated garage. BONUS: Extra Buildablc lot 

included. Call for more info. 



Call Linda Mortensen 
847-587-8200 ext.107 




INGLESIDE -$260,000 

Built with quality old world craftsmanship 
Three Bedrooms, Two Full Baths. Large Living 
Room + LL Family Room w/fp. Many new win- 
dows, carpet & hardwood flooring. Eat-in Kitchen. 
Fenced rear yard with above ground pool. Attached 
2 car garage - Cul-de-sac location. 

Call Linda Mortensen 
847-587-8200 ext.107 



U-H 



^ n " 



&;m i 



i 



FOX LAKE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 

Four Two Bedroom, 1-1/2 Bath Townhouses 

in same building. Currently rented - great 

opportunity! 

5425,000 



Call Linda Mortensen 
847-587-8200 ext.107 




FOX LAKE TOWNHOUSE • $185,900 

Spacious Rcva Bay 1st Floor Unit offers Two 

: Bedrooms, Two Baths & plenty of upgrades 

Two cur garage with storage loft. 

Great Condition & just steps away from 

Rcva Bay Marino. 

Call Linda Mortensen 

847-587-8200 ext.107 






FOX LAKE NEW CONSTRUCTION 
$267,900 

Three Bedroom, Two Bath Ranch with English 

Basement, Be the first to own this beautiful 

home featuring vaulted ceilings, fireplace. 

Lovely Master Suite Alt 2 Car Garage. 

Cull for showing appointment 

Call Linda Mortensen 

847-587-8200 ext.107 






FOX LAKE -$219,900 

Light & Bright Hillside Ranch on cul-de-sac. 
Three Bedrooms, Two Baths, Large Living 
Room with fireplace. Hugs finished walkout' 
lower level with family room & steps out to 

patio. All 2-1/2 car garage. Close to Fox Lake & 

Public Transportation, Call before it's gonct 

Call Linda Mortensen 

847-587-8200 ext.107 



INGLESIDE - $167,500 

Ready lo move in and enjoy? Three Bedroom, 

One Bath ranch style with many upgrades & 

updates doncl Spacious Living Room & Eat in 

Kitchen, Generous sized lot for relaxing. > 

Low taxes make this that more appealing! 

Call Linda Mortensen 
847-587-8200 ext.107 



INGLESIDE - $139,900 • WHAT A DEAL! 

Roll up your sleeves und get lo work and you'll 

add immediate value lo this home) Four 

Bedrooms, One Bath. Much of the work has j 

been done or started, and the seller is leaving 

new windows for you to install. 2-1/2 car 

garage. Build your equity nowt 

Call Linda Mortensen 

847-587-8200 ext.107 



UkeCoumtyJournals.com 



MLiSffiDI 



April 27, 2007 • Page C3 



Seven steps to a de-cluttered home 



For many people, having 
nn abundance of personal 
items serves as a security 
blanket. For others, It's a sign 
or prestige: The more stuff I 
have, the better I am. The 
trouble is, too many belong- 
ings can quickly turn an 
orderly home into one over- 
run with clutter. 

Perhaps you've heard of 
the recent news story where a 
man had more than 70,000 
empty beer cans filling his 
residence, so much so that the 
landlord could barely enter 
the building, Others horde 
newspapers, knick-knacks, 
books, sock collections - you 
name it. What items have 
taken over your home? 

The good news is that it 
only takes a little determina- 
tion and a few supplies to cut 
down on clutter. 

1. Getting started: The 
hardest part about clearing 
out clutter is getting up the 
gumption to start. The entire 
process can be less over- 
whelming if you tackle one 
small project at a time: for 
example, one closet, drawer or 
cabinet. As you build up 
expertise and momentum, 
you can move on to bigger and 
better de-clutter-fests. 

Choose an area that needs 
attention and assess the situa- 
tion. Set a reasonable time- 
frame to complete the task - 
say, a few hours. Now it's time 
to get your supplies. 

2. Supplies: Those home- 
organizing shows on TV are a 
great source of ideas. Most * 
instruct homeowners to form 
three separate piles: trash, 
keep and donate/sell. 
Depending upon the size of 
the items you're organizing, 
you can use three baskets, 
boxes or bags for the purpose 
of. sorting. Also bring in a 
beverage to keep you hydrated 
and a small snack to boost 




and put lliem back into your 
closet or cabinet. 

7. Plan your next project: 
Now that you've successfully 
de-cluttered one area of the 
home, set goals for others. 
Remember, if the items are 
collecting dust or socked away 
in a closet, they should be 
thrown away, sokl or donated. 



All Floors; 



your energy levels while 
cleaning. A radio tuned to 
your favorite music can help 
keep you in an upbeat spirit 
and moving along on your 
task. 

Stock up on organizational 
containers that can be used to 
hold the belongings you will 
be keeping. There are plenty 
of options at neighborhood 
stores or specialty shops. 

You may also want to arm 
yourself with a vacuum, 
duster, broom and bug spray. 
You never know what you 
might uncover! 

3. Limit distractions: Plan 
your de-cluttering session for 
a time when you can devote 
your undivided attention to 
the task at hand. Don't plan it 
close to an appointment, 
mealtime or when the kids 
can get in the way (unless 
you're recruiting them to 
help). Also, make sure you are 
well-fed prior to starting, so 
you won't be tempted to pro- 
crastinate any further. 

To further limit distrac- 
tions, turn off the ringers of 
your phones and crank that 
music so you won't hear the 
doorbell ring. Make sure the 
dog is walked and the cat has 
been fed, then begin, 

4. Full swing ahead: Start 
by emptying everything out of 
the cleaning space so you can 
see just what is lurking 



inside. Once all items have 
once again seen the light of 
day, begin the sorting process. 
Any items that are visibly 
beyond repair should be 
immediately trashed. If you 
haven't worn or used some- 
thing in a year or two, you can 
also throw it out or put it in 
the donate pile. Keep only the 
items that you will truly use, 
and be extremely reasonable 
about deciding which items 
are keepers. Hoarding too 
much stuff is what got you 
in this situation to begin 
with, so there's no point in 
just putting everything back 
without removing a chunk of 
stuff. 

5. Remove the trash and 
donations: Pack up the items 
that wUl be leaving the house. 
Put the trash at the curb and 
place the items for donation 
in your car. Anything that can 
be sold at a garage sale should 
be marked as such. Plan to 
host a garage sale as soon as 
possible to rid yourself of the 
remaining items. Out of sight, 
out of mind is key - further 
reducing the temptation to 
keep things you don't need. 

6. Clean the keepers: 
Anything that is being kept 
should be cleaned (if neces- 
sary) and put back in an 
orderly fashion. Group like 
items together (such as vases 
with vases, bowls with bowls) 



If you haven't used them, you 
don't need them. 

Advantages to conquering 
clutter: Taking the time to de- 
clutter your home can offei* 
you a liberating and "in con- 
trol" feeling over your space, 
In addition, if you're deciding 
on selling your house, a home 
free of clutter makes the 



home appear more spacious 
and inviting to potential buy- 
ers. 

Depending upon the size of 
your space, try to de-clutter 
anywhere from annually to 
monthly. On the flip side, be 
wise about purchases, so 
you're not compounding the 
problem by adding to clutter. 




r 



Tiger Wood 

'8.99 . 

Installed 



This is just a sample of all the hardwood on salei lifetime warranty on all labor.- 



Oak & Maple 

$ 5.99 Sf 

Instilled 400 SFMIn. 



White Mountain Birch' 

M/4-+ 3-1/4" » 3/4' 

*679sf 

Instilled 



Chestnut J Brazilian Cherry I Country Maple 

4"l3/4"iolliJ I-TM"»3/4" 2.1/4" ♦ 3-1/4* 1 3/4" 

7.99 SF 7.99 sf j 6.69sf 

Instilled 400 SF Hin. . > liutilWlflOSf Uin. > . Instated 400 SF Ilia.... i 



^tp&GSSSSRSS 




Kitchen Cabinets 
& Countertops 



)uarl7, • "Granite* • r'oimirn • SkiNU 
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847-245-799 1 • www.valuefloor.nef 

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Shop al home 7 days por we*le • Call for appointment 



All installations done by our own oxper 
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OFF Any Order] 

m!h minimum purchase- o( St ,500 

Value Floors, Countertops & Cabinets | 
Llndenhurst • 847-245-7991 



Kissing keys 
goodbye: New 
lock technology 

.... *w^4V 

Homeowners finally have a 
way to unlock the eternal prob- 
lem of forgetting {or losing) 
one's keys or locking oneself 
out of the house. 

It's estimated that millions of 
keys are lost each year in the 
U.S. and, short of calling a lock- 
smith or waiting for a family 
member to come home, there's 
not much to do when you find 
yourself in such a position. But 
biometric technology is chang- 
ing all mat, giving homeowners 
a way to open the front door 
with just a swipe of the finger. 

The new BioLock— from 
Sequiam Biometrics and 
Weiser, a Black and Decker 
Company— features a simplistic 
design that on the outside 
resembles traditional deadbolt 
door locks. However, the biomet- 
ric deadbolt lock features a bat- 
tery-powered locking mecha- 
nism that is activated when the 
homeowners swipe their finger 
across AuthenTec's FingerLoc 
fingerprint sensor— eliminat- 
ing the need for traditional keys. 

Homeowners can enroll up 
to 50 family members, friends or 
other individuals to activate the 
lock, which has an easy-to-use 
instructional keypad on the part 
of the lock that is inside the 
home. Homeowners can also 
easily delete or add authorized 
users using the same keypad. 

This fingerprint sensor is 
unique because it reads below 
the surface of the skin— making 
It possible to read virtually 
every fingerprint. It was 
designed to be easy to use and 
reliable, to help prevent home- 
owners from being locked out of 
their homes. 

The AuthenTec creators test- 
ed the TruePrint™ technology 
In extreme weather environ- 
ments—such as tennis camps in 
Florida and ski slopes— and in 
prisons and hospitals where the 
individuals' prints might be 
hard to capture. 

The lock is powered by four 
AA batteries, which will last 
through more than a year of 
normal use. The lock signals 
ahead of time when batteries 
need to be replaced— similar to 
a smoke detector. It also features 
a traditional key entry option as 
a backup. 

The BioLock is available via 
select retail outlets and the 
Internet and in national home 
supply stores. 



[Hb^I 



An Indopendonl Mombor Broker 
Alt Financing Subject to Chnngo 






ii 




FABULOUS NEW WADS WORTH HOME 

On 2 j acres In Jonallran Vnnlls. IS room, 4 bedroom, 4- 1/2 bain, 4 car garage. 2 ■ 
sty tamlty rm w/ (lour-lo-cciling fireptacc. Maple & granite kitchen. Master has 
silling area, fireplace, my ceiling & vaulted Uuury hath. Finished bsml w/rec rm, 
Jen, halh & home thcaicr. Breathtaking! SI, 049.000 
RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl « (847) 223-7878 




REftflK 

Center 

Center and Atkinson, Grayslake, IL 

www.lakecountyhome.com 

(847) 223-7878 



Each ofllco inde- 
pendently owned 
and operated. 




Richard H.Capoccioni 

CRB.CflS 




ELEGANT COUNTRY ESTATE 

5 bedroom palatial home In Gumee '» Hunt Cluli farm*! Upper hall overlooks the 
2-sty great nn w/limcslonc fireplace & gorgeous arctic d window*, Indoor lap pool, 
gourmel kilchen, hi fl matter suite, maid's quarters, cherry mottled study, 4.6 acre 
Int. 52.500,000 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl » (847) 223-7878 



NEW GURNEE LUXURY HOME 

5 bedroom home on over 2 acres with pondl Stilt lime to make selections. Catwalk 
upper hull has view of 2-sty family room with fireplace & 2 sty foyer. Den off 
kitchen w/flreplucc. 3 car garage, Huge gourmet kitchen. Master Jus tray ceiling + 
sitting rm w/fi replace! $1,079,000 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (817) 223-7878 




PANORAMIC GOLF COURSE LOT 

Gorgeous 3 OR ranch with 3 baths! Cathedral living niom with brick fireplace. 
Gourmet maple kilchen w/graniie lops & stainless appliances. Vaulted screened 
porch A brick icrracc. Expanded master with his & lien walk-Ins and whitlpool 
balh, Finished lower level. Hardwood floor. iTnitgluut Merit Clubl $699,900 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 




TWO-STORY GREAT ROOM 

Outstanding Wadswanh home on over an acre. 2-sty entry with magnificent view! 
Oak kitchen w/aak floor, bayed breakfast area w/iray ceiling. Family room has fire- 
place St bullt-Ins. 9' ceilings on 1st fl & bsml. 4 hedrm + den. 3-1/2 baths, 4 car 
garage. $535,000 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 




GURNEE'S STEEPLE POtNTEl 

Beautiful S bedroom, 4-1/2 hath home with finished English basement. Snaring ceil- 
ings. 2-sty foyer, living room &. family room with hardwood floors. Huge mailer 
with sitting area, walk-In closel & large balh. I si floor bedroom & balls. Deck over- 
looking brick pallo, $300,000 

' RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 




HOME ON BEAUTIFUL 3.4 WOODED ACRES 

Living room lias hardwood floor & handsome stone Fireplace, Newly remodeled 
kitchen) Finished lower level odds family room with fireplace, bath & rec nn/den. 
City sewerl Loculcd In Lake Villa & can be subdivided! New doors & windows, 
5469,900 R|CMARD CAl'OCCIONl • (817) 223-7878 




AWESOME LAKEFRONT HOMEI 

New home wilh tall ceilings, 4 bedrooms, 3-1/2 baths, 3 car garage. Walkout level 
makes 3 levels of lite home wlih walls of spacious windows offering a lake view. 
Anlioch home on tlluff Lake. Deck & balcony w/vlew. 2-il grel room, $1,400,000 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 




HUNT CLUB FARMS 

when you purchase this gorgeous 5UR home in Wadswurth on 2 acresi 1st fl Masicr 
Suite w/acccss to deck wilh hot tub. Vaulted family mi w/fireplocc. Vaulted sunrm 
w/largc Pallodian window, 3 car Garage. 2 acre lot. Hardwood doors. Finished lower 
level, $775,000 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl * (847) 223-7878 





WADSWORTH HOME ON 7 ACRES > 

HUGE implc kitchen w/granlle lops. Vaulted family rm tt/fhxir-lo-ceiling fireplace & doors 
to deck wilh panoramic view of Hum Guh Farms! Vaulted mailer wAukohy & marble bath. 
Full finished walk-oul hunt oddi ree rm, fam nn w/flnrpl & balh. 3 ear garage. 5 1,049,000 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl « (847) 223-7878 - 



ru r.iSLlJ4_ B 

sLUiii! 



V 



IN THE HEART OF LIBERTYVILLE 

NEW 4 bedroom, 2.|/2 bath home w/3 car garage. Hardwood floors all main rooms 
on 1st floor. Tons of detailing including Him, moldings, ceilings. Cherry kilchen 
w/gtaniie lops. Fasmily room has plasma home heater equipment t $899,900 
RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 




Top-quality home In Lindcnbursl's beautiful Emerald Ridge, maple kitchen w/gron< 
lie lops, 2-sly family room w/floor-lo-ceiling brick fireplace. Hardwood floors, huge 
master suite w/silllng rm & mathle whirlpool hath. Cnmn molding, tray ceilings, 
5 bedrms. 4 baths. Like new! 5699,000 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (847) 223-7878 



BEAUTIFUL RANCH ON .9 ACRE 

New 16 homesltc custom development In Lake Villa. 9' ceilings! Huge vaulted great 
rm/fam nn open to cherry kitchen w/granile (ops. Masicr has tray ceiling, walk-in 
closet St. whirlpool balh. 3 car garage. Full bsml. 5537,500 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 




MILL CREEK CROSSING 

Beautiful Gumee home with 4 bedrooms & finished basement. Oak (loon and trim. 
Kilchen has center island & granite lops. Open to vaulted great room with floor-to- 
celling slone fireplace & wall of windows. Vaulted master. Basement adds rec room 
& office w/gorgeuui oak bullt-Ins. Priced la sell! 5499.900 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 



M 



J\ 






M 



v- 




CUSTOM ANTIOCH HOME 



Orick front home wilh marble foyer. 2-tly family room with fireplace & tray celling. 
Open la spacious kitchen with hayed eating area • sundeck access. Huge master 
w/walk-ln closel, troy celling & whirlpool bath. 4 Mrooms, 3 1/2 baihs! $449,000 

RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 




EXCEPTIONAL 

When only the best will do.„L«adcd4 bedroom Lake Villa home has 2-sly family 
tin Si living rm! Cherry-stained kilchen w/nak floor Si granite tops, Hardwood floors 
on I si floor. 3- 1/2 halhs, 3 car garage. Crown molding, extensive lighting, patio, 
sprinkling system, granite fireplace. $550,900 

RICHARD CAPOCCIONI • (817) 223-7878 , 




VOLUME CEILING IN FAMILY ROOM 

Gumee 4 bedroom home In TimDcrwiods, Beautifully landscaped w/iprinkllng sys- 
tem! Theater setup In 'family room Including Mitsubishi TV, DVD, VCR, surround 
sound. 1st floor study, Oak kilchen w/oak floor. Very well maintained. 5487,000 
RICHARD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 221-7878 




WADSWORTH VICTORIAN 

Great 5 bedroom home on 1.3 acre loll Cherry kitchen open to vaulied family room 
w/fireplace. Third floor Is a spacious finished room w/vaullcd celling! Hi fl master 
wilh fireplace, walk-In closet & whirlpool Isathl Deck A gaunt). Priced lo sell. 
$449,000 

RICI IAKD CAl'OCCIONl • (847) 223-7878 



¥ 



\ * fc *■» 



C4« Friday, April 27, 2007 



CLASSIFIED 



Lake County Journals / lakecountyjournals.com 



I LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 



CLASSIFIED 



OUR PHONE LINES ARE OPEN: 

Monday - Friday • 8:30 am - 5:00 pm 

800-589-8237 

Fax: 815-477-8898 




email: classified@nwnewsgroup.com 
helpwanted@nwnewsgroup.com 



Deadlines: For Display Ads • MONDAY, 5pm • Line Ads & Legal Notices • TUESDAY, 5:00 pm 



Merchandise 



Packages From 
4 Lines • 1 Week 





Items $99 
or Less 

Willi Coupon 
Only! 



"HIRETHE 
BEST" 

OUR ADS GET 
RESULTS!. 



Call for Rates 
and Specials. 
Print 

and On-line 
recruitment ads 
available... 



; Ads appears in 7 
Weekly Journals 

Antlocli Journal j Gurncc/ 

Lake Villa/ j Wadswortli journal 
LlHtfciiliursi Journal i Fox Lake Journal 

Grayslnkc louriial ] Wauconda Journnl 
Hound I -akc Journal \ 



2000 •Announcements 
3000 • Employment 
4000* Merchandise 
5000 • Transpdrtation 



6000 'Real Estate 
70W)« Rentals 
8000 • Legals 
s03-s99« Services 




Promotions 2200 Free 



•1100 



Appliances 4120 Bicycles 4160, Computers 4200 Furniture 4240 Furniture 4240 Housewares 



4200 Machinery & Musical 

Tools 4320 Instruments 4360 



ATTEND COLLEGE 
ONLINE From Homo 
'Modical 'Business 'Par- 
alegal 'Computers "Crimi- 
nal Justice. Job placomonl 
Assistance. Computer pro- 
vided. Financial aid il qua!- 
iliod. 860-658-2121 www, 
onllncTidwnlerTccti.com 



55"T.V.!nOakArmolro 
Works. 847-658-0277 

Bi-Foid closet doors 
hardware Brown Luan. 
1-24'. 2-36". FREE. 
815-759-1502 




FIREWOOD FOR FREE 
Largo Logs, Lag Splilor 
Recommended! Crystal 

Lake. 815-788-0881 

FREE MULCH 

Wonder Lako address. 
815-353-1906 



FREE TO A GOOD 
HOME? 



Ralrigerator 

Full size, great lor baso- 
mentor garage, S99.00 
w/ 847-530-1146 



Rolrigorolor/Froozor 
Whirlpool, beige, good 
1 condition. Great "boor 
I ridge (or gorage. $75.00 
,815-931-4763 You haul. 

, Ronco ShowTlma BBO 
Rolisserio Model 2000. 
Unused w/ accessories. 
575.00 815-861-6411 

Washer GE 11 yrs old 
works $90 815-334-9421 



Licensed 
Childcnrc 



2010 



WASHER MAYTAG 
Totally ovortiaulod last 
year. Ivory. $99.0Q/obo 
815-455-2622 



Round Lako Beach 

Tiny Treasures Homo 
Daycaro Ages birth- 12 yrs. 
6:30am - 6:00pm. CPR/f 
Ald Cert, USDA Food 
Progam. Military wolcomo. 

224-643-7504 
www.Unylroat urea 1 23.com 



Attention Pol Advertisers: 

Before placing your ad 1 

find a now home lor you 

pet, consider tho following 

'Free* may imply something 

Is wrong and dolour loving WASHER 

homes Trom cwuldoilng l9 MayU , gi W ite 

SMfSSSffiKS Siighireak. S25.00 

told that somo unscrupulous nl ? r CQ ,,1, 
animal dealers who aro nol ' 5 ' 568 ' 1 '" 7 
concerned with lha props 
treatment ol animals, tend It 
scorch for FREE pels. A 



great, 



Blko Trailer & Jogger 
Ills up lo 2 kids. 100 lbs., 
flog & canopy, Exc. cond. 
$99.00 Firm 81 5-356-5505 

Boy's 20" Mongoose 
Full suspension bike, 
7 speed. .BluoS silver. 
$40.00 630-232-O2B8 

Burley UV Cub bike 
trailerytouggylor2klds, 
Brand now. $99.00 
815-404-6969 

Duo Sport Biko 

Trailer/Stroller. Hold 2 kids 
i up lo 100 lbs. $50.00/obo 
815-482-6720 

Kenl 7000 Aluminum Girl's 
26* All terrain 7 speed. 
Novor used. $75.00 
B47-6580953 

RACER BIKE 
26*rnon's, lOspoed. 
Good condition, $25.00 
847-873-3920 



Compaq PC, Monitor, now 
keyboard, mouso, Win- 
dows 2K, Office. 
$75. 847-639-7078 Ivmsg 

; COMPUTER 
Runs groat. K id's learning 
programs Included. 

$99.00 815-245-7645 



PC Power supply. Now, 
450W. ATX, BTX, P4, P3, 
P2.AMD. $30.00 Ivmsg. 
847-639-7076 



Entertainment 

Center 
3 Piece/Solid Oak 

75' wide x 85* tall, 
lighted with lad or, 

lots ol shelving 
and storago area. 

UKE NEW! 

$425/obo 

tr815-653-1097o 



FircwoodV 
Fireplace 



Firewood 

Needs to be split. 

20-25 logs. $20.00 

847-217-5884 



Enlortalnmenl Conter 
4220 Ivory Lacquer finish. Can 
holdup to a 32* T.V. plus 
6 components. Can email 
pholos. 630-406-8744 



White Wicker Headboard 
60* wide, 55* tail. $40.00 
815-479-0627 



Collectibles 4250 



1960 PLAYBOY Cigarotlo 
Lightor. Starting at 

$500.00! MakoOHerl 
630-584-8544 

Rockwell Kent Plato 
*Our America* Chicago 
Rivor, raised draw bridgo. 
$35,00 630-879-O463 



Lamp Sol 

Pretty, rose & brass, 30* 
tall w/ shade. Nico. 
$40.00 815-459-4149 

Lexington Punch Bowl Sot 
12 cups. 1950's. S20.00 
815-338-2061 

LONGABERGER 
Woven traditional, 4 plates 
4 mugs, 3 bowls. Red. 
$70.00 B15-307-8345 



Jewelry 4300 



Hoi! Working Head Pump 
Good condition. S35.00 
815-245-2636 Ivmsg. 

Machinist Vice 
16* long x 6* wide x 6* 
oponlng. Vory good cond. 
$99Jobo 847-658-3772 

SAW BLADES 7-1/4 Car- 
bide 24 tooth, brand new 
Inbox, (20) $5 ape. or SB0 
lorbox.847-380-0529^ob 



i 

PIANO Kimball Spinel! 

With bench, reconlly 

tuned and serviced 

Exc cond! $925 

B47-543-1309 

i 

RMSG 12 Guitar Amplifier. 
Good condition. 12 Wall l 
Oulpulpowor, $35.00 
815-459-4873 

Small Hohnor Tango IIB 
Accordion. $110.00 
847-949-1416 



Medical 



Home 
Electronics 



4280 



50's Costume Jewelry Pnntnmonr 
7 matching necklaces & Equipment 
earrings t many more 
Items. $60. 847-426-4078 



4330 ' Photography 4370 



Entertainment Cenlor 
Saudor, holds 27" TV 
Lots ol storage. $40.00 
815-479-1264 



Unlicensed 
Childcare 



WashorVDryor 

Fisher , & Paykol. New 

smalT'leo'win^o en'oou^ f J™^'^ i f^ 9 BuildingSupplieS 

age potential owners to con $975.00 630-845-1 196 
■ sldcr the responsibilities InJ 

volved In pet ownorshlp. Wd WASHER/DRYER 
j strongly recommend there] GE Slacked. Approx 6 yrs 
imon (ore, thai your ad contain d old. You Haul. $99.00 
**"•*" price lor the animal. '815-276-7519 Harvard 



4170 



5' S.S. 3 Comp. Sink 
' w/ laucet & bottle racks. 
$99.00 815-337-2437 




ROUND LAKE BEACH 

day care in my homo 
Immod. FT openings avail. 
Walking distance from Ellis 
Elom School. Bolore/altor 
school care all ages. Exc 
rols w/ a loving In mil y envi- 
ronment. Please contact 
Mary Koy 847-270-9272 



Notices 



2225 



Germon Shepherd 1 year 

with cralo, owner moving, 

call (or screening process. 

815-382-3341 

Lifetime Portable 

Basketball system. 

Polo, rim, backboard. 

847-639-2 197 Cary, IL 

Magnavox Big Screen 46' 
Needs woik. Free. 
847-639-1915 

WEIGHT MACHINE 
BMI weight circuit, needs 
minor work. $99. 
847-404-4119 



Washor/Dryer 
Kenmoro Elite, Electric 

Top loading, warranty. 
$600.00 030-365-0960 

WASHER/DRYER 
Kenmore, While, electric, 
Large capacity. Work 
greal. $90.00 each. 
815-477-213B 



Arts/Antiques 



4130 



BRICKS - NEW 
200 RodisWbrown color. 
$99.00 815-459-3421 ' 

Hardwood Flooring. 
Unfinished, Rod oak, 
20tsq.fl.,2Wxtt". 
$35.00 615-459-4617 

KITCHEN SINK 
EUER Double Bowl Cast 
Iron w/faucol. White. 
FREE 815-759-1502 



'FREE CASH GRANTS!* 
$25,000++ '2007* NEVER 
REPAYI Personal. Modical 
Bills, Business, School/ 
House. Almost ovoryone 
qualities! Livo Operators. 
Avoid Deadlines! listings 
1-800-785-9615 exl... 239 

High School Reunions 

Planning a class reunion? 

Searching for class mem- 
bers? Classrcpon.org 
gives Ireo web space, 

database, planning tools, 

www.ciassrcporf. 
. org/lreospace/ 



Apparel/Furs 4110 



Bridesmaid Dross 
Size 4, never worn. 2pc. 
strapless, tilacAavondor 
SBO.QO 63O-939-QO06 

Chilton Tea Length Dross 
Size 12, Lavender, worn 
once. Shoes, slzo 9 14 
S50.00 630-232-4165 



CARPET SWEEPER 
Mint, late 1800 or 
early 1900. S85.00 
815-459-9555 

i CASH REGISTER 
OLD, Not brass. 
$99.00/obo 815-347-9325 

Farm Hay Rake Whool 
Black Iron. 44" wide x 
214" rim widlh. $20.00 
815-459-1505 

HAVILAND LIMOGES 
OYSTER PLATES. 
4, vory old. $200.00 
630-557-0104 alter 5pm 



Ladder Sol, Wood 
1-24' extension; 1-16' 
ranch; 1-16' stringer. 
$99.00 815-568-2854 



; 



Now Oak Baso Cabinets 
2 drawer bases 21" 
1 double door 24" $300. 
630-677-8414 



Furniture 4240 K 



2 Flexstool Solas 
Vory good condition. 
90' Length, Dark Green. 
$199.00 815-337-4603 

Basset Triple Dresser 
Walnut Color w/ mirror. 
$99.00 firm 847-669-8475 

BED - Full Size frame, 
White mstal headboard, 
including mattress & box 
spring, Very clean. 
$99.00 815-337-1773 

, Bedroom Set, Queen/king 
Marbled linish, mirrored 
headboard. 2 night stands, 
dresser w/mirror. $199.00 
224-558-6357 

BRASS BED 

Full Size, Modem style. 

$99.00 847-526-9109 

'BUFFET 60"Wx30'H 
> Dark wood, excellent 

condition. Good storage. 

$99.00 815-344-4385 



NE 



TODAY! 



; Security Cago 10x16' 
,Wi(h 4'. door, hardware. j $60.00 
■ posi, 1 elevation. S250. 
224-569-3055 exc. cond. 



BunkBod 

! White, metal Irame. 
Top twin, bottom lull. 

" B1&WI77-2S12, 



ENTERT1ANMENT 

CENTER oak, glass 
lop doors w/lights. Exc 

cond. Holds 27" TV. 
72Hx16Dx78W. $300 

obo 647-546-6109 

Glider w/ ottoman 
Light Blue cushions w/ 
whilo base. $45.007bolh 
847-669-0574 

KING SIZE MATTRESS 
& BOX SPRING. Clean. 
$99.00 815-923-2884 

Love Seat 

Green, good condition. 

S40.00/ODO 815-338-2542 

' Loveseal by This End Up 
Navy cushions, excellent 

; condition. $80,00 
847-659-9644 

LOVESEAT 

Off-while $35.00 
847-816-0474 



27" Zenith color TV w/ 
6' entertainment cenler. 
Goodcandilion. $99.00 
Or best. 847-515-2391 

32" ProScan, Non-HD TV 
w/s1and& audio rack. 
Excellent condition. 
$99.00 815-728-1182 

Alpine MP3 Head Unit 
1000 watt Kenwood Amp 
2 Alpine 10' subs. 
S1.800.fobo 630-443-0657 

Computer Monitor 
15" LCD Rat panel, w/ 
built-in speakors. Works 
greal. $99. 847-754-5297 

Pioneer Speakers 
GS-G404. 150 watts, 15" 
3-way speakers. $150.00 
630-365-6285 

ProScan 36* Console TV 
Good condition. $99.00 
847-494-4373 

San Disk Sansa 1 GB. 
MP3 Player, Greal shapo, 
few scratches, $29.99/obo 
815-477-8178 

Television 12' color 

I w/ remote, Works greal. 
,$45.00 630-402-0717 
or 630-414-1454 



Maurice LeCrolx Welch 
Ladies, stainless steel. 
$3QQ,00fobo 
630-879-0483 

Wedding Jewelry 
Never worn, pearl <£ rhlne- 
stono chokers bracelet 
S30Jset 630-939-0906 



LIFT CHAIR, electric re- 
clining, beige upholstered. 
Gootfcond. $99. 815- 
459-1274 



Miscellaneous 



PHOTOGRAPHY DEVELj 
OPING SINK Temp con! 
trolled. Water filler. Al 
plumbing Included $99 
Call Marly al: 815-334^ 
8051 



4340 Spas, Jacuzzis 
& Pools 4390 



Lawn& Garden 
4310 



100+ CERAMIC MOLDS 
$200.00 or olfer. You haul. 
630-208-7865 or 
630-267-8382 



Clear Display Cases, ap- 
prox. 75, many different 
sizes, S50./obo for all. 
847-812-4834 



Complete Lawn Care & 
. Landscaping Services 

Spring Clean-ups! Thatch- 

ing. Aeration. Fertilizing, Iron plate, angle beams, 

Weekly mowing, Expen- E!P°*,*|».pO 

enced, dependable & fully 815-347-9325 

insured. Santos 847-878- 

5216,MikoB47-875-9975 



lor bag 815-455-3399 

Personals 2250 <#"'* c | s " a ' s |flCks 

34x29, $10.00 
,630-20B-15B9 



Girl's Clothing 

Size Newborn -6x. . 

Vfirv oood condition S40 Manlyn Monroe 1 1 x14 

very gooo conoiiion. sw. -.,.'._. Pfinl r „M if . t 



FREE BROCHURES 
WAKE UP 

with 

MAKEUP! 

MICRO TATTOOING of 

■EYEBROWS 

'EYELINE 

'LIPLINE 

Also offering 

Electrolysis by Sherry, 

(Permanent Hair Removal) 

FREE Consultation 

847-249-7446 

Adoption 2275 



ADOPT: 

Caring loving Mom, 

adoring successful Dad 

will LOVE & cherish 

your baby, 

1-800-977-8525 

Susannah & David 

1-800-977-5825 

Expenses pnld 

ADOPTION 
A BABY IS A GIFT OF 
LOVE Peter's a pediatri- 
cian and Toula is a stay 

homo mom. We'll givo 
your baby uncondilion 
love, financial security 
and a playful, adoring 
lamily. We're hero for you 
PETER AND TOULA 
800-997-1723 



4000 

Merchandise 



Men's Dross Slacks 
34x29, $10.00 
630-208-1589 

PROM DRESS 
Jessica McCtintock Junior 
size 11, Pink w' wrap. 
S75.00 224-436-1952 

PROM DRESS 
Lilac, Sizo 10, 2 piece, 
floorlength. Pic. avail. 
$45.00/000 815-337-9126 

PROM DRESS Size 6, 
Velvet, Hunter green. 
Strapless, lull length w! 
cape. Worn once. 
$40.00 815-477-2834 

Prom Gown - Evening 
Size 4, silver/gray, floor 
length. Classy, mlod top. 
$50.00 B15-923-2994 

! PROM GOWN 

, Small, fitted, spaghetti 
strap, Sparkle black lace 
over dark red. $50.00 

1 815-923-2994 

j Woman's Motorcycle 

I Boots, size 9M, Code 
West. Al! leather, 
$40.00 815-385-8718 



Colleclor Print Corlilicate 
of authenticity. $99.00 
847.658-3615 

Old Oak School Clock 

Sessions dock work. 

$150.00 Firm 

630-679-1709 



Solid Birch Wall Cabinets 
Old, 20' linear ft., Good 
condition, $99,00 
224-569-3655 after 5pm 

WINDOW w/ SCREEN 
4'x4\ S20.00 
815-338-6957 

Wood Extension Board 
7'-11', Solid. $40.00 
847-458-2749 

I Wood Storm Door 
w/ screen, 32'x81" 
Right hand swing; $35.00 
1815-459-4617 



Coflee Table 
48" square, 12" high. 
Parsons style, like new. 
S75.00 815-728-0707 



, Mattress Verio twin extra I 
Hong 45.6* X B2- Hardly! 
' used $50 
. 815-307-8296 

: MOVING SALE] 
POOL TABLE $800.00 

! CALL FOR MORE.,.. 
630-232-0785 



Computer Desk w/ hutch, j 
iHas side book shell, lile, 
drawer, small drawer. &j Oak Drop leal Table 
I cabinet In hutch. $25.00 1920s. Very nice! 
847-462-2597 i «-)(23\ or 42'x48 



Poplar Grove Country 

Market/Antique Matt has 

DEALER SPACE 

available 815-765-9550 
or847-363-4B14 

TOP DOLLAR PAID 

r Always buying antiquos & 
collectibles. One place lo 
enliro estate (647) 436- 
5580 or (647)394-5579 

Vintage 1920's Steamer 
Trunk. With drawers & 
hangorrod. $100.00 
630-205-4826 



Business 
Equipment 



4180 



COMPUTER DESK, while, 
w/ 2 matching bookcases. 
$100. On. Anno cherry cof- 
fee table, S25. 2 metal 
horse stall guards, $50/ea. 
830-965-2059 

Couch by This End Up. 
Navy cushions, excellent 
condition. $99.00 I 
847-659-9644 

COUCH Floral, came! 
back, 90', mauvo, green, 
creams. Very good cond. 



Vi Moon Oosk w/ book- . 
lease attached. Pull out $99.00 815-236-6027 

drawer lor keyboard. Light i 

wood w/ granite like lops. 'p,H u SL ■ „„„»„ 

$99 00 6l5-477-03Bf Light Colors. $250,00 

1 630-232-0785 
CHAIRS (6) lor conference 
room, navy blue, liko new! 
$80 815-814-2302 



I $99.00 815-943-1213 

Oak Wardrobe 

$50,00 II 

847-816-0474 

1 

'POOL TABLE 

Gandy, 1" thick xB'slalo. 
| Leather pockets, includes 
; balls, racks, cue sticks & 
: table light. $995.00 
. 630406-8744 

QUEEN HEADBOARD 
I w/ Lights & bed frame. 
$75.00/obo B47-587-7361 



TRACK 1 
STEREO 

Repairs, Receivers, 
tape decks, CD 
players. Reel to 

Reel, Turntables & 

More! 
Repanv On iranti iv 
Buy Vntage ilpieo 

Compcncnis Dead or 

Alivp M-.u buy vinyl 

LP rworcs, 
847-830-2346 



Craftsman Lawnmower 
Roar bagger, $85.00 
815-363-9970 

ECHO LEAF BLOWER 

Works great. $55,00 
630-377-5410 

LawnChlelPushmower 
w/ rear bagger & mulch kit, 
electric blower. $99.00 
815-923-2890 

I Lawn Chief/Lawn Tractor . 
Model 420, 12HP. 36' 
mower dock. Good condi- 
tion. $99. B15-356-O034 

LAWN MOWER 

TORO Self-propelled 

$100.00 Firm 

815-943-4620 

TORO Personal Pace 
Lawnmower. 3 yrs old. 
Great shape w/ bag. 
$99.00 815-337-6062 

| WOOD SWING on stand 
■$20.00 815-459-9555 



Ivory Chess Set 

'From China In 1973 

Mint Condition. 

$1,100.00 
630-232-1080 

King Size Mattress 
Flippable, greal condition. 
Great for platform bed. 
$99.00 773-507-7789 

! Law Books; West's Illinois 
| Decisions, North Eastern 
'Reporter, $1,000.00 
630-33B-515B 

MEMORY FOAM | 
I THERA-PEUTIC 
NASA.-V1SCO MATTRESS 

WHOLESALE 
As Seen On TV. Queen- 
$399, King-S499. All sizes 
available! Electric adjusta- 
bfos $999. FHEE Delivery. 
25Yr Warr. 60 Night Trial. 
800-ATSLEEP eoo-287-5337 , 
www.ma ttressdr.com 

MONOCULAR 
r NighLSlorm - Night Vision. 
$160.00 815-344-5269 



BAJAHOTTUB Seats 4 j 
In or outdoor w/cover. , 
Good condition. $199/000, 
847-680-4312 



Sporting Goods 

4410 



GOLF BAG w/ 7 Irons, 

3 drivers, wedge, putter. 
Greal Starter set. $99.00 
815-895-4454 

Golf Clubs 

4 woods, Titloist w/ covers. 
9 irons, Wilson. Puller, 
umbrella, bag & cart. 
$75.00 630-5B4-2322 

LADIES GOLF BAG 

& SHOES, 9M. 
$30.00 815-356-7931 

POOL TABLE, 6 footj 
great condition. $99. 847* 
997-3439 



Exercise 
Equipment 



4415 



Machinery & 
Tools 



4320 



Typewriter IBM Seloctrtcl 
Correcting, blue housing,! 
script font, new ink & cor- I 
reeling cartridge, $45/obo. 
815-575-4412 



Housewares 4290 



Baby Items 4150 



EXECUTIVE HIGH BACK 
OFFICE CHAIR. 
Excellent condition. 
S80.00 815-258-8138 



Couch, loveseal, chair 

2 lamps, 2 sets of pillows, 

valances, pastel. Like now 

SlOOO/obo 630-845-9228 



Dining Tablo 

40' Round w/ 2 chairs, 

$99.00 847-818-0474 



Double Stroller 1J/ drawers Standard ' Dining/Kitchen Tablo 

Joep Wagonoor, brand Sw sat? Ofl meat lor H °™y Oak vrf 4 scroll 
new. Paid $150.00. Sell hOTooH^o BI5I21 8077 chair3 - «' w/ 1B" teal. 
Ior$99.00l 815-648-4343 , riomoomco ™™ Bl T 1 S475.00 630-879-1709 

cmi„ Q„., n , T nn ^ n m i 0HiCQ Desk & accessories I 
Eddie Bauor Tandem Mt .„ «onntw 

Stroller. Tan/black. Greal b^) 338^51SB 



Rocker/Recliner Chair 
Dark blue. $30.00 
224-558-6357 

■ Sewing Machine Cabinet 
Wood, 3 drawer. 
42*Wx22'Dx28*H 
$30.00 815-477-2566 

SLEEPER COUCH 
Brown, Simmons. 
Excellent Condition. 
$75.00 630-5B4-0914 

Small Easy Chair/Reclinor 
Burgundy velvet 
$99.00 815-578-069B 



12 Place Settings 
PlalzgralfYorklowne 

1 w/ many extras. $99.00 

1 B15-455-6257 



'PORTA POWER* 
In Box. $50.00 
847-421-2081 

15ff Slide Hammer 
vtl 12 assorted end 
attachments. $99.00 
! 847-421-2081 



Shelving Adjustable size, 
Steel Irame, Industrial type 
tor garage/basement. 
j $75.00 B1 5-459-4149 

i STEEL SHELVING 
7'HX36"W. 
1 1 Excellent condition. 
1 $20.00 815-459-5340 

1 Utility Trailer 
l 6B"Lx52*Ww/ lights, 
Grealfor ATV or Mower. 
$199.00 815-568-5508 



i Cordless 3/B Impact Driver 
1 New Milwaukee, 2 batler- 
i fes, charger, case. Model 
I 12 Place Settings; plates, , 9057-1 , $165.00 
'cups, saucers. i=7o/a*. i 630-377-0870 
: blue w/ gold rim. $25.00 



Auctions 



4050 



'Appliances 4120 

! AIR CONDITIONER 
'5000BTU. 2 Window units. 
. Cool a large room easily. 
i$40.00oa. 847-515-2703 

Air Conditioner 
Window unit, $30.00 
|815-353-1906 

CHEST FREEZER 
Kenmoro, 14.8 c.f, 
Excellent condition, 
$99.00 847-669-1643 



condition, cloan. $80.00 
815-923-7578 (Marengo) 

Graco Pack & Play 
Great Condition. 

$40.00 
815-477-B361 

Jogging Stroller 
Good condition, $45.00 
815-648-4343 

Safely First Walker 
Clean & simple, like new. 
$15.00 
815-923-7576 (Marengo) 



OFFICE DESK 
WOOD,30'Wx60'L 
I $99,00 B47-482-7074 

TABLE 7 FT. ROUND 
1 You pick up. $99.00 
815-784-9377 



DRESSER 

80", w/ matching Chest of 
drawers. Walnut Venoors, 
$99.00 847-658-7554 



Cemetery 
[Plots 



Dresser, Chest of drawers, 
2 night stands. Excellent 
condition. $300.00/obo 
'630-761-0417 

Eariy American Rocking 
Chair w/ cushions. I 
$40.00 815-459-2208 



SOFA& 
LOVESEAT 

Mint green tealh or, light 
oak and chrome side 
table, coffee table, 2 
sofa tables/wall table 
and a matching bistro 
table and 2 chairs. AH 
in great condition, sell 
as a sol only, $799. 
Debra 6 386-383-5424 



4100 



Vehicles & 

Equipment 

Consignment 

Auction 



Saturday, May S 
9:00 AM 

Grant Township 
Road District 

26535 W. Molldor Rd, 
Inglesldo.lL 60041 

OBENAUF AUCTION 
SERVICE, Inc. 

InglesidelL #044000105 

847-587-2095 

www.obonautfluclions.com 



Dish Washer 
LadyKenmoro, Black 

I Good working machine, 

II $75.00 815-344-4385 
i - - 

DRYER 

' Amana, Electric. 
'Excellent condition, 

$99.00 815-444-9077 



i Bicycles 4160 



i20"Schwinn, 10 speed 
i $50.00 847-669-2B52 

We'll pnnt & distnbulo over 
260,000 copies ol your ad 
every week! Journal Clas- 
silied (800)589-8237. 



Tho nicost people road 
classified ads I Journal ■ 
Classified (800)589-8237. j 



GAS STOVE 

Good condition, works 
greal. Remodeling. 
$99.00 B47-21 7-5884 

Hoover Widepath Vacuum 
Cloanor. 12 Amp motor. 
$60.00 847-431-2450 

Refrigerator 

Admiral, lop freezer, while 

$50.00 830-845-1028 

www.chicagojobs.com 

Journal Classified 

(800)589-8237. 



2 Cemetery Lots In 
River Hills Memorial Park, 
$760.00 ea. Cash only. 
630-231-2906 

Wfndrldge Mem. Park 
2 premier burial plots In 
Calendar of Flowers. 
608-987-2690 

Weekly Journal Wost de- 
livers McHonry County's 

most qualified Job seekers. 
Journal Classified (800) 
589-8237. 



Need a Home? 

Home buyers look at loca- 
< (ion, price, visual Image, 

bedrooms, balhrooms andj _.. 

lootage as the 'T.V. Stand Tall, Oak wood 



| Solid Oak Dresser 

I light color slain on drawers 

| $99.00 815-923-2684 



square 

most Important rtoms ol in 
formation in a real estate 
for sale ad, Soil your prop- 
erty faster with help Irom a 
Journal Classified repre- 
sentative. Call (800) 589- 
8237 today. 



veneer, 
$50.00 



Holds 27" T.V. 
815-477-1236 



847-669-1130 

2 Cornices & Drapery 
Panels. Olive green, per- 
iod over double palio door 
$99.00 847-669-6820 

Baker's Rack - Wrought 
Iron w/ 2 wicker drawers, 
Wine rack on bottom. 
$99.00 815-479-0966 

Bed Tray While wicker 
Cup/magazine holders. 
Antique, perfect condition. 
$25.00 815-344-0116 

I BRASS LAMPS 
1 2 - 28*. S15.00each 
Excellent condition. 
,815-459-0318 

Comforter & Shams 
Queen, white, Battenburg 
lace trim. Period. 
$35.00 815-344-0116 

Cutting Table for Sewing. 
i Has shell, drawer & cutting 
' mat Included. $50.00 
1 630-892-82 11 after 6pm 



Craftsman 6" Planer/joiner 
Has now blades. $80,00 
847-497-9124 

Craftsmancement/ulility 
elocl ric mixer. $99,00 
847-497-9124 



Metal Portable 
Buildings 4350 



ALL STEEL! 
Clear Span & Truss build- 
ings. Excellent value and 
■service. FREE quote and 
j erection estimates! Sen-! 
1 tinel Building Systems, 
1 800-327-0790 x-26, www.' 
sentinelbuildings.com 



AB Lounge 
Barely used, great 
condition. $50.00 

847-812-4834 

BOWFLEX Tread Climber 
i Paid $1700 2 months ago, 
asking S1000. 

015-653-5302 

I Health Rider Exerciser 
! Like New! $99.00/obo 
j B15-56B-4420 

! PumpllUpl Like new, 
Weights w/ bench & 
accessories. $99.00 
847-516-0133 

i Welder Pro 4850 Weight 
j System. Like new. 
Paid S400, Sell $50.00 II j 
! You haul. 847-669-4619 | 

Weight Sol 225 lbs. . 

w/ 6' bar. fits Olympic 
1 bench. $75.00 • 
1 773-895-235B Huntley 

. Weslo Carrjio Glide w/ dial 
' resistance, total body, 
work out machine. Only 
S50.00I 815-621-8077 

WE'VE GOT IT1 

Journal Classified. 

(800) 589-8237. Visa 
Mastercard & Discove 
Card accepted. 



PRIME BUILDING MATERIAL 

AUCTION 

APRIL 28*29* 2007 

Lake County Fairgrounds, Grayslake, IL 



I T.V. Stand, comer unit 'King Size Bed Spread 
Iwalnu! wood veneer w/ Scroll pattern, neutral 
! doors, holds up to 32" T.V. | color a 2 decorator pillows. 
,$100.00 615-477-1236 | $40.00 847-428-6077 




The North Chicago 

Annual Pets Vaccination Clinic 

"will be held on" 

Saturday May 5, 2007 

10am-2pm 

at Hamlet Park, the entrance to 

Fobs Park Golf Course. 

Cats and Dogs welcome (or rabies 

vaccinations, lako county tags 

and microchip available lore lee. 

For more Information, call 

(647) 596*8875. 



BECOME FINANCIALLY INDEPENDENT 
WITH A REVERSE MORTGAGE! 



noons 

Interior doon 

Interior lii-folj Units 
French Doors 
OaL & Tine 6 Panel 
Birth & Loan Doon 
Oak Flush Doon 
Door I lard ware 

Eiltrtardoon 
Steel Entry Doors 
Leaded w/Sidelights 
Leaded Glass 
Cherry & Mahogany 
Swing Tatio door 
Door Hardwire 



F'-r-QBiNn 

Unfinished 2 l/4 H lo S" Plank Flooring 
in Oak, Maple, Chen}', Walnut and 
Oilier lixotic Woods 

Ite-fuiishcd Laminate Flooring 

Carpet and Carpel Pad 

KITCHEN A HATH 

t'ompleleKiithens 

Kitchen & Raih Cabinet* 

Sinks, faucets, Vanities' Light fixtures 

Jetted Tubs 'Toilets' Spas 

tii.f: 

Marble, Travertine 4 Ceramic Tile in 
4x4, 12x12, 16x16, 24x24 



WINDOWS 

AIIMaJorUrindi! 
Double Itimg Windows 
Vented/Fixed Casement 
Picture Windows 
Garden Windows 

MISCEILANF. 011S 
Hardware 
Lumber 

Siding, Roofing 
Molding & Trim 
Spindles & Stair Pans 
Deck Posts* Lock sets 
Power & Air Tools 
And Much More! 



• Pay credit card dobt nuninvMI 

• No out of pocket expense ^nUIL a^QNE 

• No mortgage payments for LIFE! mortgage inc. 

A mine morljajs mmiMsim igg$f -jjj 

................ m_ II. lli™lta*rtVlt-.l-_vi» Imm I «J™ 



www.ir»uiMirrwrtgig«>Ej»*rt.'.orn 



(fa thai HpiHntif Mnrlgqt ttewr] 



GATES OPEN AT 7:30 A.M. & AUCTION STARTS AT 9:00 A.M. 

PREVIEW FRIDAY, APRIL 27 FROM NOON TILL 6:00 P.M. 

PiY-rrgisler on line at www.ptsluiuclion.com 

TERMS: Buyer's Premium. Checks and Credit Cards welcome. I-'or exact terms visit 

our website or call (816) 474-1982, Sale day selections take precedence over all ivril- 

ten material. All purchases must be removed by NOON on Monday, April 3D, 

fitost be advised thai the auction is no place far mall children. 



CALL TOLL FREE TODAYt *| -800~21 3**653 1 



PEAK 

AUCTIONEERING 

BUILDING MATERIALS SPECIALIST 



Phone: 81W74-1982 

\ Bit ou r w eosite: w» w.peaka urtioa.com 

rordinctMiuind updates, 

WchardPcak.OIIOOO'M 

Phil Omvbill, 04I00044S 



[♦I-afti-ir-*^ 

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credit terms have been estabIished,,preL 
•Please Check Your Ad: To ensure the best re 
Occupied by the error:aftcr^ 




- -*. * - *■ *■ i^- 



■* ^^^-th-ai m_m_ >_ 



tatta** 



Lake County Journals / lakecountyjoLirnals.com 



CLASSIFIED 



Friday, April 27, 2007 vC5 



Telephone > Auto Parts & 

Equipment 4420, Supplies 5100 









n 



Sony Phono vil caller ID, 
Call waiting, speakor& 
answering machino. 
S 15.00 815-455-6627 



86-06 Ranger Lund 
To nncau cover. No rips, 
all hardware Included. 
S99;obo 815*334-1560 



Motorcycles 5700 CondosfTownhomcs 
For Salt; 0300 

1998 KX 250, DID Bike 

Wall maim, vary fast 

mods. SI BOO Must So ill 
815-455-5394 



Condos/Townhomcs Lcgnls 8100 Lcgals 8100 Legals 

For Rent 7300 



8100 Assumed Nome 



Tickets 

2 TICKETS $50.00 
Plain While T's 
5/2/07 at Molro 
630-313-9005 



AIR TANK 
4430 5 Gallon capacity, 

Tailgate tools. Likonow, 
S25.00 847-458-2749 

f Big Block Chroma Chovy 
Oil Pan. Uses stock pick- 
up. New/novor used. 
S60.00 815-276-6240 . 



Toys 



4440 



Bafbio Jeep Take Along 
Tunes. Incl. battery, charg- 
er, owner's manual. 
S150.00 630-232-0288 

Gas Powered RC Truck 
w/ Remote. Runs groat. 
S99.00/0bO 815*404-6969 

Liltlo Tykos Workbench 
Included tools. Excellent 
condition. $30.00 
815-477-2566 

SLIDE 8' long, yellow. 
Used, bul good shape, 
$50.00 815-568-7940 

TRAIN SET 
ITWORKSI 

$85.00 
815-943-0097 



CORVETT/GOODYEAR 
EAGLE EMT. Good tread. 
275/40 ZFVI B S99.00/obo 
815-344-1099 

FORD F-150 
Ladder Rack. Long bed, 
heavy duty. S99.00 
815-363-9863 

Four 17* Rims w/ Tiros. 
Fits 2000 Mustang, has 2 
bolt patterns. $400.00 
630-365-6285 

TRIUMPH TR-6 

Rear Differential, center 

section. $175.00 

630-879-2997 

Watering Tank- 200 gallon 
capacity w/ bilge pump & 
laucet, tils In p/u truck bod, 
S50/obo. 615-575-4412 



Autos 



5150 



Wanted to Buy 

4450 



Wanlod: FREE 

Upright Piano (or beginner 

use, 815-334-8722 



Pets& Supplies 

44G0 



2 Parakeets & 1 Love Bird 
w/cage & accessories. 
$60.00 for Allt 
847-530-2977 

3VJ yr old. Maslitl/Great 
Dane mix. Very sweet dog, 
good w/ kids. All supplies 
included. FreB to a good 
homo. 815-943-7324 

Beautiful Handled Baby 
LovBbird. $75.00 
847-334-9401 
815-578-8839 

Bird Cage New Prevue 
Hendryx, peach colored, 
wrought Iron. 18x16x60, 
with Playpen top. $99.00 
847-639-8572 

Cockaliel Pair 

$99.00 
815-301-1954 

Dachshund Pups 

AKC,7woeksold,2M-2F. 
S300-S400. 847-372-4827 

Dalmation - 4 yr old, fa- 
mate. Nice, friendly, good 
w/klds. Needs good homo. 
815-943-0547 

DOG - Free to good home 
While, Cockapoo, 16 
months old. Very loving 
dog. 847-516-3579 

Dog Kennel 5'xtO' 
Galvanized stool w/ roof. 
Excellent condition. 
$99.00 847-669-8475 

German Shepard/Lab 
/Amstaffmix. 6yrso!d. 
Free. 847-894-4522 

PIT BULL 1 yr old Fomata 
Great w/ kids & other ani- 
mals. Incl. Dish & Leash. 
Free to good home. 
815-529-8633 



$500 Polico Impounds. 

Cars from S500! 

Tax Rapes, US Marshal 

and IRS sales. Cars, 

Trucks, SUVs, Toyota's, 

Honda's. Chav/6 and 

morel For Ustings: 

1-B00-29B-I768x1010 

1973 DODGE 
CHALLENGER 

340 w/ numbers malching. 

Car |usl restored. $17,000. 

615-530-5033 

1994 BU1CK 

LESABRE 
63K miles, good condition, 
new tires and brakes, 
$3,500Vobo 217-899-3546 

1997 BMW 328IConv. 

Cobalt blue, 65K miles, 

great condition. $10,900 

630-232-6271 



2001 CHRYSLER 
PT Cruiser Ltd. 

33+K miles, exe co nd, 
$7,500. 815-943-083B 

Cars 4 Trucks Wanted 

Any condition, free 
towing. 815-477-1179 
* Top Dollar Paid * 



1999 Hartoy Davidson 
Dyna Wide Glide Red, 
Noss, Jokormachlno, Mus- 
tang Sampson, loadcdl 
Too much to listl $12,500/ 
best oiler. 630-229-8209 

2002 Hnrley Davidson 
Road King Classic 

Fuel Injected. 11Kml, cus- 
tom paint + many oxtras, 
MINT conditonl St 5,300 
815-4B2-4779 

2003 HARLEY DAVID- 
SON, Ultra Classic, FL- 
HTCUI, 514,500/OBO 

23K, miles. Period shapo. 
Extras Incl trailer hitch, lug- 
gage rock, saddle bags, 
glow lights, rotor covers, 
slider lights, all lights ore 
hooded. Lots of extra 
chrome. Color matched 
16 cu. II. trailer avail tor 
$1000 extra. 847-420- 
7782 

2003 KX125, Dirt Bike 
Well main!, mods, Must 
Sell $2300 815-455-5394 

2003 KX125, Dirt Bike 
Well ma int. mods, Must 
Sell $2300815-455-5394 

2003 VROD Hartoy David- 
son Anniv Edition, 
Screaming Eagle pipes, 
loss than 1000 ml. garago 
kepl,1 owner, $12,300 se- 
rious inquiries only. 
815-403-9326 

2004 Kawasaki 
KX 65cc Dirt Bike 



• Grayslake/Wildwood* 
Royal Oak: N.ol120 
Go E on Gages Lk Rd 
Largo 1 Bdrm $99,900- 
2Bdrmsfrom $119,900 
hid gar. Prking, Brick 20 
unit IGLR.E. 

847-548-5100 



Farms/Fnrmlnnd 
For Sale G400 



FOX LAKE Spacious 2 
bdrm Condo In Vacation 
Village gated with pool, 
tennis, on the lake, 
'SBOO/mo. 847-502-8251 

GURNEE Bridlewood TH 
Newly decorated 2 bdrm + 
loft, 2,5 bath, 1 car, c/a, 
appls, FP, beautiful view, 
S1325/mo + sec Brcnda 
RE/MAX Showcase, 847- 
596-6109, Virtual Tour® 
www, TJProportios.com 



tain sole legal and physical 
Whore applicable and custody ol your minor 
appropriate, the general child. You must tile your 
prevailing rate of wages In , answer or lake othor ac- 
Lake County. Illinois shall lion permitted by law in 
bo paid for each cralt or this court a) the Court ad- 
typo of workman or me- dross above on or bolero 
chanlc needed to execute Juno 2, 2007. II you fail to 
tho contract or perform do so, a dolault judgment 



Slate of Illinois, tor The 

Fiscal year beginning 

March 1, 2007, and ending 

February 28, 2008, will bo 

On file and conveniently AMERICAN 

available to public Inspoc- WASH 

lion at VILLAGE HALL OF Naluro/Purposo 

WADSWOTH • 14155 Truck Washing 



8200 



Namo of Business: 

TRUCK 



such work. 



ALDEN split level 4 bdrm 
2 bath, now updates, 5 
acres, pole bam, + in- 
come property. $440,000 
Thomas W Boestra Real 
Estate 815-236-4400 



Lots & Acreage 
For Side 64 GO 






Duplexes 
For Rent 



Scaled bids shall bo ad- 
dressed to Lincolnshire- 
Prairie View School District 
HI 03, Buslnoss Office, 
1370 Rivorwoods Road, 
Lincolnshire, Illinois 60069. 



may bo colored against 
you for tho roliol demand- 
ed In tho complaint filed In 
this case. 



7350 



all 



The Board of Education 
reserves the right to ac- 
cept or reject any or 

WINTHROP HARBOR, j-'t-s and lp waive nny In 

2000 sqft, 2 bdrm 2.5 both, formalities in bidding. 

possiblo bdrm in bsml. 

'Near schools. $1400 

month 847-417-7003 



THE COURT FINDS: 

1. Service of process 
upon dolondanl Dlanna 
Koonig cannot reasonably 
bo made as provided In 
MCR 2.105, and service ol 
process may bo made in a 
manner which is reason- 
ably calculated lo give de- 
fendant actual notice ol the 
Angela Borka, Secretary proceedings and an oppor- 
Boa rd of Ed ucaBon lunity lo bo hoard . 



Wodsworth Road, 

Wadsworth from and after 
12:00 o'clock P.M. Friday, 
April 27, 2007. 

Notice is lunhor given 
hereby that a public hear- 
ing on said Budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance 
will bo held at 7:15 o'clock 



Addfoss{os) whore busi- 
ness Is to bo conducted or 
transacted In this county: 
2244 Trallslde Lone, 
Waucondo, IL 60084, 
847-833-3429 

Nome(s) and post oflico 
or residence addross(os) 
ol the person (s) owning 



&Ki W 5fWS^KAT^' conducting or transacting 




ClnssicAutos 5200 

1976 CORVETTE 

New motor, trans, tires, 
brakes, exhaust, radiator,! 
shocks, outside #9, Inside 
#7.5, 5B200/ODO 81 5-337- 
0511or815-405-1013 

Buy, sell, browse Classic, 
Antiques, Hot Rods, Street 
Rods, and Motorcycles 
from across the MidwesL 
Free events and car ciub 
listing loo. Check out. . . . 
mldwestclasslccars.com 



Completely slock, 
Extremely clean, hardly 

ridden, very low hrs. 

It has the Kawasaki 

Team Green Chevy 
Trucks N-Slylo graphics 
& gripporseatcover.lt 

needs nothing and Is 

ready to ridel 
$1400 & I will deliver it, 
locally, if you needed. 

Call 815-482-0145 

for more Info, 
f can email you pics. 

2005 KX 250F, very last, 
$3800. Well Maintained. 
Must Sell! 815-455-5394 

2005 KX 250F, very last. 
$3800. Well Maintained. 
Must Sell! 815-455-5394 

82 Yamaha 550 

New tires, needs battery. 

$600.00/obo 

630-309-1752 



Beautiful Lake Murray 

(500+ milo shoreline) 
Columbia, SC. Waterfront/ 
lake access tots lor sale. 
Paved roads, utilities. Auc- 
tion June 9- Minimum bids 
$100,000 to $400,000. 

803-217-9171 
www.land.scano.com 

HOT SPRINGS, NC Galed 
residential community sur- 
rounded by National For- 
est. Paved roads, dub- 
house, waterfall, pond, hik- 
ing lraits& more. Lots start- 
ing at S50K. 877-477-3473 

Just$195.22/mo* 1+ acres 
with FREE Boat Slips 
$34,900, Nicely wooded 
lake access property in 
brand new premier devel- 
opment on Kentucky Lake. 
Prime waterfronts avail- 
able. Call 1-800-704-3154, 
xtllB "20% down, bal- 
ance financed 30 years, 
7.5 fixed, OAC. 

MARENGO 5 ACRES 

One of the nicest parcels 
that you will lind. Tree- 
lined, wrought Iron fencing, 
'huge brick pillars w/ 
wrought iron electronic 
gate with callbox. 660 ft 
i winding black-top, tree- 
lined driveway. Beautiful 
\ lawn, Zoned Agriculture. 
- READY TO BUILD 
$325,000 815-943*0008 



Houses 
For Rent 



7400 



A Lease Option lo Buy! 

Crystal Lake * Harvard * 

* McCullom Lake + 

Ml, Prospocl * Round 

Lake * Hanover Park * 

Rocklord*Gurnoo*Zlon 

815-477-1020 

ANTIOCH. small 1 bdrm 
on Chain. $725 + utilities & 
sec dep. No pets. 847* 
395-0470 leave message 

CHANNEL LAKE WATER- 
FRONT 6 rooms, 3 -bdrm., 
1 1 -bath; appls,, central ht. & 

air, $950/mo. +■ 1 mo sec 
dep. Tom 815-341-1967 

CHANNEL LAKE WATER- 
FRONT, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 7 
rooms, small bsml, c/a, 
appls, largo lot. $1250/mo 
+ 1/mo sec dep. Call Tom 
815-341-1967 

FOX LAKE Pistakee Lake- 
front, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, appl. 
pier, $900/mo, avail now. 
312-504-3441 



Daled this 27th day 

ol April, 2007 

(Published In the 

Grayslake Journal, April 

27, 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE NINETEENTH 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

ESTATE OF ANTHONY 
ELBLEIN, DECEASED 

GEN. NO 05 P BBS 

CLAIM NOTICE 

Notice is given of the 
death ol ANTHONY EL- 
BLEIN, of Waukegan, Illi- 
nois. Letters of Offico were 
Issued on November 4. 
2005, to RAYMOND EL- 
BLEIN, as Executor. Ra- 
mond Elblein's address Is: 
4355 Wahsington Street, 
Gumoe, Illinois. His attor- 
ney Is Daniel K. Sinclair, 
4170 Old Grand Avenue, 
Gumeo, Illinois 60031. 



IT IS ORDERED: 

2. Service ol tho sum- 
mons and complaint and a 
copy ol this order may be 
maoo by tho following 
method: 

a. First class mail lo: 
302 N. Waukegan Road, 
Lake Blufl.IL 60044. 

b. Other: Publication 
three consecutive weeks 
(one time each wook) in 
Lake County, Illinois 
Newspaper as provided by 
MCR 2.106(D) on or bo- 
lore May 30. 2007. 

3. For each method 
used, proof ol sorvico must 
be hied promptly with the 
court. 

Daled March 6, 2007 

Isl Thomas E, Nelson 
Judge 
Kurt M. Armstrong 
(P30322) 

Attorney lor Plaintiff 
511 Renaissance Dr., 
Suite 110 

St. Joseph, Ml 49085 
269*983-5777 
(Published in the Lake 
County Journals, April 20, 

?7 A Mau A 9007 1 



2007, at VILLAGE HALL 
OF WADSWORTH In this 
NEWPORT TOWNSHIP 
And that final hoaring and 
action on Ihis ordinance 
will bo lakon at a mooting 
lo bo Held at VILLAGE 
HALL OF WADSWORTH, 
at 7:30 o'clock P.M. 
Wednesday, May 30,2007. 
Dated this 26lh day ol 
April, 2005, 



business: 
Brian King. 2244 Trail- 
side Lane, Waucondo, IL 
60084,847*833-3429 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This is to certify that the 
undersigned inlond(s) lo 
conduct tho abovo named 
business Irom Iho location 



(s) indicated and lhat tho 

/s/ George Pavolich injo and legal full namo(s) 

Supervisor ol trio porson(s) owning, 

/s/MichelloEymor conducting or transacting 

Clerk tho businoss is/aro correct 

(Published in the Qumoo I as shown. 

Wadsworth Journal, April Isl Brian King 

27.2007.) April 11,2007 

PUBLIC NOTICE ""J, 8 'orogoing Instru- 

ment was acknowledged 



Triangle Storage will dis- 
pose of goods for non-pay- 
ment from: 

Unit It's 27 & 29 belong- 
ing to Adotph Kertoy con- 
sisting of heating ft cooling 
supplies and tools. 

Disposal of the items will 
lake place at Triangle Stor- 
age, 23480 West Grass 
Lake Road, Antioch, IL 
60002 on May 7, 2007 at 
10 am. 

(Published In the Antioch 
Journal. April 20 & 27, 
2007.) 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC 

HEARING ON 

ROD DISTRICT BUDGET 



Waterfront 
Property 



G515 



6000 

Real Estate for Sale 



LAKEOFTHEOZARKS 
LakefrontS 59,900 
Nice building site. 

Paved roads, all utilities. 
Call owner today! 

1-666-696-5263 x2585 

South Central FL Private 
Gated Community was 

$179,900 NOW $79,900 
1 to 3 acre lake access 
Owner must sell. Call 
1-888-320-8399 X1248 



Claims against the Es 

tate may be Tiled in tho Of 

FOX RIVER GROVE, Riv f| co | , ne ciark ol the Cir- PUBLIC NOTICE 

erfront charming cottage, C uit Court at 18 N. County rwufc -'^ ,,WM ,v "~ 

complotety rehab, 3 bdrm, Slr0fl , Waukegan, IL 

l.^- ^-S', S21S «™ ' 600es - Room c - 104 ' or 
S1295/mo. 847-668-7279 wi|h represGn , ativar or 

r>, ir-ucc n..„i«- <i u™ ' both, on or before October , 

hYmt l Conrad sSfflst' less than Six months Irom ihat a Tentative Budget 

SrstaBoSoVsM Tan tho date of first publication and Appropriation Ordi* 

1 of this notice and claim not nance for the ROAD DIS- 
liled wilhin that period is.TRlCT ol NEWPORT 

barred, Copies ol a claim TOWNSHIP, In the County 

i Ingleslde- 1 bdrm, w/2 c. filed with the Clerk must ol LAKE, State of Illinois, 

garage & basement. Se- be mailed or delivered to for The Fiscal year begin- 

eluded on priv. Lake Ihe representative and to nlng March 1, 2007, and 
' SlOOO/mo. 847-265-1241 the oltornsy within ten 'ending February 28, 
days alter It has been filed. 
Raymond Elblein 
Isl Daniel K. Sinclair. 
Attorney 



$1,350/mo.+sec. Ten- 
ant pays utiis. (847)336- 
1928 



LONG LAKE 
2 Bedroom, 1 acre 
wooded lot w/lake 



Real Estate 
Services 



6100 




S800. 
847-740-4399 



MCHENRY Fox Riverfront 
with pier, 4 bdrm, 3 bath. 
Rent with possible option 
$2200 mo 815-690-7502 






Vans 



5300 



1996 Chrysler Town & 
1 Country LXI. Loaded, 
leather seats. $2,600./obo 
630-443-9316 



Used Dog/Cat Carriers 
Small $15.00 
Large $30.00 
847-431-2450 

YORKIE 4 yr old female 
Long silky hair. Only 
dog/older Kids. Needs at- 
tention 24/7. $350.00 
630-365-1178 



4x4's 



5350 



1 994 GMC YUKON 
2 Door, Sporty, 4x4. 
Excellent condition, 105K 
New tires, radio, speakers, 
muffler. Remote start. 
Solid, clean vehicle. 
S5.800.00 262-344-3291 



Livestock & 
Supplies 



HAY Round bales 48 tor- 
lal. Delivery possible. $40 
815-236*4400 



4500 

Garage Sales 



1994 GMC Yukon 

Excellent condition, super 
, , Bn i clean. 105K miles, now 
4-loU i radj^ speakers, lires & 

mufller. $5,800.00 

262-914-2147 



BANK FORCLOSURESI 
Homes from $10,0001 1-3 
bedroom available! Repos, 
REOs, FDIC, FSBO, FHA, 
eta These homes must 
sent For Listings Call I- 
800-425-1620 exten-3421 



Real Estate 
Auction 



6150 



Round Lake Beach 
3 bdrm, all appliances, In- STATE OF ILLINOIS 
eludes Washer/Dryer & COUNTY OF LAKE 
lonced back yard. SI 000. 

847-702-526B 



To Share 



7200 



LAND AUCTION 
300 Props Must be Sold! 
Low Down/ E/2 Financing 

FREE CATALOG 

888-263-0438 

www.LANDAUCTION.com 



Houses for 
Sale 



6250 



WONDER LAKE Large 
homo, separate Apt, FE 
prel, $5807mo Incl util, NO 
PETS. 815-653-6256 



Apartments, 
Unfurnished 7250 



FOX LAKE Deluxe 2 bdrm, 
37 Nipperslnk Blvd. Nawly 
refurbished. No pets. 
$795. -81 5*403-9558 

FOX LAKE Extra large 1 
bdrm with dining. Balcony, 
ale. Indry, stor, & heat 
MOVE IN SPECIAL $695 
mo + S399 sec dep. No 
I pets, agent owned. 615*= 
814*3348 



- 

Spring Grove Charming' 
Country home, 3 bdrm., 1 
2.5 bath, LR, parlor, HUGE 
Country krtch., 1" Moor 
laundry, 2 car detached 
gar., small bam w/paslure 
(horse or pony permitted) 
$l350/mo, Sec. Plus 1" 
mo. To move in. Avail 6/1 . 
815-675-4224 

WAUCONDA - 3 bdrm, 1 
bath, c/a, 1 car attach gar, 
2 Irg decks, W/D, w-w car- 
pet. Waterfronl/prvt beach 
rights lo Bangs Lake. 
$1200+ulil + sec, avail 6/1. 
847-526-1565 



2008, will be on file and 
conveniently available to 
public inspection at VIL- 
! LAGE HALL OF 
WADSWOTH - 14155 
Wadsworth Road, 

1 Wadsworth from and alter 
1 12:00 o'clock P.M. Friday, 
1 April 27, 2007. 

Notice is further given 
hereby that a public hear- 
ing on said Budget and 
Appropriation Ordinance 
will be held at 7:15 o'clock 
P.M. Wednesday, May 30, 
2007, at VILLAGE HALL 
OF WADSWORTH In this 
NEWPORT TOWNSHIP 
And that Final hearing and 
action on Ihis ordinance 
will bo takon at a mealing 
,to be Held at VILLAGE 
HALL OF WADSWORTH, 
at 7;30 o'clock P.M. 
Wednesday, May 30,2007. 
Daled this 26lh day of 
IN THE MATTER OF THE April, 2005 



Daniel K. Sinclair 
Attorney for Petitioner 
4170 Old Grand Avenue 
Gumee.IL 60031 
847-360-1200 
(Published in the Gunee t 
Wadsworth Journal, April 
20.27&Mav4.2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 



before mo by tho person(s) 
Intending to conduct tho 
businoss this 11th day ol 
April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

is/ Linda M. Paulson 

Notary Public 

Received; April 11. 2007 

Willard R. Hotandor 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published in Iho Loka 

County Journals, April 20, 

27&Mav4,2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name ol Businoss: 
BONFJRE VENDING 

Nalura/Purpose: 
Drink, snack, candy & 
other vending machines 

Address(es) where busi- 
ness is lo be conducted or 
transacted In this county: 
36211 N. Grandwood Dr., 
Gumce, IL 60031, 847- 
245-3351 

Namo(s) and post ollice 
or residence address(es) 
of the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Robert Leo Harnden II, 
36211 N. Grandwood Dr., 
Gumeo, IL 60031, 847- 
245-3351 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to cortily that the 

undersigned Intend(s) to 

conduct the abovo named 

business Irom the location 

: (s) indicated and that tho 

Michael J. Grant, 35075 1 W*- le B«» '*"• ■■«■■■ t«) 
N. Milwaukee Ave., Ingle- 10 ' «■» P 9rson < s > ownina - 



Assumed Name 
8200 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 



Ser- 



Nameol Business: 
Acorn Consulting 
vices 

Nature/Purpose: 
Environmental Consult- 
ing / Home Inspections 

Address(es) where busi- 
noss Is to be conducted or 
transacted In this county: 
35075 N. Milwaukee Ave., 
Ingleslde, IL 60041 847- 
970-0546 

Name(s) and post office 
or residence addross(es) 
of the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 



side, IL 60041 847-970 
0546 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 

COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is lo certify that the 

undersigned intend(s) to 

conduct Iho above named 



conducting or transacting 
the business is/are correct 
as shown, 

/s/ Robert Harnden 
April 16, 2007 
The loregoing Instru- 
ment was acknowledged 



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 

OF THE NINETEEHTO 

JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 

LAKE COUNTY 

IN PROBATE 



business from the location belore me by Iho persons) 
(s) indicated and that tho "ntonding to conduct the 
title and legal lull name(s) . ^Jiess this 16th day ol 
ol tho porsonEs) owning, * p ,Z0 ° hr-ciriAi <-.pai 
conducting or transacting , . n ,.,-.? ■ 

the busings is/are correct & Bs ' b ™ J - Nostw 

Notary Public 

Received: April 16, 2007 

Willard R, Heiander 

Lake Counly Clerk 



Boats & Marine 
Services 5450 



1960's 6 HP, Johnson 
Sea King. Boat Motor. 
$99.00 615-923-1111 



Gurnee Sales 



199S 22' CREST 
PONTOON 

2001 50HP Merc. Newer 
A (inn upholstery, good condition I 
* uo : $4,200 or trade 847-497- 
'9065 or 630-440-4542 



Annual HUGE 

Subdivision Sale 
Sfonebrook Estates 

April 26", 27- & 28" 

9-4 

Grand south on Hunt 

Club, west on Foxworth 

or Grand south on- 

Stonebrook near 

Dominicks. 

Don't Miss IT1 



57" Annual Spring 

RUMMAGE SALE 

SAT. MAY 5 

7am -4pm 

1" Presbyterian 

Church 

700 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Lake Forest, IL 

Clothing, toys, jewelry. 

Housewares, Sports, 

Treasures", Garden, our 

famous French room, 

Furniture & more! NEW 

Dopts. this year for 

better dothing-men. 

women, Icons. 
Credit cards accepted. 
All proceeds go to local 

charities, 
www, Istprosllaimmano.ofa 



Transportation 



Auto Parts & 
Supplies 5100 

1984 Mustang Convertible 
GT..VB, Auto, 72000 miles 
White w/ white top. 
52500,00 630-781-2430 



1999 Bay! I nor 175 Capri, 
135 HP Mercruiser I/O 
stem drive stereo, extra 
prop,+boat covers. Exe. 
Cond. S7500262-81 2-3474 

Pontoon 20' Lowe, Great 
shape w/Seabird Trailer, 
Evinrude 75 HP w/powor 
till & trim $6000 

847-209-1235 

SHORE MASTER Shore 
Station, holds 3,600 lbs. 
Exe cond. $3000. B15- 
444*8744 or 81 5-575-485B 



All Terrain Vehicles 
5500 



1996 Honda CR125, 
1989 Honda CR125R 

Bolh bikes modified, 
S2700.00 Trailer Included. 
815-341-4008 



Campers, Trailers 
& RVs 5650 



1997 35 ft QUAIL RIDGE 
Park Model with a full add 
on edition on a great sea- 
sonal site Less than 2 
hours away Now $25,995 
Stock # 2007-08 
See this unit & more 
parkmodelsonsito.com 
Lakeland Camping 
Resort, Milton, Wf 
608-86 6-4700 



Motorcycles 5700 

1977.H.D. Sportster 

XLH Runs well, many 
new pads, newer paint job, 
$5000 773-45B-3292-Cell 



BECOME A HOMEOWN 
ER 100% /LOW DOWN 
Prior Bankruptcy OK. 
No Minimum Credit Score. 
GREAT RATES. Apply © 
www.wykolfmortgage.com 

conv/va/fhaAjsda 

Purchase or Refinance 

883-833-2181 
ILRes.Mlg.Llc.EHL 

FOX LAKE Pistakee Lake 

Channel Front 2 bdrm 1 

bath ranch. $235,000 

jeanfl WoMovoHomos.com 

Jean Steflens 

Realty Executives 

On The Move 

647-707-3940 

Fox Rfver Grove-Counfy 
Taxes.- 3 bdrm 2.5 bath, 
open kitchen LRm, & 
DRm,. Finished bsmt w/full 
bath & walk-In closet. 2 
car attach, gar. Irg deck & 
patio overlooking wooded 
comer lot. $299,500 847- 
658-8405 

GURNEE 5 bdrm 2.5 bath, 

2 car gar. Backyard opens 
lo lake. Beautiful deck. 
Gorgeous sunny LR & 
kitchen. $2,400 mo. 847- 
275-726B 

LAKE VILLA, Rent lo 
Buy Option 6 bdrm, 3.5 
baths, frplc, 3 car gar., fin'd 
bsmt Avail 5/1. $299,000 

(047)338-1466/336-7813 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

3 bdrm, new carpet, paint, 
plumbing. Move right inl 
$125,000,647-693*0913 

Woodstock - Beautilul 

brick custom designed 
walk out ranch on 2 wood- 
ed acres. Granite kilch, 
hdwd & ceramic II. Custom 
cab. & woodworking. 4 
bdrm, 3.5 baths 3 frpL 
Office, theatre room, 
kitchenette, (2) 2c Att. 
Garages $598,000 
Shown by appointment. , 
815-646-2356 



Condos/Townhomes 
For Sale 6300 



Florida-Fort Lauderdale 
2 bdrm 2 balh condo, 
beautifully remodeled 
Move In or keep It rented 
$2 1 6,000oa 847-293-2000 




FOX LAKE 

Lakefront Apartments 
847-973-9774 




Comm. Property 
For Rent 7500 



LAKE VILLA 
Bar for lease, apartment 
above. Great location, ma- 
jor Lake Villa intersection. 
Avail April. 847-838-5401 



ESTATE OF HERBERT C. 
SCHULTZ, DECEASED 

NO 07 P 239 

CLAIM NOTICE 

NOTICE IS GIVEN OF 
THE DEATH OF HER- 
BERT C. SCHULTZ of 
Wauconda, Illinois. Letters 
of Offico were issued on- ! 
April 13, 2007, to 
MATTHEW A. SCHULTZ, 
2819 W. Park Lane, Gary, 
IL 60013, whose attorney 
is James W, Kaiser, Esq., 
121 East Liberty Street, 
Ste. 3, Wauconda. IL 
60084. 



Retail/OfficcSpace 
For Rent 



Claims against the Es- 
tate may bo filed in tho Ol- 
lice ol the Clerk of Court at 
17 N. County Street, 
Waukegan, IL or with tho 
7550 representative, or both, 
within six (6) months from 
the date of Issuance of let- 
MCHENRY Rl. 31 & Bull ! ters and any claim not filed 
Valley Road. Brand new | wilhin that period Is barred 



/s/ Michelle Eymer 
Clerk 

(Published in the Gumee / 
wadsworth Journal, April 
27.2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE 

TO: Last Known Address: 

Tim Flanagan 

226 S. River Rd. 

Fox River Grove, IL 60021 

Your right to use 
space 342 at Wauconda 
Self-Service Storage, 500 
Rand Rd., Wauconda, IL 
60084 has terminated and 
you no longer have access 
to the stored property. DE- 
MAND FOR PAYMENT IS 
BEING MADE WfTHIN 14 
DAYS. The stored property 
Is subject to a Hen In the 
amount ol 5419. This 
amount will continue to In- 
crease In accordance with ] 
the terms of your rental 
agreement until paid or the I 
property Is sold. They are 



as shown. 

/s/ Michael Grant 
April 4, 2007 
The foregoing instru- , 
ment was acknowledged ■ published in the Lako 
boforo me by the person(s) ?«?# ^™ate. April 20, 



OFFICIAL SEAL! 
/s/ Linda M. Paulson 
Notary Public 
Received: April 4. 2007 
Willard R. Heiander | 
Lake County Clerk 1 
(Published in the Lake 
County Journals, April 13, 
20 & 27 2007.) 



27&Mav4.20O7.) 



Assumed Name 

8200 



noss is to bo conducted or 
transacted in this county: 
1200 Darnell Drive, 
Mundclcin, II 60000-1084, 
847-970-9160 

Nomo(s) and post ollice 
or rosidonco address(os) 
ol Iho porson(s) owning. 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Susan R. Mnrkgral, 1200 
Darnel! Drive, Mundclcin, 
IL 60060, 847-970-9160; 
Cynthia N. Greenwood, 
524 Pollon Avenue, Ar- 
lington Heights, IL 
60005, 847-404-8404 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This is lo cortily that Iho 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct Iho abovo named 
businoss Irom tho location 
(s) indicated and lhat iho 
true and logal lull nnme(s) 
ol tho potson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
Iho business Is/arc correct 
as shown. 

IsJ Susan R Mnrkgral 
April 23. 2007 
Isl Cynthia N. Greenwood 
Apr.1 23, 2007 
The loregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
belore mo by Iho porson(s) 
intending to conduct tho 
business this 23rd day ot 
April, 2007, 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/Jockio Flick 

Notary Public 

Received: April 23, 2007 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published In tho Lake 

County Journals. April 27, 

Mav4& 11.2007.1 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Namo ol Business: 
J.C, Photography 

Nalure/Purposo: 
Candid capture ol 
events, portraiture & 
photographic nota cards 
& prints 

Addross(es) whero busi- 
ness is to bo conducted or 
transacted in this county; 
309 Terra Springs Cr., 
Volo, IL 60020, 847-231- 
3069 

Namo(s) and post offico 
or residence address(cs) 
ot the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Jennl Chase, 309 Terra 
Springs Cr., Volo, IL 
60020, 847-254-508G 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This Is to certify that the 
undersigned intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business irom the location 
(s) indicated and that the 
Irue and legal full name(s) 
of the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
tho businoss Is/aro correct 
as shown. 

Is/ Jennl Lee Chase 
March 21, 2007 
Tho foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by tho person(s) 
intending lo conduct tho 
business this 21st day ol 
March. 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/s/ Isabel A. Avakian 

Notary Public 

Received: April 3, 2007 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published in the Lako 

County Journals, April 13, 

?n A ?7 ?007 1 



PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE 



ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 



1600 sq It ollice space 
S1000/mo. 815-759-5000 



FOX LAKE - Vacation 

Village 2 bdrm, 24 hour 
guarded community Incl 
pool & beach, $750/mo, 
1 mo sec req, avail 5/15 
847-525-2841 - 



Grayslake /Wildwood 
Min. to Gumee Mills 

On Gages Lk Rd. and 

I-94.2ERM20 

1BR$B25l"mo$1 

hid. Parking avail 

2BR 1.5 bath $975 

Gar. Laundry, Elev. 

tGLR.E. 847-548-5100 




ter It has been filed. 
(Published In (he Waucon- 
da Journal, April 20. 27 & 
Mav4.2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

Notice Is hereby given 
that Roberts Road Mini 
. Storage, 4015 Roberts 
PUBLIC NOTICE Rd., Island Lake, IL 60042 



Copies ol a claim filed with itemized as follows: 
the Clerk must be mailed Date: 3/5/07; Rent j 
or dotivered to tho repre- -W*.' U* 
6entative and lo tho attor- 
ney within ten (10) days a!- 




www.mchonrvoounlvBporto.rawn 
Local Sports Attitude. 



McHenry Great Location! 
Spacious, dean & cute. 
1 or 2 bdrm by Riverwalk, 
1 bdrm $715/2 bdrm $835 
+ sec dep. 815-814-4763 

SCHAUMBURG - 1 bdrm, 
New kitchen, new carpel, 
security bldg., pool, tennis, 
near Elgin -O'Haro & Irving 
Park. $750/mo. Availablo 
May 1*. 630-668-4259 

j Wauconda Downtown 
1 bdrm $585 avail now, 2 
I bdrm S795, avail May 1". 
847-650-4998 

ZION Large 1 bdrm, eat-in 
kitchen, tenant pays elec- 
tric, will furnish for military, 
off St parking, $60Q7mo, 
availablo Immediately. 
847-212-7757 



CondoBfTownhomes 
For Rent 7300 



FOX LAKE Spacious 2 
bdrm Condo In Vacation 
Village gated wilh pool, 
tennis, on the lake, 
SBOO/mo. 847-502-8251 



NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

LINCOLNSHIRE-PRAIRIE 
VIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT 

#103 



The Board of Education 
ol the Uncolnshlre-Pralrie 
View School District #103, 
Lake County, Lincolnshire, 
Illinois, will receive sealed 
bids until 9:00 AM local 
time, May 14, 2007 In the 
, Business Ollice,' 1370 
Rivorwoods Road, Lin 
■ colnshire, 

1 2007-08 Operational Ser- 
vices to include Disposal 
I Services and Copy Paper, 

i 



will sell or dispose of prop- 
erty. The sale will take 
place on Saturday, May 
12, 2007 al 10:30 a.m. for 
units K208 Said Zamudio, 
#302 Michael 
#405 Michael 



ventory: $30; Due Date: 
3/5/07; Balance: $919. 

Oate: 4/16/07; Rent 
$380; Late Fee; $9; Inven- 
tory; $30; Due Date: 
4/2/07; Balance: $419. 
TOTAL DUE: $419.00 
THIS SUM MUST BE 
PAID IN PULL BEFORE] 
4/16/07 OR THE PROP- 
ERTY WILL BE ADVER- 
TISED. FOR SALE AND [ 
SOLD. Any excess pro- 
ceeds of the sale over the 
lien amount and costs of 
sale will be retained by the 
owner and may be re- 
claimed by you, or claimed 
Manieiia', bv another person having 
McKeoa ! a cou ' 1 order or otner l uti ' 



#609 JaTme Stephen," ifSiB I clal process against Iho 

Steve Domantey, (11011 property, ,at any time for a 

i period ol 2 years from the 

sale and thereafter the 



Domantey, 

James Lorek, and #1201 

Lauren Daly. All contents 

sold to highest bidder for 

cash. Immediate removal 

required, We reserve the 

right to withdraw any or all 

L-r-Sta-t-l Vh n a " I property prior to sale. 
Illinois for the K, u ^ K d In ^ 

wauconda Journal, April 
20 & 27, 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 



At 9:00 AM, ail bids lhat 
'are received will be pub-, 
lidy opened and read i 
aloud In the Business Of- j 
flea. 

All prospective bidders 
j are required to review said 
I specifications and require- 
ments prior 10 submitting 
their bid. Bid specifica- 
tions may be obtained 
through the Business Of- 
fice, 1370 Riverwoods 
Road, Lincolnshire, Illinois 
60069. 

Bids must be submitted 
on the forms provided by 
Iho district, 

All bids must bo accom- 
panied by Certificates of 
Insurance and such other 
documents as required In 

IhA r-i-v-lfl-~~itl'--ir 



STATE OF MICHIGAN 
JUDICIAL DISTRICT 

5TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 
COUNTY PROBATE 

ORDER FOR 
ALTERNATE SERVICE 

CASE NO. ' 
2007-0695-DC-N 

Kevin Knox, 511 Renais- 
sance Drive, Suite 110, St. 
Joseph, Ml 490B5 

Plaintiff. 

v. 
Dlanna Koenig, 302 N. 
Waukegan Road, Lake 
Bluff. IL 60044, 

Delendant. 

TO: DIANNA KOENIG 

You are being sued by 
Plalnlill In this Court to ob- 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Named Business: 
ALL ABOUT POOLS 

Nature/Purpose; 
Pool Repair 

Addressf.es) where busi- 
ness Is to be conducted or 
transacted In this counly: 
100 N. RL 21, Gurnee, IL 
60031,224-610-0299 

Name(s) and post ollice 
or residence address(es) 
o1 Ihe person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Edwin S. Rider, 100 N. 
RL21, Gumee, IL 80031, 
224-610-0299 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is to certify that tho 
undersigned lntend[s) to 
conduct the above named 
business from the location 
(s) indicated and lhat Ihe 
(rue and legal full name(s) 
ol the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
Ihe business is/are correct 
as shown, 

Isl Edwin S. Rider 
Apr313, 2007 

The loregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
belore me by Ihe person(s) 
Intending to conduct the 



Name ol Business: 
CUSTOM CABINET CON- 
CEPTS 

Nature/Purpose: 
Wood working 

Addres5(es) where busi- 
ness is to be conducted or 
transacted In this county: 
1214 Cedar Lake Rd., 
Lake Villa, IL 60046, 847- 
356-0125 

Name(s) and post oifico 

or residence address(es) 

ol Ihe person(s) owning, 

conducting or transacting 

i business: 

Jolfrey Hopkins, 1214 
Cedar Lake Rd,, Lake Vil- 
la, IL 60046, 847-356-1 
1 0125 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is lo certify that tho 
I undersigned Intend(s) to 
conduct the above named 
business tram the location 
(s) indicated and thai Ihe 
true and legal full namo(s) 
of Ihe porson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

Isl Jeffrey Hopkins 
April 10. 2007 

The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged, 
before me by the porson(s) 
intending lo conduct the 
businoss this 10th day of 
April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Linda M. Paulson 

Notary Public 

Received: April 10, 2007 
Willard R. Heiander 
Lake County Clerk 



business this 13lh day of \ (Published in the Lake 



proceeds will revert to 
Wauconda Self-Service 
Storage. 

General description of 
goods: Schlage locks, 
dishwasher, 2 ladders, fish 
tank, misc. household 
electrical supplies. 

Date and location ol 
sale: 5/7/07 at 1:00 p.m. At 
Wauconda Sell-Service 
Storage, P.O. Box 505, 
500 Rand Rd., Wauconda, 
IL 60084. 

You may pay this sum 
and may contact tho own- 
er al 847-526-5055. 

Isl George Gallagher 

4/2/07 

(Published In Ihe 

Wauconda Journal, 

inril?n*-'7.?rV17t. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 

HEARING ON 
TOWNSHIP BUDGET 

Notice Is hereby given 
that a Tentative Budge 
and Appropriation On" 
nance for Iho Town 
NEWPORT TOWNSHI 
In the County ol LAK 



April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Paulette Lyons 

Nolary Public 

Received: April 17, 2007 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published In the Lake 

County Journals, April 27, 

May4&11,2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 



County Journals, April 20, 
27 8.Mav4.2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE ! PUBLIC NOTICE 



ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name ol Business: 
KEEL APPRAISAL SER- 
VICES 

Nature/Purpose: 
Real Estate Appraisal - 
Single Family 

Address(os) where busi- 
ness Is to bo conducted or 
transacted In Ihis county: 
1822 Neuway Ln„ Anti- 
och, IL 60O02, 847-603- 
1264 

Name(s) and post oflice 
or residence address(es) 
ol the person(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Mary K. Keel, 1822 
Neuway Ln„ Antioch, IL 
60002.847-603-1264 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This is lo certify that Ihe 
undesigned intond(s) to 
conduct tho abovo named 
businoss from Ihe location 
(s) Indicated and that ihe 
true and logal full name(s) 
of the porson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
Ihe businoss Is/are correct 
as shown. 

Isl Mary K. Keel 
April 7, 2007 

The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by Iho porson(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this 7lh day ol 
April, 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Connie Urranik 

Notary Public 

Received: April 10, 2007 

Willard R. Heiander 

Lake County Clerk 

(Published in the Lake 

County Journals, April 20, 

27&Mav4.2007.) 



ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name of Businoss: 
GraenMark Public Rela- 
tions 

Nature/Purpose: 
Public and media rela- 
tions, marketing 

Address(es) where busi- 



ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name of Business: 
MelComm 

Nature/Purpose: 
Construction Consulting 
Communication 

Address(es) whero busi- 
ness Is lo be conduclod or 




m 



1-800-DONATE-CARS 



Heritage 

fortheBHnd 



1 The donation Is tax deductible, 

■ Pick-up Is free 

1 We take care of all the paperwork. 



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C6- Friday, April 27, 2007 



CLASSIFIED 



Lake County Journals / lakecountyjournals.com 



1/ 



Assumed Name. 

8200 



Assumed Name 
• B200 



Assumed Name 
8200 



Assumed Nnmc 
8200 



Promotions 






Ihero Is a now group or We'll pnnt & distribute over 
pooplo ovory day, looking 280,000 copios of your ad 
8500 ' or o doal in Journal Clos- ovory wookl Journal Clas- 
sified (800)589-8237. sitied (800)589-8237. 



transacted in (his county: 
100 Lincoln wood CI., 
Spring Grove, IL 60081, 
847-366-1267 

Namo(s) and post olfico 
or rosldonco oddress(os) 
ol the porson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Mollau Wllhelm, 100 
Llncolnwood Ct„ Spring 
Grove, IL 60081, 847-366- 
1267 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This Is to comfy that the 
undersigned intond(s) to 
conduct iho above named 
business from Iho location 
(a) indicated and that Iho 
Iruo and legal full namo(s) 
ol the porson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
Iho business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/ Melissa Wilholm 
Apnl5,2007 
The lorogoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
beloro me by the porson(s) 
intending to conduct the 
business this 5th day ol Apnl, 2007 
April. 2007. OFFICIAL SEAL 

OFFICIAL SEAL ft/Claudia M. Conway 
Isl Barbara J, Nostor Notary Public 

Notary Public ficvoWH- 4nnt jn win? 
Received: April 5. 2007 
Wiliard R. Helander 
Lako County Ctork 
(Published in the Lako 
County Journals, April 13. 
20 A 27 2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Name ol Business: 
RJBSP0RTSCARD5 

Nature/Purpose: 
Retail sales ot sports- 
cards via the Intemol 

Addross(os) whore busi- 
ness is lo bo conducted or 
transacted in this county: 



447 N. Carlisle Ct„ 
Round Lako, IL 60073, 
847-201-8518 

Namo(s) and post olfico 
or residence addross{03) 
of the porson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
business: 

Richard Baldauf, 447 N. 
Carlisle CI,, Round Lako, 
IL 60073, 847-201-8518 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This Is lo certify that the 
undersigned Intcnd(s) to 
conduct iho above named 
business from tho location 
(s) indicated and that the 
true and legal full namo(s) 
ol tho porson(s) owning, 
conducting or transacting 
tho business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

Isl Richard Baldauf 
April 20, 2007 
Tho lorogoing Inslru- conducting or transacting 
monl was acknowledged business: 
boforomobythoporson(s) Richard A. Diamond, 
intending to conduct tho 27709 Grass Lake Dr., 
business this 20lh day of Spring Grove. IL 60081, 
847-356-9500 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 
This is to cord I y that tho 
iinriflfsmnnrt Irrtwirffnl In 



Wiliard R. Helander conduct the above named 
Lake County Clerk business from Iho location 
(Published In the LakB (s) Indicated and thai tho 



County Journals. April 27, 
May4& 11.2007.) 

PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME APPLICATION 

Narrie ol Business: 
WWW.REALESTATEAUC 
TIONACCESS.COM 

Naturo/Purposo: 
Internet Auction Site 

Addross(os) where busi- 
ness Is to be conducted or 
transacted In this county: 
27709 Grass Lako Dr., 
Spring Grove, IL 60081, 
847-356-9500 

Nnmo(s) and post office 
or residence address(os) 
ol the person (s) owning. 



Iruo and legal full name(s) 
of Iho porson(s) owning. 
conducting or transacting 
the business Is/are correct 
as shown, 

Jsl Richard A, Diamond 
March 29, 2007 
Tho loregolng instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
boforo mo by Iho porson(s) 
intending lo conduct Uio 
business this 29th day of 
March. 2007. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Isl Linda Torres 

Notary Public 

Received: April 2, 2007 

Wiliard R. Helander 

Lako County Clerk 

(Published in Iho Lako 

County Journals, April 13, 

20 & 27 2007.) 



Dry-In Shell packages. 
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I Employment 

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According to Iho Newspa- 
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newspapers aro their prin- 
ciple information source, 
compared lo 15% who cite 
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you've got It covcrodl To 
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According to the Newspa- 
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job changers said they 
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OURNALS 



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Lake County Journals / lakecountyjoumals.com 



CLASSIFIED 



Friday, April 27, 2007 • C7 



I LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 
- ■ 



EMPLOYMENT 



A partner of 

chicagojobsT^om 



{ 



3000 

Employment 



Work From Home 
3550 



Secret Shoppors Needed 
For Storo Evaluations. Gel 
Paid to Shop. Local Stores 
Restaurants and Theaters. 
Flexible Hours, Training 
Providod, Email Roqulrea. 
(-B00-5B5-9O24 ext.6533 



General, FT 3400 



Administrative/ 
Customer Service 

CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

REPRESENTATIVE 



Slack- On Products, a 
leading manufacturer of 
toolboxes, cabinets, gun 
safes, and garage stor- 
age has an opportunity 
available (or a Customer 
Service Representative 
for our office In Waucon- 
da, IL. This position will 
oversee lor a wide 
range ol responsibilities 
related to all product 
lines and have inlemal 
and external customer 
contact via phone, fax 
and Internet as well as 
interoffice communica- 
tions with Engineering, 
Purchasing, Shipping 
and Tralhc Depart 
rnenls. 

Interest ed Individuals 
aro required to hava el' 
(octive communication 
skills. Reasoning, math 
ematics and keyboard 
skills, both typewriter 
and computer, required. 
Ability lo work indopen 
donlly with limited su- 
pervision. Excel skills a 
plus. 

We olfer a highly com- 
petitive salary and bene- 
lits package. Qualified 
candidates can submit 
their resume with salary 
requirements to: 

Stack-On 
Products 

1360 N. Old Rand Road 

P.O. Sox 489 

Wauconda IL 60084 

Attn: Human Resources WK 

Fax: B47-526-7668 

www.stack-on.com 

Directs Only 

We are an 

Equal Employment 

Opportunity Employer 



Agriculture 

Premier perennial produc- 
tion facility seeking quality 
Full Time Grower/Assis- 
tant Grower, Horticultural 
knowledge & experience 
preferred. Compensation 
based on experience/edu- 
calion. Bi-iingual a plus. 
An expanding, dynamic 
company with long term 
opportunities. 

Call 847-663-7012 

ext. 224 or email: 

groweropportunlty@ 

yahoo.com 

BOOKKEEPER 

Sound X is seeking a 
B ookkoe po r for i m mod into 

FT/PT employment. 
Contact Nick © 

847-370-2942 or lax 
resume to 847-382-3917 



^cncrnl.FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, FT 3400 General, FT 3100 



Customer 
Service 
Manager 

We are seeking a 
customer service 
fanatic with strong, 
positive energy lo 
load our staff and 
provide superior 
service to our na- 
tional customer 
base. BS or Asso- 
ciates degree Is re- 
quired as Is 5 years 
+ in a manufactur- 
ing CS role along 
with 2 or more 
years In a CS lead- 
ership role. Musi 
have working 

knowledge of ERP 
systems (SAP, Ora 
cfe, PeopteSott, or 
J.O. Edwards), 

You can sea more 
about us at: 

www.seaqulst 
perfect.com 

If you have the can 

do altitude and CS 

skills we seek, 

please send your 

resume to us at: 

AD.mail@spdus.com 



Seaqulsl Perfect 
Dispensing 

1 160 N. Silver Lake Rd. 
Gary. !L 60013 
EOE F/M/H/V 



DRIVER 

Class A CDL 
Local Delivery Driver 

Homo Nightly 

Shaw Industries Inc., a 
subsidiary ol Berkshire 
Hathaway Inc., currently 
soeks exp'd. Cfass A CDL 
Local Delivery Driver In 
Elgin, IL. 

Requires: 

■ Cloan driving record & 

MVR 
•Pro-omploymcnldrug 

screen & DOT physical 
• 2 years verifiable tractor 

trailer driving oxp. within 

last 3 years 
•Class A CDL 

We oiler: Competitive pay 
rate 521.41/hr; 401 K; Rx 
plan, vision discount plan, 
mcdical/dentat/lile insur- 
ance & more. 

Please apply In person be- 
tween the hours ol 8am- 
4pm at 2410 Galvln Drive, 
Elgin. IL 60123. 

www.shawtloors.com 

AA/EEO Employer. 
M/F/D/V 

Driver 

Construction Truck 
Driver/Laborer 
60+ hrs weekly. Salary 
comm w/exp. Send 
replies to Box 96 do 
NorthWest News Group 
PO Box 250, Crystal 
Lake, IL 60039-0250 



Driver 
SSA Career Hero Only 

Makes CentsSS 

OTR Drivers. Pre-pass 

EZ-pass. Every 60K mile 

raises. Newer equipment 

100% NO touch. 

BUTLER TRANSPORT 

1-B00-528-787S 

www.metionrycounlyspons.com 
Local Sports Attitude. 

Looking for a 
Career Change? 
According to the Newspa- 
per Association ol Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 of all 
job changers said they 
were still checking ads In 
newspapers, and half that 
number had been consult- 
ing online employment ads 
since their job change. 
Wilh the Journal Employ- 
ment section and Chicago- 
Jobs. com. you've got It 



Driver 

Exp, dependable tractor 
trailer driver tor pro-casl 
concrete mlr. CDL, 
good and verifiable 
record req. Spydcr exp 
a plus. Apply In person 
only M-F: 

Americas! Concrete 

Products Corp 
144Q0 Washington St 

Woodstock IL EOE 

DRIVER 

Experienced FT Tow 

Truck Driver needed. 
Call Mark 815-355-1027 

DRIVER 

Mack 6-wheeler & semi 
exp only. Island Lake 
Herron Topsoil 
Call 847-526-8500 

Driver Run Close to Homel 
S.45/mil Exc Miles! Home 



covered! To conned wilh Weekly!- New Equipment! 
qualified candidates, call 
(800) 589-8237 today. 



j Employment 

Look No 
Further! 

According lo the Newspa- 
per Association of Ameri- 
ca. 47% ol job seekers say 
newspapers are their prin- 
ciple information source, 
compared to 1 5% who cito 
online sources. Wilh the 
Journal Employment sec- 
lion & ChlcagoJobs.com, 
you've got it covered To 



Btuo Cross / Blue Shiefdl 
DentaMOIKlEZ Pass/Toll 
Cardsl HEARTLAND EX- 
PRESS 1-800-441-4953 
www.heartlandexpross.com 



Driven 

DONT JUST START 
YOUR CAREER, START 
IT RIGHT! Co. Sponsored 
CDL training in 3 weeks. 
Must bo 21. Have CDL? 
Tuition Reimbursement! 

CRST 866-9 17-2778 

WE'VE GOT ITI 

Journal Classified. 



DRIVER: TOW TRUCK 

FTPT. Exp prof, will 
train right poison. Musi 
havo good MVR, Cfass 
Cover 23. 

847-3B1-0770 

Drivers 

Class A CDL Drivers Re- 
gional Runs. High Weekly 
Miles! Excellent Pay and 
Bonolils SIOOO Sign On 
Sonus (training available) 
Toll Free: 88B-343-6C01 
www.mikGbrookslnc.com 

Drivers 

Driving School graduates 
wanted. Tuilion reimburse- 
manl. No wailing lor train- 
ers. Passenger policy. No 
NYC. Guaranteed homo- 
time. Dedicated & regional. 
USA Truck B66-483-3413 

Drivers Top Pay S.47 mile 
Includes $.03 bonus. 
Home weekly. Paid orien- 
tation. BCBS insurance. 
low premiums. Class A 
CDLreq'd. 860-804-9222 
www.transporlamorfca.com 

DRIVERS WANTED 



) DEDICATED 
ROUTES 



* $1 ,0 00/wk guaranteed 

(lirst four weeks) 
•32 CPM/S170 unload 
•Weekends oil 
•Great bonefils 

Class-ACDLroq.CDL 

grads wanted. Open Sun. 

866-475-3621 



U.S. XPRESS 



www.xprossdrlvers.com 

Drivors...ASAPII 
21 CDL Drivers Needed 
"36-43 CPM/S1.20" Sign- 
On Bonus, SO Lease, Now 
Trucks, Only 3 months 
OTRreq'd. 800-635-6669 

DRIVERS: Co & O/OP's 
Great Pay / Benolits! 

Good Homettmel 

Lois ol Miles/ All Pd. 

CDL-A 2 yrs. oxp. 

800-831-4032 

Education 

Childtimo Learning 

Centers seeks 

2 Full Time and 2 Part 

Time Teachers 

for our McHenry center. 

Req's: Associate degree 

in ECEorSO credit hrs 

ol 6 credit hours in ECE. 

We olfer a competitive 

salary & benefits pkg. 

Call Marge at 
815-363-2356 or fax 
resume 815-363-4790. 
.•;. ; EOE ... 

Rental Facts 

Most renters consider 
rental rates, floor plans, 
and location the most Im- 
portant items of informa- 
tion In o rental ad. Rent 
your property lastor with 
help (rem a Journal Classi- 
fied representative. Call 
(600) 589-8237 today. 



Electrical 

ELECTRICIAN 

Switchboard mechanic 
with control pane 1 wiring 
oxporionco. Working 
Irom schemalics & 
blueprints. 
Benolits, bonus, 401 K. 

—Apply to:— 

Kfnney Eleclrlcal Mtg 

678 Buckeye St. Elgin, 

Fax resume to: 

847-742-9601 

FITNESS 

American Fllnoss Center Is 
now accepting applications 
lor Certified Personal 
Trainers. Applications are 
available at our reception 
desk or contact Lisa 
Shnnahan at 847-587- 
8494. Resume may bo 
faxed to 847-587-8485. 
American Fitness Center 
Inglosido, IL 

Food Service 
DIETARY COOK 

Evening Shift 
Crystal Pines is current- 
ly seeking a FT Dlestary 
Cook on the ovening 
shift Apply in person, 
M-F, 8-4. 335 N Illinois 
St, Crystal Lake. 
B1 5-459-7791 



General 

YMCAof 
McHenry County 

Is hiring 
Camp Counselors, 
Teachers, Swim Instruc- 
tors, Life Guards, Be- 
fore & Alter School, 
Courtesy Desk, & Build- 
ing Supervisor. 
Apply In person at 
701 Manor Rd, Crystal 
Lake - 815-459-4455 

Human Resources 
Secretary 



Installers 

PRIDE 

ADVENTURE 

WINNING 

You solvo problems quick- 
ly. You havo a strong work 
othlc and lochnical know 
how. You're Independent, 
yet you can easily collabo- 
rate. You probably have as 
many great qualities to 
bring to the table as ws 
have channels. Wo'ro 
EchoStor's DISH Network. 
Wo'ro also the supplier of 
Iho most DVRs In tire 
wortd. wilh 500 TV chan- 
nels, plus Sinus satellite 
radio. And I! you think wo 
have a lot on iho menu for 
our 13+ million customers, 
just wail till you see how 
we treat our 22,000 em- 
ployees. Wo nro currently 
seeking Satollito TV In- 
stallers in NAPERVILLE, 
IL 

Satellite TV 
Installers 

You'll also receive: 
•Highly Competitive Houily 
Wages plus Monthfy 
Bonus Based on Perfor- 
mance 

•Paid Training 
•Advancomonl Opportuni- 
ties 

•Free Monthly DISH Pro- 
gramming Service 
•Company Supplied Vehi- 
cle. Tools 8. Uniforms 
•Medical, Dental, Vision 
Insurance 
•Paid Time Ofl 

To quality, you must have 
a valid drivers license with 
a good driving record, bo 
willing lo work flexible 
hours, and possess strong 
technical, customer ser- 
vice, verbal and writing 
skills. The ability to read 
and comprehend technical 
schematics, tech manuals 
and memos Is required. 



INSURANCE 

Build the future you've 
always wanted. 

USAA is a Fortune 200 
company and recently 
awarded "Customer 
Service Champ' by 
Business Week, March 
2007. Wo havo Iho fol- 
lowing opportunity avail- 
able In Iho Chicago 
area: 

Claims Service 
Manager 

USAA Is seeking a ca- 
pable end energetic per- 
son lor a rnro opportuni- 
ty to lead our Midwest 
Homoownor Claims liold 
operation. The Ideal 
candidate will havo a 
minimum 3 years recent 
experience in the nan 
dling and/or leadership 
ol thoso thai work first 
party homoownor 

claims. Knowledge ol 
computer-based est! 
mating systems is a 
must. Experience In a 
muhilmo claims soiling 
Is optimal. Work indo- 
pendonlly Irom your res- 
idence in tho greater 
Chicago area. Direct 
highly skilled and 
tenured group ol claims 
professionals that rosido 
in Chicago, St Louis and 
Minneapolis. Flexible to 
iraval 20% and work 
CAT assignment. Com- 
pany car will be provid- 
ed. Some, relocation as- 
sistance will be provided 
for qualified candidates 
outside of Iho greater 
Chicago area. 

We oiler a highly 

competitive salary end 

impressive bonefils. 

Submit your resumoal 

the Career Center on 

usaa.com; job 1 1635 

«t 

USAA* 



Manufacturing 

MOLD MAKER/TOOL 

MAINTA1NANCE 
SERV-ALLDioCaslmg 
Co. In Crystal Lake 
seeks a qualified full 
time person for mold 
making and tool mainte- 
nance. 5 yrs. Exp. and 
EDM knowledge a plus, 
bcnelils and OT avail- 
able. Plcaso email 
Information to: 
rknnbuschft 
scrv-all.com 

or tax to; 
615-459-8456 



Manufacturing 

Structural Steel 

Fabricator/ 
Layout Person 

Exp roq. Must bo ablo 
lo read & work Irom 
shop drawings. Pass 
MIG and Stick AWS 
tosl. Work OL Foil ben- 
efits. Pay based on oxp. 
Suburban Ironworks 
27W963 Industrial Ave 
Harrington, IL 60010 
Phone:847-381-4900 
Fox: 847-381-0387 




lNE 



TODAY I 



jppty Mon-Fri, 
1707 Quincy 



Stop in and appl; 
6am-5pm at 

Avenue, Unit 163, 
Naperville, IL 60540. EOE 



Must Have 

Human Resource 

Dept. Exp 

Global mfr in Sycamore 
seeks seasoned indiv who 
is detail driven & accurate. 
You will take ownership ol 
all personnel & HR tiles; 
input variety of critical Info 
Into Iho computer and 
HRIS system, coordinate 
candidate scheduling, han- 
dle on-line bkgrd ck. etc. 
Min 7+ yrs exp, solid confi- 
dential data Input & HRIS n ., eDC Ti icecno 
bkgrd, PC prolic. know!- OVEHblUrPtU^ 
edge ol HR regs, benefits Then you should run a 4- 
arena & ADP payroll desir- lino, 7-day power package S17.32-S20.69 per hour to 
able. Highly org. soil , In Journal Classified your start. Phoenix. Arizona. 
stanor-w/ enloy this opplyUtull could bocoma. eomo- 1 Maricopa County SharUla 
in a great working environ, one elses treasure. Call r • ' 

Send resume Word For- (800) 589-8237 today! 
mat only: Visa, Mastercard, and DIs- 

Searchecmcconsult.com I cover accepted. 



www.dishnelwork.com 



Landscaping 

Hortlculturatlst 

Must bo knowledgeable 

in planting and 

maintaining annuals 

and perennials. 

Crystal Lake Country 

Club 815-459-7240 



Law Enlorcemenl 
DETENTION OFFICER: 



Office 

Medical Office 

Wo have on immediate 
opening In tho business 
olfico ol our Lake Coun- 
ly ophthalmology prac- 
tice. Job duties will bo 
split between billing and 
insurance follow up and 
front olfico medical re- 
ceptionist duties. Excel- 
lent communication 
Skills, professionalism 
and computer skills a 
must. Medical office ex- 
perience desired, how- 
ever will train the right 
candidate. Bilingual a 
plus. Competilive salary 
and benefits. 
Fax resume lo Leonor 

Bl 847-244-5122 or 
e-mail to 

lcoleyva@ao1.com 

Olfice 
RECEPTIONIST /SEC 

Wauconda based co wants 
full or part time energetic 
bilingual person lo help an- 
swer phones & general of- 
fice. Great pay & benolits! 
847-526-9082 Eric 

Painters - Experienced 
F/T. Min 3 yrs exp. Call 
between 8 am -Noon 

Grayslako 847-223-0269 
So habla espanol 



j Rcslauranl 

Full Time/Pail Time 
Delivery Drivers & 
Kitchen Workers 

needed lor 
Lou Malnatt's 

Ubertyvillo Local ion 

Call 847-362-6070 

Alter 2pm tor info. 

£ interview 



Safes 

5 Sales Pos Open 

Determined, S Motivated! 

Confidence a Musll 

Daily /Wkly Bonuses 

Plus Hourly Based Pay! 

Training providedl 

McHenry Calf Center 

815-759-5051 

Weekly Journal Wost de- 
livers McHenry County's 
most qualified job seekers. 
Journal Classified (800) 
589-8237. 

Looking for a 
Career Change? 

According lo tho Newspa- 
per Association ol Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 of all 
job changers said (hey 
were still checking ads in 
newspapers, and nail thai 
number had been consult- 
ing online job ads since 
their job change. Wilh Iho 
Journal Employment sec- 
lion and ChicagoJobs.- 
com, youVo got it covered! 
To connect wilh qualified 
candidates, call (BOO) 589- 
8237 today, 



SALES 

Sell subscriptions to tho 

Northwest 

Herald 

in our storo or field 
sales deparlmonl. 

* No experience 
necessary 

* SI 5.00 an hour - 
paid training 

* Excollont commissions 
and Incentives 

* Full-lime and part- 
time hours availnblo 

Coll 

847-330-9400 

Ask for Ashley 

Apply online at: 
www.unllMlclrculollon.com 



SALES 

Has iho housing 
market left you 
standing In the 
unemployment line? 
II you havo experience 
In home sales and a 
good record lor closing 
doals. havo a track 
record of soiling Irom 
blueprints and aro 
skilled in sales tech- 
niques & strategies, we 
want to talk lo you. 
Fax resume 
815-337-1919 or 
email: tami&reschko 
goncralcontractors.com 

Uualiticd buyers don't in- 
vestigate every ad, just the 
ones that oftor a good 
deal. Journal Classified 
(B00J5B9-8237. 








Come join our fast-paced, exciting work 
environment with real opportunity for growlfil 



ASSISTANT 
MANAGERS 

Previous retail or supervisory exp. preferred. 

Musi be ablo lo work flexible shifts, day/evefilng/ 
weekend rotallon. Wcareo jafety-cortsdous workplace 

looking for candidates who value safety and a 
greal work environment. Please forward your resume: 

adibble@blainsupply.com 

www.larmandflcet.tom 
EOE • Tctmcw £ Diug-FrH (nitrornnent • Supporting Fnnilr Voluci 



Olfice.Exc-benefils/No exp 
necessary, contact 1-602- 
307-5245/1 -877-352-6276 
www.mc90.org 400vacon 



OPEN HOUSES 

Watch lor the Journal 
Classified Open House Di- 
rectory every Friday, Sat- 
urday and Sunday. In- 
clude your listing by calling 
(BOO) 589-8237. 



9vi!itf. 



connect with qualified can- j 1800) 580-8237. _ Visa, 
' 589- Mastercard 



didales, call 
8237 today! 



(800) 



Card accepted. 



& Discover 




Cleaning Assistant 
Needed FT7PT. Carpet 
Cleaning. Will train right 
candidate, Must have 
valid D.L. Highland Park 
Coll 847-502-2024 

Customer Service 
••*•••• 

APPOINTMENT 
SETTERS 

Full-Time Or Part Time 
Do you havo good tele- 
phone skills? Are you look- 
ing for an opportunity lo 
make a good income? IPA 
is currently hiring Business 
Coordinators to set ap- 
pointments Irom our Buffa- 
lo Grove offices lor our 
Outside Sales Team. 

• No selling - Just 

' appointment setting 
•Top commissions 

• Earn S40O-S80O per 
week part-ume 

• $1000 per week lull-time 

• Paid Training 

• Advancement 
opportunities 

• Full benefits for full-time 

• Daytime hours - No 
evenings or weekends 

To schedule an Interview 
Call Mr. Rich 
800-531-2542 

Or e-mail resume to: 
ryan.staten@ipa-lba.com 

www.lpa-iba.com 

Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

******* 



MAINTENANCE WORKER 
BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

Outstanding opportunity! Position performs skilled 
work in maintenance and care of City facilities/ In- 
frastructure. Outies Include use of construction 
tools & equipment; operation of all types of trucks. 
May invoive heavy filling. Electrical knowledge, 
wolding/fabricalion, mechanical skills and carpen- 
try are pluses. 

Must be willing to work on a team or Independent- 
ly. The abilities to complete paperwork and to 
communicate effectively with employees at all lev- 
els ere critical. Must be at least 18 years old, havo 
a good driving record and be able to obtain a com- 
mercial drivers license within 6 months of hire. Ex- 
cellent benefits package. Salary range: $40,420- 
S57.430. Applications available online. 
Mail or fax applications by May 4 to: 

The City of Lake Forest 

Attn.: Human Resources 

220 E. Oeorpath 

Lake Forest, IL 60045 

Fax: 847.615.4289 

www.cityof lake forest.com 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



Municipal 

The City of North Chicago 

Is currently accepting applications 

for the following positions; 

Assistant Director 

of the Community Oovelopment and Planning 
Department - Under the direction o! the Director 
ol Community Development, the Incumbent 
I acts as the City's liaison wilh HUD and ihe 
j Lake County Consortium and coordinates Die 
■ dl/s economic development programs. Re- 
j quires Bachelors Degree In Urban Planning, 
I Master's Degree preferred; two (2) years pro- 
1 gressfvely responsible experience in Communl- 
[ ty Development Block Grant (CDBG) adminls- 
i trallon. 

Microbiologist 

I In the Water Department - Under the direction 
i of the Water Superintendent, this position Is re- 
sponsible for the chemical and bacteriological 
sampling and testing of potable within the City 
of North Chicago. Requires Bachelors Degree 
In Natural or Physical Sciences with a minimum 
of 24 semester hours In chemistry and/or mi- 
crobiology; minimum three (3) years experi- 
ence In the environmental laboratory. 



Applications are available In the 
Human Resources Department at the 

City of North Chicago 

1 850 Lewis Avenue 

North Chicago IL 60064 

from 8 AM to 5 PM until 

closing date May 4, 2007. 



OTTO Engineering, Inc. ii a fast growing manufacturer of 
switches and audio products. 



SR. QUALITY LAB TECHNICIAN 



Duties include performing electrical (setting up 
resistive/Inductive electrical loads), mechanical and 
environmental tests on products & documenting results; 
maintain computerized files & construct/sec up/calibrate 
test equipment. Familiarity with baste laboratory 
procedures, mechanical aptitude, excellent communication 
skills, some post-secondary training & a working 
knowledge of electrical fundamentals required. Previous 
laboratory experience preferred. Attention to detail and 
ability to work In a fast-paced environment Is a crucial 
success factor. 

OTTO Engineering, Inc. provides a pleasant work 

atmosphere, competitive pi/ & excellent benefits including 
40l(k), health, dental and life Insurance, profit sharing, 
tuition reimbursement & more. Please apply In person at 
2 E. Main St., Carpemersvilie, IL 60 j 1 or visit our website 
at www.ottoeng.com to submit your resume. EOE 



OTTO 



Retail 



itCE 



Hardware 



Full & Part Time 
Sales Clerks & Cashiers 

Are you a "People Person"? 
Then Ace may be the place for you. 
Successful Lake County Ace Hardware 
retailer has several openings at lis 7 stores 
(Round Lake, Gumea, Libartyville, 
Mundeloin. Wauconda, Grayslako and 
Waukegan North). Great working environ- 
ment. We have a complete training pro- 
gram. Weekends are required. Bilingual a 
plus. Alt our staff receive a discount. Full 
Time Benefit package includes insurance, 
401 K wilh Company Match, vacation pay 
and more, 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

659 W. Railroad Ave. (Rt. 134) Round Lake 

1 55 Petersen Road (Rl. 137) Ubertyvillo 

4806 Grand Avenue (Rl. 1 32) Gurneo 

609 E. Hawley Street Mundelein 

25 W. Liberty St. (Rl. 176) Wauconda 

945 E, Belvidere Road (Rl. 120) Grayslake 

3232 N, Lewis 'Waukegan 



Restaurant 

Bartender FT/FT 
Reslauranl/Bar In Pow- 
ers Lake, Wl min from 
IL border. Eves & wk- 
ends. Flex schedule. 
Please call Tom at: 
815-790-0213 



Restaurant 

Far NW suburbs, 
tenders & Servers. 
Bob B47-287-2354 



Bar- 
Call 



Ads (hat work pay for 
ihemsetves. Ads lhaf don't 
work are expensive. De- 
scription bnngs results! 
Journal Classified (800) 
589B237. 



Municipal 

The Board o! Fire and Police 

Commissioners will have 

applications available for the 

Police Officer Entrance Exam from 

April 16, 2007 through May 11, 2007. 

Applications can be picked up at tho North 
Chicago City Hall, 1850 Lewis Ave, North 
Chicago, at the Payment Center Monday 
through Friday beiween ihe hours ol 6.00AM - 
5:00PM. A non-rolundablo S25.00 charge for 
application processing will bo required. Pay- 
men! must be made In Iho form of cash, money 
order, or a certifiod check payable lo tho City ol 
North Chicago upon receiving on application. 
Starting salary S45,824; prior Illinois police cer- 
tification and experience, salary up to 552,031. 

ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE COMPLETED 

AND RETURNED BY MAY 11. 2007, 5:00PM 

(NO EXCEPTIONS) 






HS04+ 

At CON-WAY, we make It our business to make 
sure thai at the end of every business day... you 
can drive home. That's because we know what's 
important to you, and if it's Important to you, it's 
important to us. Build a belter future and enjoy a 
belter life: that's the CON-WAY way. 





Join the leader ol the trucking industry 
as a Driver/Sales Representative 
for Con-Way freight. Requires a 
Class A CDL with hazardous and 

doubles/triples endorsements. Medical, dental, 

vision and prescription benefits after 3 months. 

We also offer profit sharing and a 401 Ik} program. 

Ask us about our hazmal reimbursement program. 



mmmmmmmm 



We are currently accepting applications for 
positions in our Driver Apprentice Program. 
Qualified applicants with a Class A CDL 
instruction permit with hazardous materia! and 
doubles/iriples endorsements will receive this 
training at no charge. Best of all, we will hire 
you to work on our dock while you are going 
through the programl Part-Time Dockworkers 
earn SI 4. 15 per hour. After obtaining the CDL, 
you will become a Driver for Con-Way Freight. 

Con-Way Freight oilers a comprehensive benefits 
package to all regular employees and a rewarding, 
challenging career with growth potential. 
Contact; CON-WAY Freight, 450 South 
Second St., Elgin, IL 60123; 
Call: (877I 376-2092; Fax: (847) 289-4766. 



We conduct pro-employment 
drug screen and background 
chock. Con-Way Freight Is an 
Equal Opportunity Employer, 



Ca 








ASHLEY 

I 1 1 I- \J I I . JK I 

ftciiicifflre 



ASHLEY FURNITURE 

HOMESTORE 

IN ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, 

ALGONQUIN, 

AND VERNON HILLS 

ARE GROWING! 

Ashley Furniture In Arlington Heights, Algonquin 

and Vernon Hills are seeking friendly, 

service oriented associates lo Join our team! 

Sales Associates 

(up to 8% commission) 

Customer Service/Office Assistant 

We Invite you to attend our job fair and learn more 

about one of the fastest growing companies 

In Amencal 

Courtyard Marriott 
,1311 American Lane 
Schaumburg, IL 60173 

Monday, April 30, 2007 

10:00am-7;00pm 

Ashley offers an excellent (mining program, 

comprehensive benefits, a generous employee 

discount and competilive pay! 

If you are not able to Join us: 

(414) 304-1860 Fax 

mpaszek@ashleyfurnlture.com 

Ashley HomeStore Is an 

EOE/Drug Free Workplace 



NO EXPERIENCE? 

NO PROBLEM. 

As a driver for Schneider National 
we'll train you in every aspect of the job. 




Company-provided CDL 
training Tor qualified candidates 

S33.5O0-S60.S00 

{depending on experience) 

Low-cost medical 
and dental insurance 

sdineiderjobs.com 

1-600-44-PRIDE 

SCHNEIDER. 



NATIONAL 



rcr ut.&v 



Sales 

NorthWest News Group, publisher of Northwest Herald, Kane 

County Chronicle, Weekly Journals, Lake County Journals, and 

other print and Internet publications for McHenry, Lako, Kano & 

DeKalb Counties, is expanding our Classified Department! 

The following opportunities are available In our 
Crystal Lake headquarters: 



CLASSIFIED SALES ASSOCIATE 



Asslsl customers placing advertisements ranging Irom lost puppies 
lo mulli-mllfion dollar houses. Prospect new buslnoss accounts, sell 
special sections & meet monthly sales goals in multiple publications. 
Job requirements Include a high school diploma, minimum typing 
skills of 35-40 wpm and excellent verbal & written communication 
skills. PART-TIME opportunities are available. Bilingual Spanish- 
English skills ere a plus! 



CLASSIFIED RECRUITMENT SPECIALIST 



Sell recruitment advertising, prospect (or new accounts, coordinate 
and sell special projects & maintain exceptional client relationships 
with agencies and employers. Bring your creativity lo help us 
continue to growl . 

Both positions require dependability and a demonstrated ability lo 
handle multiple priorities quickly and accurately. Must be able to 
function as a member of a team with common goals and missions 
white maintaining Individual goafs. 

This Is your opportunity to Join the fastest-growing 
Information company In the Chlcagoland areal 



Interested candidates can send their resume to 

NorthVvfest News Ooup 

Human Resources Department 

Attn: (position applying (or) 

P.O. Box 250, Crystal Lako, IL 60039 

Email: recrultmentenwnewsgroup.com 



IMS 



Must be able to pass a drug screen and background check. 
Equal Opportunity Employer 



Deadline is Monday at 5 pm for line ads, 4 pm Monday for Display Ads. 
Call (800) 589-8237 or fax to (815) 477-8898 for pricing information. 



IfMfj 




C8" Friday, April 27, 2007 



CLASSIFIED 



Lake County Journals / takeeoiintyjournals.com 



ILakeCoun 



General, FT 3400 General, PT 3420 General, PT 3420 Metlicnl/Dcntnl McdicnI/Dental Medical/Dental 

3430 3430 3430 



Sales People 
Wanted 

Independent contractors 

noodod lo covor tomtorios 

in McHenry, Kono & 

Uko Counties. 

Set your own hours end 

bo your own boss. 

Wo provide loads end 

. sales materials. 

Must bo 18 years or oldor 

with a valid driver's 

license, and prool ot 

insurance. 

Ploasa send contact 

Inlormalion to: 

salosclrcft 

nwnowsgroup.com 

and an informational form 

will bo e-mailed to you. 

SERVICE 

Extremely busy boat deal- 
ership In Fox Lake Is look- 
ing for Mechanics. Parts 
Help & other Service posi- 
tions. FT S PT positions 
available For more Info, 
please call 847-973-1 100 

Telemarketing 

COLLEGE STUDENTS 
& OTHERS 

Salo into Summed 

Call Center McHonry 

AM/PM Hrs 

Training provided! 

Daily/WWy Bonuses 

Plus Hourly Payl 

B 15-759-5051 



Warehouse Asst 

30* hours /week. 
Compel ittvo wages & 
growth opportunity with 
an Industry Leading 
Company, Must be at 
least 18 years old, able 
to hit SOIbs & possess a 
valid driver's license, 
Forklilt experience & 
tool repair experience a 
plus. Call 0I5-344-149G 
io complete a question- 
naire or lax resume 
815-344-9416 EOE 

Warehouse Dock 
Position 

fshiltexp. preferred. 

Computer skills req: 

Apply in person. 

4'" Cartage 

450 Barclay Blvd. 

Lincolnshire, IL 

847 244-2430 



OVERSTUFFED? 

Then you should run a 4- 
line, 7-day power packago 
In Journal Classilled your 
stud could become somo- 
ono elsos treasure. Call 
(800) 563-6237 today! 
Visa, Mastercard, and Dis- 
cover accepted. 



Computer /IT 



WEB 
ASSISTANT 

NorlhWcst News 

Group's dynamic Now 
Media Department has a 
part-timo opening lor an 
editorial Web Assistant 
al our Crystal Lake lo 
cation, Responsibillies 
will includo assisting the 
New Media department 
with Iho maintenance 
and story posting ol our 
Internet sites. The main 
emphasis will bo lor 
McHrjnryCourt/Sports.corn 
so a knowledge ot high 
schools sports iso must 
Candidate will also do 
updates lor our daily & 
weekly publications, as 
wen as some video editing 

A journalism back- 
ground or ic-laicd work 
oxperionco a plus. 
Working knowledge ol 
computer hardware and 
sottwaro a must. Know! 
edge ol Pholoshop, 
Fash, Final Cut Pro and 
Dreamweaver would bo 
very helpful. Ability lo 
work nights & weekends 
until 2 am required. 

For mora information or 

to submit your resume, 

pteaso contact: 

NorthWesI News Group 

Human Resourcos Depl 

Attn: WobAssistanl 

P.O. Box 250 

Crystal Lake, IL 60039 

or 

recruitment® 

nwnowsgroup.com 

Must pass a drug screen 

& background check. 

EOE 



DRIVER 

Looking for a way to 
earn somo extra $SSS 

7 Day Delivery ol 

Newspapers in the 

CRYSTAL LAKE area 

Delivery Hours 4 to 6 am 

$650+ 

Groat opportunity to earn 

somo extra money 4 still 

bo home in iho ovening. 

Musi sign contract. 

Call 815-459-8118 



Maintenance PT 

person needed to work 
tor Real Estate Man- 
agement Company, il 
you are bored sitting al 
homo and can perform 
light maintenance as a 
support person to tio up 
loose ends, call us. 
Work on an as needed 
basis. 0-15 hours per 
week. WE con work lo 
your schedule. $11 por 
hour. 
Lend Monogomonl 
815-578-4334 0x1.1 

OFFICE 

Palatine. Entry Level. 
Fax resume 847-577-0272 

OOTco 

RECEPTIONISTS 
(Part-Time) 

Miracle-Ear Rocoptfonisls 
sorvo a vital role in serving 
our clients S maintaining a 
smooth running retail loca- 
tion. Responsibilities In- 
cludo greeting & assisting 
customers, sotting appls., 
taking inbound calls & 
managing diont records. 
Customer sorvice, comput- 
er & communicalion skills 
a must. 20-25 nrs/wk with 
alternating days. EOE. Lo- 
cations in SoarsAVoodlield 
Mall & Soars/Crystal Lake. 
E-mail: 
mgaspary@ahail.com 
or fax resume to: 
630-833-8158 

SALES PERSON 

needed for fun busy bridal 
salon. Sales experience a 
plus. Must havo computer 
skills & GREAT personali- 
ty. Weekends & 1 week- 



I 



GENERAL LABOR 

Farm & garden chores, 
weeding, elc. Floxible hrs. 
S8/hr<HJps. 815-344-2693 



ay on averago. 
Call B47-625-1700 



Medical/Dental 

3430 



DENTAL ASSISTANT 
Caring FT oxp prof for 

busy gen'l dontlsl ofc. M, 
W.F somo Sats. Barr/FRG. 
Fax:847-381-0229 

Dental 

ORTHODONTIC 

CHAIRSIOEASST 
High quality ortho office 
has 4-5 day position for o 
chalrside clinical asst. 
Must bo energetic, 
dependable and possess 
good communication 
skills. Experience pre- 
ferred. Call Janet at 
Conlon & Thompson 

Orthodontics 

815-344-2840 or fax 

rosumo to 815-344-2859 

McHonry, IL 



Hoallh Caro -Therapy 
HCR MANOR CARE 

1 

I Wooro GROWING and 
curronlly seeking the 
following: 

OT 

Full-Time 

'$10,000 
SIGN-ON BONUS * 

Positions available al 

our Elk Grow Village, 

Elgin and Rolling 

Meadows facilities 

'Other OT Opportunities 

available al LI bortyvillo 

and Northbrook 

COTA 

Full-Time 

Positions available nl our 
Elk Grovo Village, Elgin, 

Railing Meadows, 
LibcrtyvitJo, Skokfo and 
Highland Park facilities. 

PT 

Full-Tlmo 

Position available ot our 
Elgin facility. 

PTA 

Full-Timo 

Positions availablo al our 

Elgin, Elk Grovo Village, 

Naporvillo. Northbrook and 

Rolling Meadows facilities 

SLP 

Full-Time 

Positions available ol our 

Elk Grove Villogo and 
Rolling Meadows facilities 

"PRN Opportunities at all 
19 Chicago facilities 
including weekends! 
Increased PRN rate! 

Helping patients overcome 
their illness and injury- 
that's what HCR Manor 
Care is all about A 1 
provider of rehabilitation 
and post-oculo core, we 
ollor a nurturing environ- 
ment where you will look 
forward to coming to work 
and giving your oil. Gradu- 
ate oraccrotlitod school and 
slate licensure required. 

Join our team today I Call 
lor more Info or send re- 
sume to Michelle Vossen, 
Therapy Recruiter, 
866-427-2004 exl. 538. 
lax: 877-479-2652, email: 
michelto.vosson® 
hcr-manorcaro.com. 
Apply online at 
www.hcr-manorcare.com. 
EEO/Drug-Freo Employer, 

People. Strength. 
Commitment. 



Health Care 

Hiring caring & responsi- 
ble caregivers lor all 
shifts. Willing to train. 
Apply in parson at: 
Sunrise Assisted 
Living of Crystal Lake 
751 E. Terra Gotta Avo 
Crystal Lake, IL600t4 
EOE 




Health Care 

Medical Asst. 

lor Pediatric olfico. PT 

Pioaso call: 

847-356-5575 

or Fax resumo to: 

B47-623-9168 



Health Coro 

RNs/LPNs 

FT Night Shift. Bo a part 

ol our Crystal Pmos 

Family. Contact Kathy 

Korn, DON tor details: 

815-459-7791 

Crystal Pines 

Rehabilitation 

& Health Care 

Center 

335 N. Illinois Street 

Crystal Lake, IL 6001 4 

EOE 



Healthcare 
Homehealth 
Nurses 

Hoaltlilrond Limited, a 
homehaallh agency lo- 
cated in Des Plain es has 
growth expansion Into 
the Northern Suburbs, 
we are currently seeking 
full time and part lime 
RN's and LPN's In the 
Crystal Lake and 
McHonry areas. 

If homehealth is your 

nlcho and you enjoy 

pcr-dlem visits, please 

coll Knthy Brockmann 

al 847-417-0963, or you 

may fox or email your 

resumo to: 

630-323-6653 or 

|rosarlo@ 
CBrecenters.com 

Medical Assistant 

Internal Medicine, Lake 

Zurich office, Able to draw 

blood. 25-30 hrs per week, 

Including Saturday. Fax 

resume 847-438-2462. 



Nursing 

RN.LPN.FT/PT In aller- 
gist's. 847-362-0691 

Worehouse 

Think fast- 
think FedEx 

FedEx Ground. Thinking 
about somo last cash and 
help with collo go? Join the 
last-paced FedEx Ground 
loam as a part-timo Pack- 
ago Handler. You'll work 
up a sweat. And in re! urn, 
gel a wookly paycheck, tu- 
ition assislanco and moro. 

P/T PACKAGE 
HANDLERS 

Qualifications: 
•18 years or oldor 

•Ability lo load, unload, 
sort packages 
•Part-timo, Tuos. - Sat., 
2:30am -7:30am, $10mr 

Must apply in person lo bo 
considered. Accepting ap- 
plications. Mon. - Thurs., 
9om-4pm: 

FedEx Ground 

205 Delia Court 

Carol Stream, IL. 60188 

V1situsalfedox.com 

FedEx Ground is an equal 
opportunity/allirmativo ac- 
tion employer (M/F/O/V), 

commuted to diversifying 
Ms workforce. 



Ground 

Business 
Opportunities 3600 



All Cash Candy Routo 
Do you cam up lo $800 
per day? Your own local 
candy routo. Includes 30 
Machines and Candy. All 
tor $9,995. 800-453-5882 
AINrr 80213 

LAUNDROMAT McHenry 
County Prolitablo. Newor 
oquip. Excellent location. 
$265,000 847-210-9374 

MODELS /ACTORS 

Licensed Agency needs 
Talent For Modeling, Print 
Ads, TV Film, Commer- 
cials and Movto Extras. 
Women, Mon, Children. 
Wo Experience Necessary 
Glamour Model Talent 
Inc. 312-337-1300 

Proud of your company? 
Put your logo in the ad. 
Journal Classified (800) 
589-8237. 



Employment 
Training 3700 

Become Illinois State 

licensed Homo Inspector 

Homo Study Courso & Lab 

$000. Quickest & Easiest 

Way to Got Your Uconso. 

Scheduling Classes NOW. 

217-839-3375 

Home Inspection 

Prcqunllflcntlon School 

www.hlpqs.com 

Part-Time, Internet 
Business Earn Potentially 
S500-SI000/moormoro. 
Flexible hours. Training 
provided. Nolnvostmenl 
required. FREE dotails. 
www.K348.com 

Ads that work pay lor 
thomsolvos. Ads Inat don't 
work are expensive. De- 
scription bnngs results! 
Journal Classified (600) 
589-8237. 

Employ men I 

Look No 
Further! 

According to the Newspa- 
per Association ol Ameri- 
ca, 47% ol job seekers soy 
newspapers are their prin- 
ciple information source, 
compared to 15% who cilo 
online sources. With Iho 
Journal Employment sec- 
tion & ChicagoJobs.com, 
you've got it coverodl To 
connect with quoliliod can- 
didates, call (800) 589- 
8237 today! 

Looking for a 
Career Change? 

According to Iho Newspa- 
per Association ol Ameri- 
ca, approximately 1/3 of all 
Job changers said Ihey 
were still checking ads In 
newspapers, and hall thai 
number had been consult- 
ing online job ads since 
their job change. Wilhlhe 
Journal Employment sec- 
tion and ChicagoJobs.- 
com, you've gol l! covered! 
To conned with qualified 
candidates, call (800) 589- 
8237 today. 



chicagojobs^qm 

get ii together. 

The job you're alter is within your grasp at ChlcaooJohs.com. 

Our reach covers 1 1 counties, including Hie city, the suburbs 
and beyond, giving you access to over 15,000 full- and part- 
time jobs from more than 90 local newspapers. Once you sign 
up with us, you'll receive automatic e-mails of jobs that match 
your skills and interests, a premier place to post your resume 
and more. 

ChlcagoJobs.com is your local source for local jobs. So tell 
us... what are you looking for? 

Get it. 

I 9 . ;* 




JumfoiMi 
OURNALSt 




.'. s a participating affiliate in OifcaQoJobs.com. 



Hsalth Caro 

Bo Iho Difference. 

Eastgato Manor of Algonquin, McHenry Counly's 
Newest Supportive Living Community, specializes 
In personal care services for seniors. Join us today 
and be the factor that makes a difference in our 
community,,, in someone's lifol 
CNAs 
Full & Part-Time, PM Shift 
Weekdays & Weekends 
Working within our team environment, selectod 
candidates will provide quality care and safe sup- 
portive services to our residents. Qualified candi- 
dates will possess proper credentials/certification 
and prior experience, proferably In a long term caro 
setting. Discover how you can crealo a bettor life 
lor yourself and our rosldents, Forward your re- 
sume to Kalhryn Woods, Administrator,, via email: 
kalhryn.woods@lexingjonhealth.com or apply at 
Eastgate Manor, 101 Eoslgato Court, Algonquin, IL 
60102. EOE M/F/D/V 



•**Nurses*** 

Rns and LPNs - Part-Time and PRN -All shifts 

CCS, a leader In providing health caro services to 

correctional facilities, currently has these openings 

for our McHenry Courtly Facllilty. Minimum of 

one year ol clinical experience preferred. 
Must receive and maintain security clearance. 

Must have current IL stale licensure 

and bo CPR certiliod. Please omall resume lo: 

hr@corroclcarosolulions.com or fax lo 

615-324-5731. -EEOE- 



AiCCS 

COHflECT'CAHE 
■ a i u r i o « > 



I CAM COUNT V 
OURNALS 



Deadline is Monday at 5 pm for line ads, 4 pm Monday for Display Ads. 
Call (800) 589-8237 or fax to (815) 477-8898 for pricing information. 



DIAL-A-SERVICE 




Null 
turn 

847 
mult 




Animal Control 

1027 




AIJ.TItATSUlM)I.IFK 

Ku ,i.i,-K c A n In, A SoKll n 'iu 

llununc Oplfve Mc<h««i> 
•Wildlife Removal 
•Anlmit Danube 

Itrpoir* 
•Antnul I'tuofinii 
•DIM Proofing 

•B«i, \Vaip>, Momcli 
■OJor C°mro1 
•Tnrc Trimming 

815-560-7421 
847-980-5561 
630-291-8274 

Over 20 yr«. 
experience 

Llcenseil & InttitvJ 

• Rc-iiJiTiiut •Conimmhl 
•Munlclpil 'Onlf Gtiirit* 



Serving Chit I jolsrsd 
& Suburb* 

24 hr Senrtco 
AHllablB - 



Call today to 
place your ad. 

815-455-4800 



Carpet 

Cleaning 



Electrical' 
1165 Services' 



1265 



AMMIKEN 
CARPET 

CLEANING 
SERVICE 




•fn AitA no) l'ju]>rt Ctantig 

•IhEkllountrdSmtH! 

•OmwrirtV SrfniiilbKl 

•I jvaJty Omul and OihtoiaI 

•Bnniiiiiltf ant Ommwriil 

niuiic;(8-17)78G-0u84 



Gleaning Services 
1195 



n 



Wwm Room 

In Uoutt 

Hcuse ft 

Fon Hup? 

Cut the Clutter 

• Eliminate Choaa 

• Gal Organized 

• Slay Organized 

Call (he Clutter Cutter 
847-223-1833 



Lake Co. 
Electric 
Service 



Specializing In 

Ceiling Fans 

Outlet & Switches 

Light Fixtures 
Recessed Lighting 
Trouble Shooting 

Steve 
847-778-1014 



Lake Co. 
Electric 
Service 



Specializing In 
Celling Fans 

Outlet & Switches 

Light Fixtures 
Recessed Lighting 

Trouble Shooting 

Steve 
847-7781014 



Handyman 1375 



Mark 

Handyman 

Services 

Hasomcut & 

Gimigc Clcanouls, 

Electrical, 

Plumbing & 
General Repairs 

FREE 
ESTIMATES 

1-847-6M-09I3 



Home 
Improvement 



H00 




TlAKE COUNTY 

JOURNALS 



New Concept In 
Home Maintenance 

Senhr Discounts 

Carpentry - Plumbing 

Electrical ■Drywali- Tile 

Siding - Kwfinj 

(847)219-7010 



Home 
Improvement 



1400 



Painting 1535 



From The 
Grounds Up 

Capitol 
Group LLC 

' Flood & Fire Restoration 

• Remodeling * DccVi 

* Flooring 

• All Season Rooms 

• Screened Porchn 

• Kltchem * Bathroom* 

• Siding • And More.. 

HnMk Espadol 

IKulty Injured • i"iw EMHtH 
1 815-790-2416 1 
1 815-370-8148 1 



Landscaping 1460 



MARGE'S LANDSCAPING 



FAST REASONABLE 
OLD FASHIONED SERVICE 

Professional nark at 

Very rcasonahle prices 

Free Eill males St Resign 

NOW COOKING 
SPRING CLEAN UPS 

Hardwood Mulch 
Delivered 

847-265-5763 
OLD MILL CREEK, IL 



Painting 



-Ottr 1 7 yarn upttlenn- 

• Owner always on site 

• No job loo small 

• Power Washing 

• Drjwall repair 

Inltrlar/Eiltrlw 

fr« fifnefn 

(847)838 2275 



CHARGE 
IT! 




Accepted 

for the 

Classified 

Ads 




•Your toilet is 
busted, 

•Your gutters are 
clogged, 

•Your driveway 
j needs plowing. 

Steps to Sanity: 

w§$M 1. Pick up the phone. 

2. Pick up the Dial-A- 
Service Directory 



/ 

7 
I 

1 

< 
I 

J 
\ 



ft 



Ilake county 

Journals 3, Exhale 



To place your Dial-A-Service ad call (815) 526-4645. Deadline for Ads is Friday at 4 p.m. 




■( 



LakeCountyJournais.com 



- 

■i 



■ 



I 



MELS 



April 27, 2007 • Page C9 





Ingk. 




ONTIAC feSABU-S. 



ACURAOFLIBERTYVILLE 
v^:- Siiih vt m i » i « Am * i ttc^ i«. i 
800/588-4187 F3 

wnucurallbertyvlllecom 

HUUER'S WOOOFiaO ACURA 
DH VI Hijon M. mi lb • Hcflra fattn, II 
847/519-9550 D5 

mtiilerc4rs.com 



REICH ERT CHEVROLET 
MftKVXvf •CryatlUKIl 
815/459-4000 

www.ftlchcrliutos.corn 



83 



MOTOR WERKS HONDA 

Hir rifqr.tfl I OloJm fdl * Sarnrqloi, II 

800-935-5913 D4 

www.motorTwrks.com 



REICHERT CHEVROLET 

815/338-2780 A2 

www.rekheftduloi.com 



HnYSLeR 





SCHAUMBURG AUIM 
l»*C«fRm» Sclnntoit.il 
800/259-1757 

•«-n-w.ichduinbufg4uiji,CDfn 



D5 




ANDERSON BMW 

J[0 N.ttr. II • trpt illil», II 

888/682-4485 

wvrtf.anderjonearj.com 



B3 



BILL JACOBS BMW 

l<« f. 0|6tt M. • HJjrailB. IL 
600/731-5824 D8 

wwwtiiUjaeobijeom 

MOTOR WERKS BMW 

8cr,r.jtoi i CliIw I: Is • EUmiitUi IL 

800/935-5913 04 

wvrir.motorwcr k5.com 

MOTOR WERKS 
CERTIFIED OUTLET 

iikVtiiltwjtntMn&tiiAci 

>:otw. Kiu'Kfi:. i.nt Ti) 

or 1Q00 A Co* Rfl. lit. Ml, Hiltrwi 

£ Kfi* J, L 

800/935-5909 D5 

wrnrw.mote<'w*r)ti.com 




ANTHONY PONTIAC BUICK GMC 

T225 Cr«it Aw.Cumi, II 60O31 

"800/620-0722 ~F2 

untrionypontfdc.com 



GARY LANG BUICK 

Rout* 11, ictroin Cryml lit* I HcH4iry 
888/794-5502 C3 

M'd'^.OJfVli) Fi9iutO.Com 



REICHERT BUICK 

5«0RVl H*y 'CrjsLilUU. U 

815/459-4000 

www.reJcherlauloi.jcom 



B3 



REICHERT BUICK 

21 AS S, fat«»4 Df. •taotltoil. II 
815/338-2780 A2 

www.relchertauloixom 

WOODY BUICK POHTt AC GMC 

<m t Ctinpj Urr«t * [fyn. II 

800/758-1205 C5 

mww.woodyca re.com 




ALP1EM0NTE 
CADILLAC Of ST CHARLES 

V<nLKlllSt(tt.64]*SLCtvkf 
630/513-5353 86 

'.piernontecadtltac.com 



GARY LANG CADILLAC 

Routt 3i. tttmia Cryittl tikt i Welkin; 
888/794-5502 C3 

■nrnrw.1jjrYldn93uto.com 

MOTOR WERKS CADiLLAC 

2MH/CotKSt.*tJTThftoi,ll 
800/935-5923 D4 

www.rno!orw«rU.ccfTi 




ALPlfMONTE CHEVROLET 
. T?0QuifMHW-(tt2S)*Cui<Jtr.U 
847/426-2000 C4 

www.plcntontcQroupxom 

GARY LANG CHEVROLET 

Acuta 31. t«tH«*D CryiUl li»f 1 MctMiqr 

888/794-5502 C3 

wft-Hr.9Afvl4n9auto.com 

RAY CHEVROLET 

3»H.'btt«l2*foiLil»,ll 

866/RAY-CHEVV 02 

aaychavroleUom 



D1 



RAYMOND CHEVROLET 

niRwi»m«ATit«»,u 

847/395-3600 

wnfw.r4ymondcbevrolot.com 



CHRYSLER-DODGE OF FOX LAKE 

m at u.fcii.-vjo.ii 
847/497-4200 D2 

HWMchr^tlDrdod^KilfbitaVfxom 

CRYSTAL LAKE CHRYSLER 

WMSRt.Jl* CrritJlltto.il 
888/800-6100 83 
www.ct-cj.com 

FENZEL MOTOR SALES 

206$ StittStn«t • HirtfKiitrt, II 
847/683-2424 A4 

SUNNYSIDE COMPANY 
CHRYSLER DODGE 
P»t«120*W:K<rrf,t 
815/385-7220 C2 

www.stmnyiidecompany.com 



ELGIN HYUNDAI 

6SllCrira}ftSt.*ttajt,fl 
847/888-8222 C5 

www.clglnliyunct4l.com 

ROSEN HYUNDAI 

ms. fjffUl III. • MfJfQjit, It 
866/469-0114 B4 

www.rosenfosenrosen.com 

GURNEE HYUNDAI 

fijil Cr ltd iiviit * Gemot, It 
800/613-8096 F2 

www, tjUfnwlTyuridiii.com 




CHAMPION DODGE 
CHRYSLER JEEP 

SOS ktrttwiit Hrf. • BirriielM. IL 
888/503-2999 D4 

www.champlonautomall.com 

CHRYSLER-DODGE OF FOX LAKE 

Hll»t 12, foiUto.lt 
847/497-4200 D2 

HWAc^^ysterdod^toltoilakvjcorn 

DODGE OF ANTIOCH 
19SRL1TJ Mitel), It 
888-493-1854 D1 

www.dodqeofflnliocd.com 

VIKING DODGE 

01 hutt iffiat toutt w • cr r>w uw, & 
815/459-8000 B3 

www.vikinqdad5c.com 




BUSS FORD 

III S. Rio 31 • WcH01rf.IL 

815/385-2000 C2 

www.tuuIord.com 

EXTREME FORD 

S2llMH»y. •<nitail.Hi.ri 
815/459-8200 S3 

ww w.oxt remKlordHia.com 

SPRING ma FORD 

tOO totdi» */».• fr.t Outfw, L 
847/551-3300 C4 

TOM PECK FORD 

lMMAitaKlltr. •Hlilttry, II 

847/669-6060 A4 

www.tompeckfordjeom 

WOODSTOCK FORD/MERCURY 

WiO S. fatwoi Or. • Uicditoct, II 
800/664-0896 A2 

WWW.47fordjcom 



SMI 



JWWflSCT' 



ANTHONY PONTIACBUKK GMC 
222S C r 1 1 i An, Cant*. II 6C0B 
800/620-0722 F2 

w w w..fln I li ny pa n t la c. corn 

CRYSTAL LAKE GMC 

OttNtfHvMCiyttiHiUtll 
815/477-8600 B3 

www.cryitdlldMrprxitlac.com 

GARY UNO GMC. 

tott ft bttwrn Crystal tail I Heritor/ 
888/794-5502 C3 

www.g3rylancjflut0.ccm 

WOODY BUICK PONTMC GMC 

f49t.CKu]»S(r»it*Ptjb,IV 
800/758-1205 C5 

www.woodycari.com 



HONDii 




BRJLLANCE HONDA 

210 ■. It 31 • fiti Jl l (W • Crtilit l*», II 
888/360-5336 B3 

bfllltarxehoiidft.com 



MERCEDES-BENZ OF 
HOFFMAN ESTATES 

A M0TQ9 WORKS GOMRW 
KOO at. Carl W. • Rotlnw Eililit. 11 
888/641-9129 D5 

www.mercede4holfman.com 

MERCEDES-BENZ OF 
ST. CHARLES 

m Kortl fUldJll Rut • It. Cur In II 
800 - NEW BENZ B6 

www.mbchi.com 

MOTOR WERKS MERCEDES-BENZ 

E.irrnjtai i luiocr Rlt • Birriicttn. 11 

800/935-5913 04 

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MOTOR WERKS 
CERTIFIED OUTLET 

till hid Iiaiit hiMnl WmU 

»:ot V. Hiior.s fl d lit. 71) or 1000 * C:i> 
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ANTHONY PONTIAC BUICK GMC 
7?<SGfjfdii».&iriw.ll6M3l 
800/620-0722 F2 

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CRYSTAL LAKE PONTIAC 

(.)J)MtVH.M|..CrfitilUto rl 
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2MS S. UitwoJ Dt • w « dr.cci li 
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K4Uho)o Strut *tliii, 11 
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Roitr Jl, Srf uni Ctyitll 111* t McKttn 

888/794-5502 C3 

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5*» 5. lit H •tnitilliU.il 
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■ tl l I i ii if 



C1Q * April 27, 2007 



.WHEELS. 



LakeCountyJournai5.com 



I LAKE COUNTY 
OURNALS 



WHEELS 



Spring ahead with 
driving safety tips 



Looking for a new car? 

Read the Wheels section every week 
in the Market Place section. 



^:?w5-:.., : !tyi,:.v 



1 



When cold weather begins 
to warm, motorists may think 
their driving cares have melt- 
ed away with the winter ice 
and snow. Not so. 

Spring brings its own set of 
challenges Tor safety con- 
scious drivers. Many drivers 
underestimate the need for 
control that all-wheel drive 
provides in slick rainy condi- 
tions - after the snow and ice 
have melted. 

Just as you winterized 
your car with an eye to safety 
last Tall, it's time to begin 
work on your spring automo- 
tive safety check list. Here are 
some hints for ensuring your 
car is in top condition for safe 
spring motoring: 

• Rain is a common spring 
driving hazard. While most 
people think or ice or snow 
when cautioned about slip- 
pery roads, the truth is wet 
roads can be just as stick. 
Tires can hydroplane on a 
layer of water, losing contact 
with the road and causing the 
vehicle to skid. Rain lifts oil 
and other slippery fluids, 
dripped by passing autos, cre- 
ating a slick layer on the 
blacktop. Flooded roads can 
flood out engines. Slow down 
on wet roads. Consider buying 
a vehicle with features like all 
wheel drive and electronic 
stability control. 

Start out with a safe car. 
Studies show that all wheel 
drive and electronic stability 
control significantly reduce 
the risk of being involved in a 
crash. Automakers are begin- 
ning to offer the technologies 




Check coolant level, hoses 
to avoid overheating 



on more models. 

* Replace worn tires. Your 
tires are what keep the car on 
the road. Worn out treads pro- 
vide less traction and greater 
chance to slide. Likewise, 
make sure tires are inflated 
properly according to your 
vehicle's owner's manual. 

• Spring showers bring 
May flowers, but let this be a 
reminder to also check and 
replace worn wiper blades. 
Poorly maintained wind- 
shield wipers can hamper vis- 
ibility in poor weather. After a 
long winter of salt and other 
road residue on the windows, 
wiper effectiveness is greatly 
enhanced by cleaning the 
glass with a strong glass 
cleaner that can remove the 
oily film. And don't forget the 
inside of the glass. Removing 
the film on the inside can help 
the defroster clear faster and 
reduce moisture build-up. 



The Car Care Council rec- 
ommends checking tire treads 
and windshield wiper quality 
in preparation for spring driv- 
ing conditions. 

In our research of vehicles 
brought in for their April 
check-up, close to one-fifth of 
vehicles (17 percent) had front 
windshield wiper failures and 
12 percent of vehicles needed 
service on their rear wipers 
and/or washers," says Rich 
White, executive director of 
the Car Care Council. 

• Spring rain can also 
dampen visibility so it is 
important to check all vehicle 
lighting including headlights, 
taillights, back-up lights, turn 
signals, parking 'lights and 
break lights. TheSe lights are 
important not only because 
they help you to see, but also 
serve as a way to help you 
communicate clearly with 
other motorists. 



When a cooling system 
fails, the engine overheats. 
And when a car overiieats for 
very long, metal engine parts 
can be seriously damaged and 
require expensive repair. 

Overheating can result 
when the coolant level is too 
low or when there is a leak in 
the system. Sometimes just 
driving in stop-and-go traffic 
on a hot summer day with the 
air conditioner running Is 
enough to overheat the 
engine. 

Coolant loss 

A low coolant level leads to 
overheating because there 
isn't enough fluid in the sys- 
tem to absorb engine heat. 
Tlie air in the system that is 
absorbing these high temper- 
atures is a poor heat conduc- 
tor and won't do an effective 
job of transferring the heat to 
the radiator. 

Cars with coolant recovery 
tanks have markings on the 



white plastic tank indicating 
where coolant levels should 
be when the car is running 
and when it's not. If the 
coolant level is low after 
repeated fillings, you proba- 
bly have a leak in the system. 

Coolant hose leaks 

Hoses are the most likely 
source of leaks because they 
are structurally the weakest 
components of the cooling 
system. Hoses must be flexi- 
ble to absorb vibration, so 
they are made of rubber com- 
pounds. Rubber, unfortunate- 
ly, is not as durable as metal. 

intense engine heat can 
harden, and crack even the 
best rubber; oil can soften and 
swell it; the simple passage of 
time can break down its inter- 
nal bonding; and electrochem- 
ical degradation can crack the 
tube. 

In many instances, hose 
leaks occur at faulty connec- 
tions to the inlet and outlet 




To avoid overheating during sum- 
mer driving, engineers say radia- 
tor hoses should be replaced 
every four years. 

pipes on the radiator and 
engine. Make certain the hose 
clamps are secure. 

All cooling system hoses 
should be inspected every six 
months. Most often, the 
upper radiator hose and the 
curved bypass hose will fail 
without warning. But, even- 
tually they all will need to be 
replaced. 



Did you know? 

Each year, Kelley Blue Book releases their winners for the Best Resale Value Awards. These 
awards are designed to inform both new and used car buyers of the vehicles that are expected 
to maintain the greatest proportion of their retail price five years after ownership. The list is 
based on the analysis of Kelley Blue Book experts, who for years have helped buyers and sellers 
determine fair prices for vehicles. In 2007, the Best Resale Value Brand Award was given to both 
Honda and Acura. Acura picked up additional awards in both the Sedan category, with its Acura 
TSX, and in the Sport Utility category, with the Acura MDX. The Honda Civic took home the 
award for Best Resale Value in the Coupe category, while the Honda Odyssey won for Best 
Resale Value in the Van/Minivan category. Other winners include the Volkswagen Passat (Best 
Resale, Wagon) and the MINI Cooper, which won awards in both the Convertible and Hatchback 
categories. These awards should be taken seriouslyby consumers, as the biggest expense typi- 
cally incurred by car owners in the first five years of ownership is depreciation in value. 




( 96 HOUR SALES EVENT! ) 
234 New & Used Cars & Trucks MUST BE SOLD! 




ALL NEW 2008 

Dodge Avenger SXT 

Was 23,075* 

. NOW $21,972* ■ 



•\r 




2008 Chrysler 
sebring Convertible 

JUST 
ARRIVED! 




2007 

Dodge Calibers 

Starting At 
$14,381* 

Plenty to choose from 



2007 

Dodge Magnums 

Starting At 
$21,125* 

Plenty to choose from 



fo 



It's no secret that we have the best pre-owned vehicles in town, but 

don't take our word for it - come in and see for yourselft 

How do you spell value? Chrysler/Dodge of fox Lake!!! 

Open Position for Salesmen. Ask for JASON. 



4fe 



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USED CARS 



i& 



2006 Dodge Strotui SXT.....!!!!™!. BUY FOR $1 1,619 or $126/Monrh* 

1999 Jeep Wrangler Sport V6, A/C.,..... m ... „ BUY FOR $1 1,886 or $129/Mon»h+ 

2005 Solum ION 2...... ............................. „.„. BUY FOR $1 1,946 or $130/Monfh+ 

2002 Mitiubtihl Montero XLS „.....,. BUY FOR $1 1,997 or $1 32/Monrh+ 

2006 Dodge Stratu* SXT V6... .BUY FOR $12,323 or $137/Monrh+ 

2006 Chryf lor PT Cruller LTD BUY FOR $ 1 3,644 or $ 1 55/Monrh+ 

2006 Chevy Malibu IT. , BUY FOR $1 4,108 or $ 162/Month+ 

2006 Chovy HHR IT. ..„ „ „,„..,. , ......BUY FOR $14,668 or $170/Month+ 

2003 NUwn Maxima 51 «„ „„„...„.......„„....„ ....BUY FOR $14,995,or $175/Monrh+ 

2004 Chryiler Searing Convertible LTD „ BUY FOR $ 15,982 or $T89/Monrh+ 



2006 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Certified BUY FOR $15,978 or $lB9/Month+ 

2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo...... » BUY FOR $16/475 ar $197/Month+ 

2006 Chrysler Pacffka Touring . BUY FOR $16,776 or $201 /Month* 

2006 Jeep liberty 4x4, Certified «...».. — .»...«.»»,».«...».»..»...»..BUY FOR $16,921 or $203/Monlh+ 

2005 Ford Escape LTD.... ~ BUY FOR $17,946 or $219/Month + 

2005 Dodge Dakota SIT 4x4, Quad Cab.... - BUY FOR $19,446 or $240/Month+ 

2007 Jeep liberty 4x4, Certified (2) BUY FOR $19,981 or $248/Monrh+ 

2007 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (3), Certified BUY FOR $20,743 or $259/Month+ 

2005 Dodge Ram 1500 Heml » «... BUY FOR $22,468 or $284/Month+ 

2006 Dodge Charger R/T,.„.„. • ............BUY FOR $25,995 or $336/Monlh+ 



CHRYSLER LEASE CUSTOMERS.. .Well Make Your Last 6 Payments! Drive A New Car TODAY!" 

Now 2 Locations to Serve you. Crystal Lake Pontiac • GMC. 6305 NW HWV .(Rt.1 4) in Crystal Lake 




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Jfl/HEELi 



April 27, 2007 ■ Cll 



if?. 



4/ 












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I 






Auto repairs: Protecting yourself against fraud 



Which Is more important, 
saving money on car repairs 
or saving your life? 

Finding a reputable shop 
to take your vehicle for major 
repairs— perhaps due to an 
accident or mechanical prob- 
lems—can help protect you, 
your passengers and your 
wallet from harm. 

Although most body shops 
are honest, some will try to 
defraud you and your insur- 
ance company. There are a 
number of scams they might 
try— from padding charges to 
using defective parts to per- 
forming shoddy repair 



work— and it's the customer 
who ends up paying, via 
increased insurance premi- 
ums. 

The headaches and time 
spent fixing fraudulent 
repairs are never worth the 
cost. But worse, these scams 
can make your vehicle unsafe 
and threaten your life. 

Consider this actual inci- 
dent: A car was brought in to 
a repair shop to have the 
steering assembly repaired. 
The mechanic, instead of 
using new or even refur- 
bished parts, put the assem- 
bly back together with a coat 



hanger. Willie the driver was 
on the road, the hanger broke 
and the car veered off the 
road into a house. 

In other words, finding a 
quality, reliable repair shop 
means more than just good 
prices and less hassle; it's a 
matter of protecting yourself 
and your family. The 
Coalition Against Insurance 
Fraud offers these tips for 
finding a suitable shop: 

* Ask your auto insurer, 
friends and colleagues to rec- 
ommend quality body shops. 

• Does the shop have a 
written warranty and guaran- 



tee of customer satisfaction? 

• Get a written estimate 
before authorizing repairs. 
Estimates should say the shop 
will contact you for approval 
before performing work 
exceeding a specific amount. 

• When you pick up your 
car, ask the service manager 
to explain all work completed 
and all replacements made. 
Have new parts pointed out to 
you. Ask to see old, replaced 
parts. 

• If you can't resolve prob- 
lems, contact your local 
Better Business Bureau. If 
you suspect fraud, contact 



your insurance company and 
state fraud bureau. 

■ Make sure your bill legi- 
bly Itemizes all work done, 
including parts, repairs and 
any guarantees. 

■ Is the final bill close to 
the estimate? Have the shop 
explain any extra charges or 
work. 

• If you aren't satisfied 
with the repairs, explain your 
problem and have the shop 
correct it. 

For more information about 
how to protect youi'self against 
different insurance scams, visit 
www.InsuranccFraud.org. 



WtBf^S* 


plJ^^mm .i 


"7 Jr^ ' '■ 








\ 


HB r " : ^ Vm 





When you have car repairs made, 
it's important to work with a rep- 
utable body shop to protect your- 
self against insurance fraud, 




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855 E. Grand Ave. (Just East of Route 83) 



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USED VEHICLE BLOWOUT! 



00 FORD TAURUS .'4,995 

05 SUZUKI RENO '6,795 

03 CHEVY MONTE CARLO '7,995 

05 CHEVY CAVALIER '7,995 

00 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE .'8,295 

02 DODGE CARAVAN HIGHTOP with Entertainment System . .'8,495 

04 PONTIAC GRAND AM ..'8,495 

02 OLDSMORILE 8RAVADA .'8,995 

05 DODGE NEON SXT '8,995 

03 TOYOTA MATRIX '9,895 

06 KIA SPECTRA EX '10,495 

03 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE '11,995 

06 FORD FOCUS SX4 SE .11,995 

01 AUDI A6 '12,295 

03 DODGE DURANGO '12,295 

06 CHEVY HHR '12,995 

05 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER.. ...'12,995 

04 NISSAN ALTIMA 13,295 

04 JEEP LIBERTY '14,395 

03 CHEVY S-10 PICK-UP EXTENDED CAB 4X4 '14,995 

06 MAZDA 3 HATCHBACK .....'15,395 

05 DODGE MAGNUM .'15,395 

04 HONDA ACCORD EX... .'15,998 

04 NISSAN MAXIMA.. ...'18j995 

06 MAZDA 6 SPEED '24,295 

All prices plus tut, title, license & DOC FEE. See denier tor detain. MJ LCJ 04/26/07 and 04/27/07 ■•' '• v >\- l 




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NEW 2006 DODGE CMMHUT SITT 

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rti 



T 

NO 

PAYMENTS 

TIL LABOR DAY! 



GOOD 



wnnmm 

Stk0C6O27, Aula, A7C, h. 
Tilt, Cruise, Alloys, Tinted f 
Glass, Pwr. Steering, Pwr. 
Brakes & More! 



15,997 




immiwimMnmmw 



ptua- 

kBonus Cash! 






Hi 



NEW2006JEEP 



ON LIBERTY 



RvS;- V '■•>.'..-" 



^23^ 




. Wind#s, pwr-Locksi MIK Wij v 

I LeatHer, SunrMTow Rkg;,£Jli w m * 
1 Chrome Whis.i LOADED!!! ■ W I 



M'RkgliS 






•Stk#J6717;-.. .v.- 
^rf S0FT1OPIII 





^il!i!iiij-^i 




Stk« C6054, Auto., Pwr. * 
Windows, Pwr. Locks, Tilt,9 
Cruise, Keyless, Tinted 
Glass, Loaded & Morel 



BEST 



lli 

Stk#C6669, Auto., P/W, 6 
P/L, Tilt, Cruise, Keyless,^ 
P/Hatch, Rear Heat/Air, 
Alloys, Loaded! Loaded! 
OR LEASE FOR 




il 1MB 

21497 



$■ 



27 MONTH LEASE 

Win** SODue@ncep6on, tax,tite, 
lllUi ScSdocteedueatsigning- 



'00 GMC 
SONOMA 

AP2001A 

$6,997 



02 MAZDA 
PROTEGE 

#P1B93A 

$7,897 



'94 LEXUS 
LS400 

HD5793B, 
luullier, Pwi. [vciylliing! 



-, '05 DODGE.-. 
STRATUS SXT 

SP1990 

$19,989 



'01 INFINITI 
130 

HD6553A, IEATIIER & LOADED! 

$11,747 



i I fwEWS^WAGEBSPJCIALl u _- «^ij 




'99 BMW 



anitqiD i„ n1 |,,. r SMJ6330A.22rMwnos. Suede Headiiwr. 

#D6b96B, Lcalhi; ■ EVERmCTORV OPTION!!' Lradtdl 6Ki 

Low Miles. Loaned! ; y^t 



06 JEEP 

LIBERTY RENEGADE 4X4 

IP2015 ' 



'02 CHEVY SILVERADO 
Z71 LTK1500 4DR. 

#P1W 



'04 JEEP GRAND 
CHEROKEE LTD. 4X4; 

#P2020.25KMilBsAthr.,47L . 

Black, Aulo., Pwr. EverylHnfll j 



'02 CHRYSLER' 

TOWN & COUNTRY LTD. AWD 
IDC65B0A 



$11,998 



'03 VW 
JETTA SEDAN GLS 

HJ57ISA 

$13,897 



'06 JEEP LIBERTY RENEGADE 4X4 

SIWP2015, 3.7L. P/W, P^L, CO, Tilt, 

Cruise, A/C, Alloys, Buckets, 

Luggago Rack & Morel 

$1 e,980 



'03 CHEVY 
IMPALA 

IP1B6B 

$8,999 

jr »vi zsrcnnsr - '02 dodge 

F cTT-4 fl»iH3EE i G« CARAVAN ES AWD. 

••^-— - ■■•- ■'■- -> » «■ #D6mA^ 



'03 CHEVROLET 
IMPALA LS 

#D4819A 

$11,747 




,<03 CHRYSLER 
T&C LXI 

0C6Z63A t 



'04 CHRYSLER 
PACIFICA 

• JKD667SB, Llhr., 
' Loaded! 

$14,997 

'AWmWiAf.W 



S 16.988 ' E--3BE1JU $29,989 



'05 CHRYSLER 
PACIFICA TOURING 

/(P703I. 

$16,997 



$18,988 



HBBEHIBl 



'03 JEEP 
LIBERTY RENEGADE 

•J6486A 

$12,997 



BEETLE CONVERT.ir^^ 

#J6836A, Lir/y^'- 

Rcody Lor Summot! |- 2T0 V" 

, muuitcid*hnnBr%^Vc 

DURANGO SLT 4X4 

#J6683A 



$13,897 



■06 CHHY5LEH SEBRIHG COHVEItl 

Stk«P2026, Aula, 2.TL 

^ . Ait Cowl., AJATM*/CD, Tilt, 
CnjiM Pwr. Everything^ Morel 
$■ 



Cruisfl Pwr. Everything* More! 

'16,997 



'03FORD,,- 
EXPLORER XLT 

K60B8A 



SJ6353A 



$13,897 



$15,989 



$16,998 



'04 DQLX5E 
DURANGO 4X4 

IC5499A . 
Loadedl Leolhei! 




SCS65SA 



$9,897 



05 DODGE 
CARAVAN SE 

' #DS984A 

$9,897 



$11,747 



'01 FORD 
EXPEDITION E.B. 

#06406B 

$11,747 



'06 JEEP COMMANDER LTD. AWD. 

Slk*P2029, Auto,, H/Leather, Rear 

Video, Keyless, Pwr. Everything, 

Sunrool. HEMI & More!! 



'02 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 
LAREDO f SPECIAL EDmON 4-WD. 

SMJ6849A, 4.0L MM., Stone Wlwte. Auto, 
power Everyming! Loaded! 

*1 1 ,997 






'01 MAZDA 
Ml ATA 

\ W64B6AA 

$12,997 



X^U^jLX 



'03 JEEP 
WRANGLER SPORT 4X4 

/Mo572A, 2-Tops! Aulo , CD, Till, 
Cruhu, 2 TO CHOOSE TROM! 

$13,989 



706 CHRYSLER 
PACIFICA 

;#J61B1A. .... 
, Only 13K Miles! 

$15,997 



'04 DODGE 
STRATUS SXT 

$16,998 



'04 DODGE 



$18,997 



< , IP2045. Only.p MILESI 
MUSTSKI 



OnlyLlKMII 
.AtlSTKI^J 

$19,997 



'99 FORD 
EXPEDITION E.B. 

KJ636SA 

$9,897 



'05 DODGE 
NEON SXT 

, W1970 



'07 DODGE CHARGER R/T 

StklP2030, 5.7L HEMI, Leather, Pwr. 
EverytliirH), Sunrool, Keyless, Low, L 
Miles, HOT ROD!!! 




02 JEEP J , 

GRAND CHEROKEE UMITEDl 

,;, ■ ',#C66S5A' ' 



'04 DODGE 
GRAND CARAVAN I 



SDI0.161! 






$9,897 



■ ( 



$11,747 



n E CAN 4»lvl VVll J Mill V I WG 

\mssBBMwm 

1 1-888-792-7483 

ASK FPU GREG 




'04 KIA 
AMANTI 

#PI6<17 



$16,980 



<04 DODGE RAM 2500 Q.C. 4X4 

Stk*D6B26A,Aut0..6-Cv!.5.9L 
Diesel, Pwr. Everything, A/C, Tilt, 
j Ciulse.ABSJowPkg.t Morel 




5»b wfta* 

Sprinter can do WCA 

far you and: 

your business. 

BUSINESSL/NK 



TACOwC«riJkl.CAB4X4; 

tiwm. . 



'04 GMC 
SIERRA CREW CAB 4X4 

0D5247A 

$21,997 



06 CHRYSLER , 
TOWN & COUNTRY 

#P2025. Aulo., 3.BL,Lanlhor . N AVI • 
, Reor Video, SIGNATURE SERIES! 

$23,997 



'03 MITSUBISHI 

LANCER EVOLUTION AWD. 
#P2024 



$23,997 ||§! 



'05 CHRYSLER 

PACIFICA LIMITED AWD. 

■AP2008. 

$23,997 



06 DODGE M 
CHARGER R/T 

K0552BA, Fully LoodctH 

$25,989 



06 DODGE RAM^ 
3500 QUAD CAB 4X4 
- ID6BS2A, Diesel, 6-Spoedl 
■A liodedlll'v-i 

$39,997 




06 CHRYSLER 
300 SRT-8 

#J593'1A, 
Absolutely Loudutl!'! 

$33,988 I 



HEADQUARTERS! 




KPAHOU 505 W. NORTHWEST HWY. • BARRINGTON 

wSSSm (Just 1/2 Mile West of Rte. 59) 



saericuefllraen . . . 
Chmplon of BarringN Q ALt '- 
1 ■ ,o flamafo alL.;,. 



• T • T • 



rk&z 









a^,l Hon.-Fn. • 9.00AM ■ 9:00PM 



7 r-soMM-sei?. wWWXHAMPIONAUTOMALL.COM 



wwW.championautomall.c6m ^www 




; Saturday ■ 9.00AM • e'oOPM 
Jy seruice: 

f^Dg^V- ^-JO d "on -Tliurs '700AM ■ 700PM 
" figi Fnday 700AM -E.00PU 
^j- Saturday -700AM -2 00PM 

11 ^ Sunday • 7:00AM ■ a.OQPM 



B Ela USMjIK' W- 



H 866-279-2908 



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